PRS guitars? Any fellow owners on the forum


#1

Really stupid question here, I know we have some fellow guitar players. I picked up a PRS guitar at a trade show at a big reduction. Has anyone here got any experience of playing their instruments. I’ve never owned one of their gutiars before as I tended to associate them with ‘dentists who play blues’. I’m actually liking it quite a lot but wondering have we got anyone else here who has owned one who has any tips on ideal setup etc. for them.


#2

There is a forum dedicated to these instruments, a thread on how to spot fakes (I’m the world’s biggest skeptic!!)


#3

In this case I’m not worried about it been fake (although like Gibson there are tonnes of fake ones) as this was an official trade show and this was PRS’s British distribution end selling. They weren’t overly keen on doing discounts as several staff members had brought along a husband or partner who was taking advantage of this at the venue. I actually started of looking for a better acoustic but I am left-handed and the only company with a decent range of acoustics was a company from which I already own a guitar and nothing they had on display took my fancy.


#4

I’ve never had one, although I love the descriptive category of ‘dentists who play blues’ and I know what you mean. Incidentally, my dentist does play guitar, and he 's pretty good, actually.


#5

I’ll do a picture at some point and throw it up. He actually had two left handers on the stand on the left corner and i started out looking at the sunburst but the blue one was hidden behind this somewhat which is why it had escaped attention as it was displayed on a stand that could be rotated and it was at the bottom and since these were their SE models which are the bottom of the tree price wise they weren’t really focussing on trying to sell them so much. They were more interested trying to sell the real high end instruments for several thousand pounds. They did pretty good at that as well as they had one of the biggest stands and the greatest range of models and stock. Fender had a pain in the head stand which was very difficult to navigate and you had no room to try out an instrument easily and they had far too many lifestyle products like overpriced headphones. I am not paying two hundred quid for any headphones, no matter what it says on the size. Vox amplifiers had a great stand as well. Many of the others could have learned lessons about laying out things. Marshall was terrible as it had girls who were plainly hired models in tight t-shirts for the day. Obviously guys asking them questions were not going to buy when the girls couldn’t answer basic questions. Some other stands had girls running them but they plainly were there out of interest. Also, there’s little point trying to sell 4 x 10 guitar amp cabinets and amps at a trade show in central London as you’d either have to arrange for them to be delivered or get a vehicle to take it home. You might as well buy it another day. They neglected to have any of their smaller models their for purchase which killed their sales. For such a big company they didn’t have a lot of people visiting their stand.


#6

This topic was automatically closed 14 days after the last reply. New replies are no longer allowed.


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.