Purgatory and the sufficiency of Christ

Mikenerin asked: Can somebody start a new thread called pugatory and the sufficiency of Christ?

Here you go:)

Such would be a kind of common misquoting of that verse about being absent from the body -

watch please Jimmy Akin of Catholic Anwers: jimmyakin.com/2012/06/to-be-absent-from-the-body-is-to-be-present-with-the-lord.html (Tis also about Purgatory.)

It is JESUS CHRIST - is who is at work in that final purification - not me.

As Revelation notes - nothing unclean can enter heaven…

It is HIS **application **in a final way of the redemption of the cross - to our souls.

It is his application…

Purgatory is not event that is disconnected from Christ and his passion and death and resurrection.

Just as* Faith *is not something that is disconnected from Christ …nor is baptism…

Shall we start saying that faith and baptism contradicts the more than sufficiency of Christ?

No.

It is Christ too who is the author and perfecter our faith…and it is Christ who baptizes…

and such rather involves Christs death and resurrection!

Tis all from him and by him…and his pascal mystery.

(And of course the Father and the Holy Spirit are also involved!)

catholiceducation.org/en/religion-and-philosophy/apologetics/purgatory-holy-fire.html

Purgatory: Holy Fire
SCOTT HAHN
Scott Hahn discusses the Catholic doctrine of purgatory and how it is necessary in understanding the application of Christ’s redemptive work in salvation.

Quotes on the sufficiency of Christ:

Non-Catholics frequently fall in the trap of saying, Christ obeyed, so we don’t need to. Paul said Christ obeyed to enable us to do what previously was humanly impossible. Finally now, heart obedient to a motive of faith, hope and love is made possible by Christ’s obedience, not made unnecessary. It’s made acceptable in Christ and it’s made delightful to the Father because it’s presented in union with Christ.

“I rejoice in my sufferings for your sake, and in my flesh I complete what is lacking in Christ’s afflictions for the sake of His body that is the Church.”

Now does he mean that Christ died a little too quickly? He needed a few more hours? No. It means that Christ’s suffering and death must be reproduced and filled up in the Church and if some are slacking off, that means others must become more like victim-souls, willing to bear a greater burden, willing to shoulder with love, as Galatians 5 speaks about the love, “Love bears one another’s burdens.” We do that just as 1st John 5 speaks about how we can pray for others and get them back on track after their venial sins have been committed. So likewise we can suffer on behalf of others. That’s what fathers and mothers do all the time. And God calls us to do that in the supernatural family, as well, on behalf of our brothers and sisters and our spiritual children, as well. That’s what Paul takes for granted when he makes such an outlandish statement. Outlandish only for those who do not recognize the essential need for suffering…Now what does this mean, that Christ has not paid for our sin? Of course not. It doesn’t mean that. Christ has paid once and for all for our sin. His death is the ultimate satisfaction and price for our redemption, but His life and His death must be lived out in us. That’s why we need to pick up our cross, and we need to imitate Christ. Did you catch that? We don’t suffer because Christ’s sufferings weren’t enough. We suffer because Christ’s life must be reproduced in us. It is finished. It is accomplished, but now it must be applied. The work of the third person of the Holy Spirit is New Testament history, is personal history.

I have read too many books on the Saints who discuss purgatory. Then there is Mary Mother of God who has been quoted on the subject in those same books. Add to that 2000 years of Catholic teaching.

Finally, for me, it just makes sense. Christ died to mitigate the damage of original sin for starters. To simply believe in once saved always saved makes no sense. Catholic doctrine makes much more sense in the matter, this is just me expressing my beliefs, and what I have learned.

Why would Christ make such a sacrifice only to clear the way for his followers to live a life of wickedness? Believing in Christ is only the start. Why have confession if we were not held responsible for at least some part of our actions. We are forgiven most certainly, but we have to work hard at not sinning, to lead good lives and rectify at least some of the damage our sins create. We do this through prayer and good works.

Pax vobis

Why would Christ make such a sacrifice only to clear the way for his followers to live a life of wickedness? Believing in Christ is only the start. Why have confession if we were not held responsible for at least some part of our actions. We are forgiven most certainly, but we have to work hard at not sinning, to lead good lives and rectify at least some of the damage our sins create. We do this through prayer and good works.

:thumbsup:

That’s right-the Christian faith isn’t merely a get-out-of-hell-free-card. It’s a way of life- part of the world’s “state of journeying to its ultimate perfection” as the catechism states it.

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