Protestantism makes me sad


#1

I see so many Protestants who love God, but being deceived by some false teachings and kept away from the Eucharist and Mary.. it really makes me sad :( does anyone else feel that way? it's especially sad that this is all because of some historical events 500 years ago...Jesus loves all these people and wants them to come into the Church, but they're being taught against it

I believe it's not their fault at all, but rather what they've been taught.. but that's what makes the Reformation tragic


#2

Some Protestants love Jesus and serve the poor and live lives more readily charitable than either I or many other Catholics who have the assistance of the Blessed Sacrament or Blessed Mother.

So yes, that makes me sad - sad that I and many others can’t more fervently trust in the Lord.


#3

I agree that many Protestants love God, and I know Protestants who love God more than I do.

But that doesn’t make me less sad, cause …well if they deserve to be Catholic more, and yet are kept away from the Church by others, I believe that grieves God. If we love someone, we want the best for them… I love my Protestant friends so I want them to experience the Eucharist too


#4

The unity of the Church is important, and the availability of the Eucharist to everyone is important too, but I don’t think we should be lamenting our Protestant brothers and sisters who do have a deep and committed relationship with Jesus when Christianity in all its forms is being extinguished in countries that don’t allow religious diversity, when Christians in the Holy Land are migrating outside in droves, and when (according to USA Today) 1/5 of Catholics in the United States believe in reincarnation.


#5

I guess I'd have to disagree :(
I mean, I agree with you that we should be glad Protestants believe in and know Christ when there's so much unbelief out there. In fact, there were times when I found great unity with my Protestant brothers and sisters through that.:thumbsup:

but when I think of the Eucharist.. I feel sorrow as well.


#6

I agree with Monica. It's surreal when I think about all of the components of faith I was missing before I decided to convert. It's a pity that people who love the Lord so much only have half of the picture. That may sound elitist, but it's true.


#7

I know what you mean.

Our Protestant brothers and sisters do love God, but they are missing the ‘fullness of faith’. They see only so far but they can not see any further - they are “looking through a glass darkly”, if I can borrow the words of St. Paul.

As a protestant that came over to the other side (:)), I can say that I know how you are feeling. Let us pray for all of them - that we might finally be reunited once again.


#8

[quote="Monica4316, post:1, topic:180326"]
I see so many Protestants who love God, but being deceived by some false teachings and kept away from the Eucharist and Mary.. it really makes me sad :( does anyone else feel that way? it's especially sad that this is all because of some historical events 500 years ago...Jesus loves all these people and wants them to come into the Church, but they're being taught against it

I believe it's not their fault at all, but rather what they've been taught.. but that's what makes the Reformation tragic

[/quote]

Yes. I was in a church full of Protestants tonight, listening to Christmas carols, probably the only Catholic there. I felt brokenness all around me, the divisions that separate them from the fullness of truth. It was pretty wrenching. I felt very much like the odd man out, though I know many of them have great relationships with Jesus. Just not full unity, and those divisions are wounds in the Body of Christ. According to St. Faustina, these heresies that wound the unity of the Church are wounds Jesus literally suffered in His flesh at Calvary.

It is horribly sad. I pray about this all the time. It is in Mary that we must rely for the healing of the Body. We pray to her, then she goes to her Spouse the Holy Spirit, and He powerfully reaches hearts.


#9

That is very sad :frowning:
I know what you mean about the brokenness. It’s odd that sometimes we can actually feel that… and just makes it more horrible.


#10

[quote="wxboss, post:7, topic:180326"]
I know what you mean.

Our Protestant brothers and sisters do love God, but they are missing the 'fullness of faith'. They see only so far but they can not see any further - they are "looking through a glass darkly", if I can borrow the words of St. Paul.

As a protestant that came over to the other side (:)), I can say that I know how you are feeling. Let us pray for all of them - that we might finally be reunited once again.

