Protestants do you wear crucifixes?


#1

I’m just curious on how many protestants out there either wear or own a crucifix. I have an uncle who is non-denominational and he finds crucifixes to be insulting to Christ. I’m sure he has some misunderstandings as to why Catholics wear crucifixes and have one above the church’s alter.


#2

If they have 1Corinthians 1:23 in their bibles they do.


#3

Methodists do not have them, Im not sure why


#4

I know of Episcopalians and Lutherans that wear them.


#5

I was raised Protestant and we never did. I asked my mom once why catholics use the crucifix and we didn’t, and she told me that she didn’t know and that I should ask our minister. The minister told me that most Protestant groups reject the crucifix because Jesus was resurrected, and the empty cross was a representation of a risen savior.


#6

Hopefully your minister never had a nativity scene as many Protestants have since Jesus in not in the manger anymore either!! :wink:


#7

Maybe it’s because it’s ok to have one. The “words” of 1 Corinthians 1:23 are symbols in language form, and the crucifix is a visual of the same event. There can never be a resurrection without a crucifixion. I see that you are becoming Catholic so this response is not for you but for others here who may not know.


#8

I have heard that rationale many times but an empty cross is just an image of a Roman execution device.

To depict a risen Christ, the symbol of an empty tomb would be more apprpriate.


#9

I am a Protestant and many forum members may already know that I want to convert to and embrace the Catholic faith, but am at the present moment, unable to do so because of my staunchly anti-Catholic Grandparents and some other family members.

But I WILL one day convert.

Due to the serious state of my late twin Sister’s health and her passing away as a baby, we were both baptised as babies but I still do not know and may never know the denomination that we were baptised into as we were baptised in the room (or ward) that our Mother was in as my twin Sister was too ill to be moved and for us to go down to the hospital chapel and my Dad was persuaded by my Grandmother to get us baptised but (as she is very anti-Catholic) ordered my Dad to not get us baptised by a Catholic Priest or Chaplain…

I used to wear a Celtic ‘cross’ as I was pressurised into wearing one by my Grandmother (who was baptised and raised in the Church of England (where she would have seen the bare Cross as well as the Crucifix) and also went to a Methodist Church and Congregational Church (where she would have seen the bare Cross) until she moved up to Scotland and joined the Presbyterian Church of Scotland which mainly uses the Celtic ‘cross’ although some use the Christian Cross). It was my Grandmother who also pressurised my Grandfather (who is not religious to wear a Celtic ‘cross’ as he is a Scotchman.

My Grandmother uses her Celtic ‘cross’ for a disgusting bad habit; picking her teeth as well as for promoting her ‘Scottishness’ as she is married to my Grandfather who also wears his to promote his Scottishness.

It was when I read on the Internet about the history, symbolism and the meaning of the Celtic ‘cross’ that I saw that it was once a Pagan symbol, has become Pagan again (with it’s association with Neo-Pagans such as Druids and Wiccans etc.) and has also become a racist symbol as there are loads of Neo-Nazi, Neo-Facist, White Supremacist and Race-Hate groups and organisations who have adopted and use the Celtic ‘cross’ as their logo.

From that moment onwards, I stopped wearing the Celtic ‘cross’ and therefore wanted nothing more to do with it and I started to wear a Christian Cross (or bare Cross), but I now have around my neck a Crucifix.

My Grandparents do not know that I wear a Crucifix and also have in my possession 2 Christian Crosses but I think that they may have seen my Crucifix, but as of yet, have not said anything.

Despite the fact that they (as Church of Scotland members) see the Crucifix and Christian Cross as Catholic, Coptic, Orthodox Christian and Church of England along with some other Christian denominations that use the Christian Cross and the Crucifix, they also do not like anything that is and I quote them “not of our Church”, “not in our Church” and “does not happen in our Church”.

I am not anti-Catholic, never have been and never will be.

I know many Protestants have an issue with regards to the Crucifix, but I, also a Protestant, do not.

For me, the Crucifix is the most powerful symbol in Christianity.

It visually emphasises the Greatest Sacrifice ever made by any person, (even greater than the sacrifices made by military service-men and women and the men and women of the emergency services), the Sacrifice that was made for ALL of us.

It symbolises the love and forgiveness that Our Lord Jesus had and still has for ALL of us.

Most Protestants forget that ever since the Medieval times when many people could not read or write that the Crucifix told those people about what Jesus did upon the Cross and that it still does so to this day and will continue to do so for the future.

The Crucifix has the power to draw people closer to the Lord, to be thankful to him for what he endured while upon the cross and to fill people’s hearts with love for him.

The bare Cross has no meaning, the Crucifix does!

The Crucifix may be believed to be associated with Catholicism but I believe that you do not have to be a Catholic to wear a Crucifix.

The Cross that Jesus was crucified upon probably did not remain standing for long after the body of Jesus was taken down from it.

I love the Crucifix and do not have anything against it.

Emma Jane Gordon


#10

I have a couple rosaries given to me by family members who’s Catholic relatives died.

I don’t wear any jewelry…so the answer would be “No”.


#11

I do, and most of the Lutherans at our parish do. We have a crucifix on our altar as well.


#12

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.