Protestants, it says so in the Bible!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


#1

In James 5:14-15, it says:

  • 14 ** Is anyone among you sick? 6 He should summon the presbyters of the church, and they should pray over him and anoint (him) with oil in the name of the Lord,** 15 ** and the prayer of faith will save the sick person, and the Lord will raise him up. If he has committed any sins, he will be forgiven

*It mentions oil in there and that’s exactly what the CC does, the Anointing of the Sick as a Sacrament. :slight_smile:

So my question to you Protestants is, where’s your oil??? Why don’t you use oil to do that since you do and believe whatever it says in the Bible? :smiley:

Or do many Protestants overlook the word oil or something?

Anyone want to take a stand at this?


#2

Well, in many Charismatic and Evangelical churches, that’s exactly what gets done, just not in as systematic a way. Quite often, a church elder or family head (citing the priesthood/eldership of the believer) will do it for a person who is sick or in some other sort of state. Usually, they claim as authority precisely the verse you cited. Can’t speak for mainline Protestant churches.

(Blast–I was going to end that next-to-last sentence with an exclamation point, but I think the OP used 'em all. Good thing my trusty parentheses haven’t run out…oh, fooh.


#3

Some protestants (I believe) actually don’t believe the Letter of James is validly part of the Bible - mainly because it talks about the importance of works as well as faith for salvation, which is anathema to most protestants.


#4

[quote=Paris Blues]In James 5:14-15, it says:
*14 Is anyone among you sick? 6 He should summon the presbyters of the church, and they should pray over him and anoint (him) with oil in the name of the Lord, 15 *and the prayer of faith will save the sick person, and the Lord will raise him up. If he has committed any sins, he will be forgiven

It mentions oil in there and that’s exactly what the CC does, the Anointing of the Sick as a Sacrament. :slight_smile:

So my question to you Protestants is, where’s your oil??? Why don’t you use oil to do that since you do and believe whatever it says in the Bible? :smiley:

Or do many Protestants overlook the word oil or something?

Anyone want to take a stand at this?
[/quote]

A lot of Protestants – particularly Pentecostals – use buckets of oil in their healing services.

Get a grip girl, you’re using up all the exclamation points. Leave some for the rest of us, will ya?


#5

Well, I certainly don’t remember using oil when I attended a Protestant church before becoming Catholic but I guess that’s my fault for attending a church like that…oh well. It tells you how ignorant I am!:smiley:

Mercygate, I don’t know if the tone was sarcastic, angry, friendly or nonchalant?? I’m thinking it was…who knows!


#6

[quote=LilyM]Some protestants (I believe) actually don’t believe the Letter of James is validly part of the Bible - mainly because it talks about the importance of works as well as faith for salvation, which is anathema to most protestants.
[/quote]

I have heard this attributed to Luther but I have never heard anyone say that, any sources or particular groups that you know of.

Like Le Cracquere said, many people do the annointing with oil.
BH


#7

[quote=Paris Blues]Well, I certainly don’t remember using oil when I attended a Protestant church before becoming Catholic but I guess that’s my fault for attending a church like that…oh well. It tells you how ignorant I am!:smiley:

Mercygate, I don’t know if the tone was sarcastic, angry, friendly or nonchalant?? I’m thinking it was…who knows!
[/quote]

It was a friendly tease.:wink:


#8

[quote=Paris Blues]In James 5:14-15, it says:
*14 Is anyone among you sick? 6 He should summon the presbyters of the church, and they should pray over him and anoint (him) with oil in the name of the Lord, 15 *and the prayer of faith will save the sick person, and the Lord will raise him up. If he has committed any sins, he will be forgiven

It mentions oil in there and that’s exactly what the CC does, the Anointing of the Sick as a Sacrament. :slight_smile:

So my question to you Protestants is, where’s your oil??? Why don’t you use oil to do that since you do and believe whatever it says in the Bible? :smiley:

Or do many Protestants overlook the word oil or something?

Anyone want to take a stand at this?
[/quote]

None of the churches that I attended did this, but I have heard of some that do. It would be a good verse to be able to explain the anointing of the sick to a person who does not understand though.

It would be interesting to know which nonCatholic churches do the annoiting of the sick. Does anyone know?


#9

That’s an extremely nit-picky thing to focus on, I think.


#10

Hmmmmm…

Well it’s amazing how Protestants do everything in the Bible except believe John 6 about the Eucharist.

I think that’s so strange…:ehh:


#11

[quote=Liberalsaved]That’s an extremely nit-picky thing to focus on, I think.
[/quote]

It is not nitpicky, just curious.


#12

[quote=deb1]It is not nitpicky, just curious.
[/quote]

Ah. I misconstrued this as an attempt to prove protestants wrong then. My apologies.


