Protestants and Catholic interpretations


#1

Guys,

How do Protestants and Catholics read Scripture? Literally or symbolic?

If so, is that one of the reasons why we can’t agree on interpretation?


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]Guys,

How do Protestants and Catholics read Scripture? Literally or symbolic?

If so, is that one of the reasons why we can’t agree on interpretation?
[/quote]

What happens is the passages meant to be interpreted literally, they interpret symbolically and vice versa!

Actually, it is to be interpreted literally unless there is very good reason to view it symbolically. The literal is the primary way of looking at it. But as Catholic we are to read Scripture in light of Sacred Tradition and the Magisterium of the Church. The reason Protestants come up with goofy interpretations is because they deny both Tradition and Magisterium, so they are left with only one of the 3 essentials and with no way to interpret it except by their own understanding, which is very limited as is the case for all of us.


#3

Paris, do you have a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church? You NEED one!

CCC:

115 According to an ancient tradition, one can distinguish between two *senses *of Scripture: the literal and the spiritual, the latter being subdivided into the allegorical, moral and anagogical senses. The profound concordance of the four senses guarantees all its richness to the living reading of Scripture in the Church.

116 The literal sense is the meaning conveyed by the words of Scripture and discovered by exegesis, following the rules of sound interpretation: “All other senses of Sacred Scripture are based on the literal.”

117 The spiritual sense. Thanks to the unity of God’s plan, not only the text of Scripture but also the realities and events about which it speaks can be signs.

  1. The allegorical sense. We can acquire a more profound understanding of events by recognizing their significance in Christ; thus the crossing of the Red Sea is a sign or type of Christ’s victory and also of Christian Baptism.
  2. The moral sense. The events reported in Scripture ought to lead us to act justly. As St. Paul says, they were written “for our instruction”.
  3. The anagogical sense (Greek: anagoge, “leading”). We can view realities and events in terms of their eternal significance, leading us toward our true homeland: thus the Church on earth is a sign of the heavenly Jerusalem.

#4

[quote=mercygate]Paris, do you have a copy of the Catechism of the Catholic Church? You NEED one!

.
[/quote]

I do thank goodness! I got my own copy from RCIA! :smiley:


#5

[quote=Paris Blues]Guys,

How do Protestants and Catholics read Scripture? Literally or symbolic?

If so, is that one of the reasons why we can’t agree on interpretation?
[/quote]

It depends. The different books in the Bible were written in many different styles. For example, one should read the epistles differently than, say, the Song of Songs.

Protestants read Scripture and make it fit to their own preconceived theologies. Catholic do this too, but our preconceived theologies come from Jesus and the apostles.


#6

And that’s why we need the CC to interpret because we know that it contains the FULLNESS of Truth! Right?

Also, if the clueless reformation didn’t take place, our Protestant brothers and sisters would be with us in the FULLNESS of Truth! We would have NO wrong interpretations and people telling us the CC is the whore of bablylon, teaches false teachings, etc.


#7

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