Protestants


#1

What are the protestants protesting about? :confused: :confused:


#2

Authority.


#3

[quote=Steve M]Authority.
[/quote]

Authority usurped without sufficient Biblical citations (besides one passage Mt. 16:18 - the meaning of which is arguable) and sufficient reasoning to back it up.


#4

[quote=Jacques Parent]What are the protestants protesting about? :confused: :confused:
[/quote]

Jacques,

Most aren’t protesting anything. Their forefathers (Luther and others) protested abuses and sought reform. When challenged with the abuses - excommunication followed instead of reform within.

That’s the short answer. There are other good threads around that speak volumes on this issue.


#5

Where do I begin?

Matters of:

  1. Faith

  2. Grace

  3. Sovereignty

  4. Scripture

  5. Glory only to God

  6. Authority

etc…

There are more, and of the one’s I’ve given, you can break them down into thousands of individual misgivings.


#6

Protestant is the term used to refer generally to non-Catholic Christians. Some Protestants may not like to be referred generally in contrast to the Catholic Church, but there doesn’t appear to be a better term that suits the need to have such a term.


#7

[quote=ahimsaman72]Authority usurped without sufficient Biblical citations (besides one passage Mt. 16:18 - the meaning of which is arguable) and sufficient reasoning to back it up.
[/quote]

Usurped by whom? The Church that gave the Bible to the world in the first place, out of its Sacred Tradition? Don’t be silly. :whacky:


#8

The protestant reformation became more of a revolt against both the Catholic Church and the various kings throughout Western and Northern Europe. It started with Luther pointing out some corruption within the Church hierarcy, real are imagined is not the point. Both sides went to extreme positions. That’s when Luther suddenly “rediscovered” the teachings that he said had been lost within the Catholic Church. This “rediscovery” was, in reality a new creation. He originally did not want to start a new church. Both sides acted poorly otherwise it could have possibly been resolved early on.

When the people saw his break with the authority of the Church, they naturally assumed they could break from their earthly authority, their kings. These peasant revolts were violently put down, but the camel had it’s nose under the tent. The idea of being free from a higher authority, whether spiritual or temporal, began to rapidly spread. There was a lot of violence from both sides during the reformation era.

This is what I mean by authority, not just the authority of the Church.


#9

Luther wasn’t excommunicated over the issue of doctrinal abuses in the church. It was because he was teaching heresy. He had been warned time and time again, but refused to give it up. Once he was excommunicate, he then took it upon himself to point out the “error” in the church.

Yes, things weren’t handled well on either side. But Luther took it too far. He was the one who brought up the idea that we could interpret scripture for ourselves. Funny thing was, it was only if our interpretation agreed with his!! He literally became his own pope. And it’s been said that on his death bed Luther asked for a priest.


#10

[quote=La Chiara]Protestant is the term used to refer generally to non-Catholic Christians. Some Protestants may not like to be referred generally in contrast to the Catholic Church, but there doesn’t appear to be a better term that suits the need to have such a term.
[/quote]

I have to make a minor correction. Not all non-Catholic Christians are called Protestant. We must keep in mind the Orthodox. They are Christian, and non-Catholic, but certainly are not Protestant. God bless,

Cocamo Joe


#11

[quote=Della]Usurped by whom? The Church that gave the Bible to the world in the first place, out of its Sacred Tradition? Don’t be silly. :whacky:
[/quote]

I have found this point interesting. I have encountered people that believed the Catholic Church added chapters to “their” Bible, instead of realizing that Luther decided to remove chapters that did not agree with his thinking.


#12

[quote=Della]Usurped by whom? The Church that gave the Bible to the world in the first place, out of its Sacred Tradition? Don’t be silly. :whacky:
[/quote]

Well, silly is in the eye of the beholder, isn’t it? Surely you jest.


#13

[quote=Christy Beth]Luther wasn’t excommunicated over the issue of doctrinal abuses in the church. It was because he was teaching heresy. He had been warned time and time again, but refused to give it up. Once he was excommunicate, he then took it upon himself to point out the “error” in the church.

Yes, things weren’t handled well on either side. But Luther took it too far. He was the one who brought up the idea that we could interpret scripture for ourselves. Funny thing was, it was only if our interpretation agreed with his!! He literally became his own pope. And it’s been said that on his death bed Luther asked for a priest.
[/quote]

This really encompasses alot and I think has been debated on other threads, but I will make a few comments here. Luther’s 95 theses (if you read it) encompasses indulgence abuse. He proposed an open debate about the issue - which nobody was inclined to do. Then everything hit the fan. And he didn’t teach heresy before being excommunicated. After the ordeal, he began to show differences in theology. His becoming his own pope and asking for a priest are mere hearsay. Propaganda in order to justify a position.


#14

[quote=ahimsaman72]Luther’s 95 theses (if you read it) encompasses indulgence abuse. He proposed an open debate about the issue - which nobody was inclined to do.
[/quote]

I’m not defending Luther at all, but some people thing it was a terrible thing to post the 95 theses. Posting them the way he did was absolutely an accepted practice at the time. It was the way to start a debate. You throw a question to all that might be interested in responding by posting it in a very public place.


#15

[quote=Steve M]I’m not defending Luther at all, but some people thing it was a terrible thing to post the 95 theses. Posting them the way he did was absolutely an accepted practice at the time. It was the way to start a debate. You throw a question to all that might be interested in responding by posting it in a very public place.
[/quote]

But for a Catholic priest to do so in order to challenge the Catholic Church? Even if posting theses was an “accepted practice”, I would think it was still heretical for a Catholic priest to resolve his issues with the Church in this way.


#16

[quote=La Chiara]But for a Catholic priest to do so in order to challenge the Catholic Church? Even if posting theses was an “accepted practice”, I would think it was still heretical for a Catholic priest to resolve his issues with the Church in this way.
[/quote]

It was an academic issue at the outset. That wast the way to start any kind of academic discussion. Since the uinversities were generally run by the Church, it was not considered improper. It’s hard for us to put ourselves in that time period. If you read some of the vitriolic statements that went back and fourth, today they would seem horrible. In 16th Germany, that was the way things were discussed. Things did eventually did get out of hand, but at the outset, it wasn’t abnormal behavior. Even for a priest.


#17

[quote=Jacques Parent]What are the protestants protesting about? :confused: :confused:
[/quote]

Nothing now since the Vatican has no authority over us. Rome can practice and teach anything she wants-it doesn’t mean we have to accept it.

Personally, I prefer just being referred to as a Christian.


#18

[quote=ahimsaman72]Jacques,

Most aren’t protesting anything. Their forefathers (Luther and others) protested abuses and sought reform. When challenged with the abuses - excommunication followed instead of reform within.

That’s the short answer. There are other good threads around that speak volumes on this issue.
[/quote]

So when the Council of Trent corrected those abuses, why didn’t they come home?


#19

What does Luther think about things like the homsexual ordination in Scottish Episcopal Church, or the current position of abortion of many churches? I think that he wouldn´t love this.


#20

[quote=Becky]Nothing now since the Vatican has no authority over us. Rome can practice and teach anything she wants-it doesn’t mean we have to accept it.

Personally, I prefer just being referred to as a Christian.
[/quote]

you sound like your proud of the fact that you openly reject the Church that Christ started to follow an “organization” started by some “guy”…

WE don’t have to accept the practices and teachings of Christ, but we all know there’s Hell to pay for that :wink:


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