#13

My Father and Stepmother annointed my KJV study bible and prayed over it in hopes that I would convert back to Protestantism. They were completely horrified to find out that I use the KJV to debate against Protestants with. It was a look of Sacrilege upon their faces…


#14

The Congregational Holiness Church I grew up in had a bottle of Virgin Olive Oil to do the annointing with.

The would pour some on a cloth and pray over it and have the woman put it under the mattress pad of their husband who never attended church. I witnessed this on several occasions. It never produced any results.


#15

[quote=Paris Blues]Hmmmmm…

Well it’s amazing how Protestants do everything in the Bible except believe John 6 about the Eucharist.

I think that’s so strange…:ehh:
[/quote]

In the first place a significant number of Protestants don’t believe that John 6 has anything to do with the Eucharist. They see the references to bread as being on a par with Christ’s references to Himself as Living Water in John Chapter 4. Both passages are seen as affirmations by Christ of His own Deity, with a contrast being made between the Samaritans (who accepted Christ’s claims willingly) and Jewish people (who rejected Him).

That aside: Lutherans and Anglicans believe in the Real Presence of Christ, though they reject the doctrine of transubstantiation as an adequate explanation thereof. (The concept of ‘cosubstantiation’, although used by Catholics to distinguish between Lutheran versus Roman Catholic ideas of how Christ is really present in the Eucharist, is NOT a term used by many Lutherans, I think). Anglicans like to say something like:

His were the hand that bread did brake;
His were the Word that spake;
And what that Word did make it,
This I believe and take it.

And many Protestants believe that Christ is really, specially, and uniquely present and spiritually received by communicants during Holy Communion services; and because of that can be likened in some fashion to bread and wine. They just don’t believe that Christ somehow becomes part of the elements of the physical bread and wine used in those services.

A great many churches I have been in do in fact appoint either the minister or a group of elders to do hospital visitations for the purpose of praying for and encouraging the sick and elderly. In most cases oil is available if the person requests it, and in some denominations (especially Pentecostals) the use of annointing oil is very common. Some such groups even use it during regular worship, during what is frequently deemed a ‘healing service’.


#16

[quote=Paris Blues]Hmmmmm…
Well it’s amazing how Protestants do everything in the Bible except believe John 6 about the Eucharist.
I think that’s so strange…:ehh:
[/quote]

John 6:66
From that time many of his disciples went back, and walked no more with him.

Coincidence that those who refused his teaching on this no longer walk with christ and may have taken the mark of the beast 6:66? :eek:

It’s just intriguing to me that verse has that numbering. : :hmmm:


#17

If you’ll pardon me a bit of snideness, that’s because it’s superstitious nonsense. People have to make a choice about faith, you can not make them do something they do not want to do with something like that.


#18

[quote=Liberalsaved]If you’ll pardon me a bit of snideness, that’s because it’s superstitious nonsense. People have to make a choice about faith, you can not make them do something they do not want to do with something like that.
[/quote]

I didn’t say I believed it. But the power of faith allowed the woman with an Issue to be healed just by merely touching the hem of Christ’s garment. Just like all the miracles at Lourdes. Are they real miracles or is it just the extreme self faith that you actually heal yourself by believing in nothing else.


#19

Luther said that James was an Epistle of Straw.

That didn’t mean that he thought that it was non-Scriptural: it was just Luther being overly phobic towards works as he tended to be… The thing is is that Luther fought against the scrupulosity of looking at works but he replaced it with a scrupulosity of avoiding any mention of works and in doing so in my opinion he is guilty of what he was trying to avoid.

"If I had to do without one or the other-either the works or preaching of Christ-I would rather do without his works than his preaching. For the works do not help me, but His words give life, as He Himself says. Now John writes very little about the works of Christ, but very much about His preaching. The other Evangelists write much of His works and little of His preaching. Therefore, John’s Gospel is the one, tender, true chief Gospel far, far to be preferred to the other three and placed high above them. So, too, the epistles of St. Paul and St. Peter far surpass the other three Gospels, Matthew, Mark and Luke.

In a word, St. John’s Gospel and his first Epistle, St. Paul’s Epistles, especially Romans, Galatians, and Ephesians, and St. Peter’s first Epistle are the books that show you Christ and that teach you all that is necessary and good for you to know, even though you never see or hear any other book or doctrine. Therefore, St. James’ Epistle is really an epistle of straw, compared to them; for it has nothing of the nature of the gospel in it."

I of course disagree with Luther and so did many Protestants.


#20

Oh I forgot to answer the main question…

It isn’t that the Protestants do not anoint the sick it is that they have a much narrower view of what constitutes a sacrament.


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