Protestants Why? Part II


#1

Protestants Why commenced with this question

This question could have been asked already, but I’ll ask it anyway. Why are you Protestant? What about the Catholic Church do you not agree with and why?

and the second to the last posting was this…

So, it’s not that a person is wrong because of the guidance of the fallible leaders belonging to the CC but rather because of the guidance of the Holy Spirit?

Eric Hilbert ended the thread with this…

Joe gets the last word.
Thanks to all for participating.
Feel free to open a sequel thread.

You read the book, you saw the movie, and now it is here live…for your continued discussion…Protestants Why Part II…take it away…:clapping:


#2

sequels are never as good as the first :stuck_out_tongue: But I’ll join in anyway hehe

I’m a protestant because I was raised as one, made the faith my own and see no reason to leave. I have Christ, I have a warm spiritual family, what more could I need?


#3

Hi

I had already been seeking God ,and when we moved to a new area, we were were invited by the local Presbyterian Minister to attend Church.We were welcomed and we have been going for twelve years now.
However I have recently changed employment and my new co worker is Catholic.( she has been sharing her faith, I have become very interested, hence joining this board )

Heather


#4

I wasn’t expecting to see another church of scotland here :smiley: I recently switched from being baptist to Church of Scotland


#5

Why did you leave the Baptist church?


#6

A variety of reasons I think. I grew up baptist, but found over time my views changed towards presbyterianism more and more. For example the issue of baptism. I didn’t like how most baptist churches wouldn’t let someone become a full member of the church unless they had been baptised as a believer, I came to the conclusion infant baptism is valid and there’s no need to rebaptise. Planning for marriage with my beloved I knew she couldn’t be happy in a baptist church, since she wanted to become a full member without being rebaptised. I’d also moved towards a sacramental theology in terms of the Eucharist and baptism and away from the mere memorialism. To be fair the older baptist confessions held to this view too, but most modern baptists have unfortunately dropped this bar a few. And then there was the issue of government. I felt baptist churches were too independant and isolated, I liked how presbyterian churches were united under one confession and a general assembly. A general assembly is a good thing since it allows the national church to have a national voice. I firmly believe in the idea of a christian nation. Ideally the government should recognise the Christ as Lord over the nation and therefore nationally recognise the church who looks after the people, the idea of dividing the areas into parishes is a good way to do this. And then there is the history. I considered people like Calvin, Knox, Wishart, McCheyne as heroes of the faith. I connected more to presbyterian history than I did with baptist. I have always had a love for the national Kirk.and am happy at the church of scotland I attend. their warmth and attention to visitors was second to none.I immediately felt I belonged.

I shoudl probably mention I still have connections with my old baptist church, it’s a good church and my baptist elder still meets up with me for coffee and chat to see how I’m doing. :thumbsup:


#7

I hope to visit your beautiful country some day.


#8

[quote="Porknpie, post:7, topic:297051"]
I hope to visit your beautiful country some day.

[/quote]

You should! Best country in the world! (Although I admit I'm slightly biased :D )

If you ever visit you should visit St Andrews, a beautiful city with a lovely beach and a fascinating place for church history!


#9

Protos,

Growth and maturation.


#10

very true, I’m getting that too :thumbsup:


#11

Hi Protos,

I wasn't expecting to find a fellow Chruch of Scotland member on here either :) what a small world!
I agree with you about the Church of Scotland, I like the way it is organised too.I don't know any thing about the Baptist church, or any other Church really, never attended any Kirk until twelve years ago .


#12

Protos,

Good,

Then you can aim for the fullness of the knowledge of Christ, the Church he founded, the Bible that the Church he founded produced, the fullness of the Faith that you have and an understanding of what the bible says…

The Church is the Pillar and foundation of truth…
The Church is the means by which the manifold wisdom of God is known…

So if you want the fullness of truth…and I believe you do…and seek the manifold wisdom of God…and I believe you do…then you need to have knowledge of what God has done…because the Bible says so…

18For the wrath of God is revealed from heaven against all ungodliness and unrighteousness of men who suppress the **truth **in unrighteousness, 19because that which is known about God is evident within them; for God made it evident to them. 20For since the creation of the world His invisible attributes, His eternal power and divine nature, have been clearly seen, being understood through what has been made, so that they are without excuse.

As a Christian you are duty bound to know the truth, because God made it known and evident by what has been made in the World…he created the universe, stars, and a Church…

Seek the truth…unless you believe that you are filled and need none


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