Protestant Traditions that go against Scripture


#1

Many times Protestants accuse us of preaching Gospels that is not taught in Scriptures, or that our Traditions is against the “Word of God.”

Well, Protestants themselves have traditions that goes against Scripture.

  1. Bible Alone.

  2. Faith Alone.

  3. Once Saved Always Saved.

  4. The Rapture: (Belief that before the or during the Great Tribulation. All Believers will suddenly be taken into heaven (ASSUMED INTO HEAVEN) and escape persecution. Kinda odd when they say the Assumption of Mary is “Unbliblical.”

  5. Alter Calls.

  6. Playing Christian Rock Music at Worship services.

  7. Speaking in Tongues as a form of Worship.

DISCLAIMER: Not all Protestants believe these “Traditions” but some do held these beliefs.


#2

Traditions Protestants Can Accept

Are there extra-biblical Church traditions that Protestants will accept? Can even one be found?

In order to determine this fairly, we must evaluate each doctrine that is proposed as a candidate according to several criteria:

a) The doctrine in question is accepted by the Protestants to whom one is speaking
b) The doctrine is not stated in Scripture
c) The doctrine is not implied by Scripture
d) The doctrine has an extrabiblical history to which one can appeal as an alternative, extrascriptural basis

The following doctrines are proposed as those which meet all of the criteria above and are agreed to be binding upon the consciences of all believers:

  1. The canon of the New Testament
  2. Public revelation has ended
  3. There are to be no more Apostles

If any one of these three doctrines meet the criteria above, then it has been proven that Protestants have accepted teaching that has come by a source other the Bible Alone; thus, sola scriptura is false.

Condensed from:

Doctrines Known by Tradition
By James Akin


#3

It would be more accurate to say that they do things that do not have direct Scriptural support, example, or “reasonable inference”.

  1. Bible Alone.

If you really mean “Bible Alone”, then you aren’t looking at a Protestant tradition, but one that is from the Restoration Movement.

If you mean “Sola Scriptura”, then you do have Protestant Tradition.

In either instance, the position that led to that theology, was a quest to objectively determine whether or not the doctrines, practices and beliefs of the congregation were sound.

  1. Faith Alone.

This is a Protestant Tradition. The issue here is how one interprets a couple of verses that, in combination, can have one of several different meanings.(It comes to down to “Grace”, “Faith”, “Faith plus Works”, or “Works”.)

  1. Once Saved Always Saved.

This crept in, by a misunderstanding of what some of the reformers said. Like most slogans, what was meant, and what it is assumed to mean, are very different. (The intent/concept was that one would be so remorseful of one’s sins, that one would never leave the fold of Christ.)

  1. The Rapture: (Belief that before the or during the Great Tribulation. All Believers will suddenly be taken into heaven (ASSUMED INTO HEAVEN) and escape persecution. Kinda odd when they say the Assumption of Mary is “Unbliblical.”

That is dispensationism. It is not a traditional Protestant belief.
(More to the point, in developed in the late nineteenth century in England, and would have died out, had it not been for the War of Northern Aggression.)

As a theology, it has been very persuasive. Roughly a dozen verses support the entire framework.

  1. Alter Calls.

Not a Protestant tradition. It started in the late-nineteenth Century, in England, and spread to some denominations in the United States.

  1. Playing Christian Rock Music at Worship services.

Are you wanting the scriptural support for the notion that one may not play an instrument in Church?

If you are referring to the specific genre, then it is a very recent phenomena, that is found in both Catholic and Protestant congregations. If, OTOH, you are being generic, then remember that Mozart was the scandalous Rock Musician of his day.

  1. Speaking in Tongues as a form of Worship.

This dates back to the late nineteenth century. It is only practiced within some denominations.

xan

jonathon


closed #4

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