[/quote]

I'm not disagreeing with you, but I do think it is an elitist thing to say that our Protestant brothers and sisters are missing the fullness of the faith when so many Catholics who have the Eucharist are missing the picture to their detriment, moreso than any ignorant Protestant. What's worse than loving Jesus and not having the Eucharist, how about having the Eucharist and still living like lukewarm Protestants...or worse, like residual existentialists?

Everyone's so sad that our Protestant brothers and sisters won't come home and can't participate in "the fullness of the faith" when we ourselves don't even know what we have. Again, 1/5 of Catholics in the United States believe in reincarnation, and many cooky things besides. This "sadness" is horribly misdirected, in my opinion.


#11

I agree with you that there is very good reason to be sad about Catholics who don’t live their faith. They are definitely worse off than Protestants who do live their faith. Most of the Protestants who are serious about their faith are probably on their way to Heaven. As Vatican II said, they have sufficient grace for salvation. And the Catholics that have fallen away from the spiritual life are indeed in a very bad situation and won’t see Heaven unless they change.

I don’t think people’s grief for the divisions in Protestantism is misdirected. It’s legitimate. So is grief for fallen Catholics, for as you very rightly point out, they are often worse off.

The world is full of sin. One can feel sorry for the sins of many people’s heresy while also being sorry for the sins of fallen Catholics. One should in fact, for this is unity with the spirit of Christ, which is grieved by all sin.


#12

You are so right. If only they knew…

Father Mitch Pacwa recently commented on how the reformers were celebrating having liberated themselves from the oppressive, tyrannical Church. Well the reformers theology was much closer to Catholic than what we see today. The disturbing trend is that almost all of ‘protestantism’ has deviated so drastically from what the reformers believed. The fruits of sola scriptura, I’m sad to say.


#13

I agree this can sound elitist to people, but yea, it’s true :frowning: when I was Protestant, I always prayed to be closer to God (which I still do), but I never imagined that the Eucharist is the answer… I never thought there’s anything like that. If I had understood and believed it, I would have ran to the nearest Catholic Church, lol. Perhaps other Protestants feel the same way…the really want to know God in a fuller way, and are seeking Him… and I wish they knew that Jesus is physically present here on earth, that Mary is their Mother and is praying for them, etc.

:thumbsup:

I like what you said about Mary and the Holy Spirit :slight_smile:
I think I know how you feel, - sometimes I attend the Christian group at my university, (it’s mostly Protestant) and I feel the same way. My heart really breaks for my friends. I believe this lack of unity really hurts Christ…

I agree :frowning:


#14

[quote="Epistemes, post:10, topic:180326"]
I'm not disagreeing with you, but I do think it is an elitist thing to say that our Protestant brothers and sisters are missing the fullness of the faith when so many Catholics who have the Eucharist are missing the picture to their detriment, moreso than any ignorant Protestant.

[/quote]

I sincerely hope it's not elitist... if so, I'm sorry :(

I don't mean it that way. I know there are Catholics who have the Eucharist but don't care about it. But they still have access to the fullness of truth... even if they're not seeing it. Protestants have been cut away from it not because of anything they have done, not because of lack of effort or love or faith, but because of events that happened 500 years ago. It's not their fault at all.. that's why they can still be great Christians and can make it to Heaven (and I'm sure there are Protestants who would have more reward in Heaven than me..in a way, and God does judge us more - cause of all we've been given.) but it just makes me sad thinking how some people are even taught to reject the Church.. they are going from church to church, trying to find the truth, often sincerely..

What's worse than loving Jesus and not having the Eucharist, how about having the Eucharist and still living like lukewarm Protestants...or worse, like residual existentialists?

for an individual's salvation, it's worse to have the Eucharist yet still be lukewarm, I believe. (so may the Lord have mercy on me a sinner :()

but imagine if all the devout Protestants discovered the Eucharist! :) then they'd grow even more and maybe some will be Saints.

