Protestants do not really believe in Sola Scriptura

Protestants were really honest with themselves and with others, they do not really believe in scripture alone. Example(s):

  1. Altar calls at the end of a message. Not found in scripture, this Tradition.

  2. Asking Jesus into your heart bying praying a prayer. Not found in scripture, this is Tradition.

  3. Protestants do not interpet scriptures with scripture(not always) but interpet them through life circumstances and through their experiences.

  4. Protestants also execpt thier leaders “infallible” interpetation of scripture.

How do I know this, I was a protestant for 23 years before I became Catholic:thumbsup:

Which religion did you convert from?

Pentecostal/Charismatic

Actually they practice Selective Scriptura!:eek:

This is true:o

Doesn’t the book of James tell us to call the elders of the church together to pray for somebody?

  1. Asking Jesus into your heart bying praying a prayer. Not found in scripture, this is Tradition.

You’re right. But in all fairness, only a very small number of Protestants believe this.

  1. Protestants do not interpet scriptures with scripture(not always) but interpet them through life circumstances and through their experiences.

I don’t think that’s true. Most Protestants I know do interpret scripture with scripture.

  1. Protestants also execpt thier leaders “infallible” interpetation of scripture.

Again, I don’t think this is true. Every Protestant pastor I know of is held to some level of accountability for what he preaches and teaches.

Context context context…That would be James 5:14-16 which reads, [size=][FONT=“Palatino Linotype”]"[14] Is any among you sick? Let him call for the elders of the church, and let them pray over him, anointing him with oil in the name of the Lord;
[15] and the prayer of faith will save the sick man, and the Lord will raise him up; and if he has committed sins, he will be forgiven.
[16] Therefore confess your sins to one another, and pray for one another, that you may be healed. The prayer of a righteous man has great power in its effects. It has nothing to do with the application that you are making.

You’re right. But in all fairness, only a very small number of Protestants believe this.

I don’t know about that. It seems to be the prevalent theme of most mainstream n-C evangelistic literature. :shrug:

I don’t think that’s true. Most Protestants I know do interpret scripture with scripture.

Or at least that is their claim. However, it actually seems to be more a case of “interpret [selective] scripture with [selective] scripture”.

Again, I don’t think this is true. Every Protestant pastor I know of is held to some level of accountability for what he preaches and teaches.

The question is better asked, what authority actually holds him accountable within the church?[/FONT][/size]

Why not? An altar call is simply an opportunity to ask for prayer from the pastor and elders. James is talking about asking for prayer from the pastor and elders.

What’s the difference?

Or at least that is their claim. However, it actually seems to be more a case of “interpret [selective] scripture with [selective] scripture”.

I’m sorry you feel that way. It’s too bad that a Catholic finds it so hard to believe that a non-Catholic could possibly be sincere, when non-Catholics are expected to give Catholics the benefit of the doubt at every turn.

It’s funny, but literally every post a Catholic has made to me here with only one exception has included some sort of jab at me, personally, other Christians, or non-Catholic churches. Some veiled, some very open.

It’s a shame that so many Catholics feel that’s the way to communicate with non-Catholics, but it’s becoming quickly evident that this is a normal thing with you guys.

The question is better asked, what authority actually holds him accountable within the church?

The authority of the church.

If only those separated brothers and sisters who post here could experience the spiritual awakening that you did! Welcome home. Amen! Alleluia!

Seems like the context says something else. In fact, it shows that they are called to the sickbed. That’s different than responding to an altar call, which to my knowledge is not in scripture. :shrug:

I’m sorry you feel that way. It’s too bad that a Catholic finds it so hard to believe that a non-Catholic could possibly be sincere, when non-Catholics are expected to give Catholics the benefit of the doubt at every turn.

I never said that, and could you please get your feelings off your shoulder!? Good grief man! Take it as offered! :rolleyes:

It’s funny, but literally every post a Catholic has made to me here with only one exception has included some sort of jab at me, personally, other Christians, or non-Catholic churches. Some veiled, some very open.

I can’t tell, and to my knowledge I have not done so, however I did see one of yours that was pretty rude. I ignored it.

It’s a shame that so many Catholics feel that’s the way to communicate with non-Catholics, but it’s becoming quickly evident that this is a normal thing with you guys.

If you say so…

The authority of the church.

I’m gonna blow this off since it’s just farther off topic.

Look Skip, get into the discussion topic and ignore the rest. If you’re gonna take offense at every Catholic post then little will be accomplished.

That’s not what I said Skip…I’m saying that the passage that you cited doesn’t say what you are applying it to. If you can show me I’m wrong from the context of the passage then by all means do so. :shrug:

I believe that James is very clear that there should be an opportunity for people to ask for prayer from pastors and elders.

I nor the Catholic Church will have any problems with that.

I believe it says that it’s perfectly appropriate to ask the pastor and elders for prayer. If you don’t, then that’s between you and your church.

. :shrug:I nor the Catholic Church will have any problems with that.

Good. I’m glad you and your church are finally coming around.

One must remember the first rule of Sola Scriptura,that is that Scripture is to be taken literally unless it supports a Catholic doctrine. Thus a verse that says “call no man father” means all Catholics are sinning when they use that title when addressing their pastor BUT:

" I tell you the truth, unless you eat the flesh of the Son of Man and drink his blood, you have no life in you. 54Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood has eternal life, and I will raise him up at the last day. 55For my flesh is real food and my blood is real drink. 56Whoever eats my flesh and drinks my blood remains in me, and I in him. 5"

Must be taken figuratively.

Can you substantiate that statement from being in print somewhere, Bob, or is this just your opinion?

There seems to be some issues with, so called “Altar calls” which I, as a catholic, do not understand. Perhaps I simply don’t understand the concept or the objections but here is my take.
John the Baptist “Called” for the Jews to repent and be Baptized, and many came to be baptized. Again in Acts, on Pentacost, the Apostles Spoke Boldly and confidently and people came forward to be taken into the faith, something like 5000 that day I believe. Each of these instances could be considerd an “Altar Call” in my mind, since they were exhortations to repentance and baptism at the end of a message, or sermon.
The simple fact that “Altar Call” is not used in the Bible is really no argument since we also use terms that are not found in the Bible.

If my logic is flawed in the above, please correct me and explain why.

Peace
James

Well of course it’s my opinion. Do you think I was contending it was in the Catechism?

Got to check out some of the other threads in CAF. For instance there is one going on right now about the perpetual virginity of Mary were the adherents to Sola Scripture define it differently every time they get backed into a corner.

I noticed my protestant friends correcting each other about the bible for years. Whenever I would mention a verse in the bible I thought was ample proof that the bible was completely contradictory or where I saw other percieved errors in it, they all gave me different stories to explain it away. I suppose that can happen with catholics also though.

This is why we are blessed to have the Church and 2000 years of tradition and teachings to use in addition to Scripture.

Well, that does appeal to me a great deal. It gives me a feeling like there is something there to stop the train from running totally off the tracks if someone is way off on their interpretation.

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