Everyone's so sad that our Protestant brothers and sisters won't come home and can't participate in "the fullness of the faith" when we ourselves don't even know what we have. Again, 1/5 of Catholics in the United States believe in reincarnation, and many cooky things besides. This "sadness" is horribly misdirected, in my opinion.

I feel sad about the Catholics too... like whenever I meet a fallen away or lukewarm Catholic.

[quote="Lief_Erikson, post:11, topic:180326"]
I agree with you that there is very good reason to be sad about Catholics who don't live their faith. They are definitely worse off than Protestants who do live their faith. Most of the Protestants who are serious about their faith are probably on their way to Heaven. As Vatican II said, they have sufficient grace for salvation. And the Catholics that have fallen away from the spiritual life are indeed in a very bad situation and won't see Heaven unless they change.

I don't think people's grief for the divisions in Protestantism is misdirected. It's legitimate. So is grief for fallen Catholics, for as you very rightly point out, they are often worse off.

The world is full of sin. One can feel sorry for the sins of many people's heresy while also being sorry for the sins of fallen Catholics. One should in fact, for this is unity with the spirit of Christ, which is grieved by all sin.

[/quote]

I agree

[quote="po18guy, post:12, topic:180326"]
You are so right. If only they knew...

Father Mitch Pacwa recently commented on how the reformers were celebrating having liberated themselves from the oppressive, tyrannical Church. Well the reformers theology was much closer to Catholic than what we see today. The disturbing trend is that almost all of 'protestantism' has deviated so drastically from what the reformers believed. The fruits of sola scriptura, I'm sad to say.

[/quote]

yes :(


#15

okay whenever I read this I just start crying :frowning:

it’s Our Lord’s prayer

“My prayer is not for them alone. I pray also for those who will believe in me through their message, 21that all of them may be one, Father, just as you are in me and I am in you. May they also be in us so that the world may believe that you have sent me. 22I have given them the glory that you gave me, that they may be one as we are one: 23I in them and you in me. May they be brought to complete unity to let the world know that you sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me. 24"Father, I want those you have given me to be with me where I am, and to see my glory, the glory you have given me because you loved me before the creation of the world. 25"Righteous Father, though the world does not know you, I know you, and they know that you have sent me. 26I have made you known to them, and will continue to make you known in order that the love you have for me may be in them and that I myself may be in them.”


#16

[quote="po18guy, post:12, topic:180326"]
You are so right. If only they knew...

Father Mitch Pacwa recently commented on how the reformers were celebrating having liberated themselves from the oppressive, tyrannical Church. Well the reformers theology was much closer to Catholic than what we see today. The disturbing trend is that almost all of 'protestantism' has deviated so drastically from what the reformers believed. The fruits of sola scriptura, I'm sad to say.

[/quote]

I like your signature :)

God bless


#17

John 17. This is my favorite chapter in the Bible.


#18

[quote="Monica4316, post:16, topic:180326"]
I like your signature :)

God bless

[/quote]

At mass tonight, it was lived out like it has not been in quite a while! In His Presence, I just felt an almost overwhelming peace. Incredible.


#19

One word, Justification. Catholics are more liable to receive justification and tend to go farther in that process.


#20

No it doesn’t make me sad as I consider each person has to walk their own path and the destination will not be the same for everyone. What does make me sad is people who do not walk the path or who stop walking.

Ys, I’m sure that there are some churches who teach against Catholicism (and probably any other Christian Church or religion) but I can say that in my 45 years as a Protestant I never heard any other Church being condemned or spoken against.

I have never been surprised that there are many Churches as I always thought they catered for different types of people. I always enjoyed the learned sermons of my Presbyterian Church which gave me food for thought but was put off by the music and same liturgy each week in the Anglican Church.

Don’t think its appropriate to generalise about how people become close(r) to God and what deepens this closeness. Sometimes it tells us more about ourselves than the person we are talking with.

And maybe if we talk about adding to what people have we will find them more willing to consider new ideas/aspects than telling what they have is either wrong or incomplete. Also if we talk about what we have got rather than what we consider they lack.


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