Purgatory is man-made....according to nonCatholics


#1

I was telling people about Purgatory and how it’s a cleaning state to wash the rest of the “dirtiness” from sin off, right?

They replied to me with:

“I would refer you to the parable of the Wedding Banquet. The groom invited all of his friends but when they made excuses and declined to come he told his servants to go out and bring in people wherever they might be found. He insisted that his wedding banquet would be filled. When the servants brought the people in the groom gave them white wedding garments and brought them in to the places of honor… and his banquet was filled. The Christian understanding of our justification is that Jesus has provided forgiveness and cleansing for our sins. We are justified and made right before God… and our sins are washed away (to use a common metaphor). In another place God says, “I shall remember your sins no more”.
This does not mean that we are perfect. It does not mean that we will not sin again. It does mean that by our confession of faith just like the thief on the cross we are made righteous by the merit of Jesus Christ and are made joint heirs with Christ. Through him we approach the Father. His justification is complete. There is no further need of sacrifices. It is the beginning of a life lived in faith in which we may grow into the likeness of Christ being sanctified by the Holy Spirit. It is a process of faith and trust in Christ who strengthens us as we are faithful and as we seek to live into Christ’s image.
The idea of purgatory, while I affirm that it may be a comforting
doctrine for some, denies the sufficiency of Christ’s oblation ( a
good Catholic term) for us and requires further justification or
purification (almost interchangeable). In other words it is not
consistent with the Apostolic teachings of the Church.
…said that the teaching could not be found in the Bible. That is true. There are many references that speak of being purified…refined… made righteous… etc… but these refer (in the classic teaching of the Catholic Church) to our justification in Christ and our lives lived in the Holy Spirit… not to purgatory or purgare (purging) in a place of torment in the afterlife… this is a
doctrine that developed out of medieval traditions that had nothing to do with the Apostolic teaching of the Catholic Church. In my humble opinion… it is one of the man made doctrines that we are warned to avoid.”

MAN-MADE?!?!? Who said it was ever man-made? How do I respond?


#2

[quote=Paris Blues]I was telling people about Purgatory and how it’s a cleaning state to wash the rest of the “dirtiness” from sin off, right?

They replied to me with:

“I would refer you to the parable of the Wedding Banquet. The groom invited all of his friends but when they made excuses and declined to come he told his servants to go out and bring in people wherever they might be found. He insisted that his wedding banquet would be filled. When the servants brought the people in the groom gave them white wedding garments and brought them in to the places of honor… and his banquet was filled. The Christian understanding of our justification is that Jesus has provided forgiveness and cleansing for our sins. We are justified and made right before God… and our sins are washed away (to use a common metaphor). In another place God says, “I shall remember your sins no more”.
This does not mean that we are perfect. It does not mean that we will not sin again. It does mean that by our confession of faith just like the thief on the cross we are made righteous by the merit of Jesus Christ and are made joint heirs with Christ. Through him we approach the Father. His justification is complete. There is no further need of sacrifices. It is the beginning of a life lived in faith in which we may grow into the likeness of Christ being sanctified by the Holy Spirit. It is a process of faith and trust in Christ who strengthens us as we are faithful and as we seek to live into Christ’s image.
The idea of purgatory, while I affirm that it may be a comforting
doctrine for some, denies the sufficiency of Christ’s oblation ( a
good Catholic term) for us and requires further justification or
purification (almost interchangeable). In other words it is not
consistent with the Apostolic teachings of the Church.
…said that the teaching could not be found in the Bible. That is true. There are many references that speak of being purified…refined… made righteous… etc… but these refer (in the classic teaching of the Catholic Church) to our justification in Christ and our lives lived in the Holy Spirit… not to purgatory or purgare (purging) in a place of torment in the afterlife… this is a
doctrine that developed out of medieval traditions that had nothing to do with the Apostolic teaching of the Catholic Church. In my humble opinion… it is one of the man made doctrines that we are warned to avoid.”

MAN-MADE?!?!? Who said it was ever man-made? How do I respond?
[/quote]

The only thing man-made about purgatory is the word itself.

He says the idea of purgatory may be comforting. What exactly is his idea of the Catholic teaching of purgatory? He talks about a place of torment in the afterlife. Is he aware that the official Catholic doctrine is does not teach whether or not purgatory is instantaneous or can go on for an unspecified time? In fact JPII said that purgatory should not be thought of as a place but more as a process.

He claims that “classic Catholic teaching” on Bible verses is not about Purgatory. Ask him to show you “classic Catholic” teaching.

catholic.com/library/Purgatory.asp

This is from CA Library. It has many of the Bible verses. Of course, he could then say that this is not “classic Catholic teaching” but show me this teaching.

I think a better way to describe it would be like this, at least I have had a more positive, (or at least the couldn’t come up with an argument against):

When we sin, it is as if we have driven a nail into our soul. Repentance removes the nail, but the sin itself left a hole in our soul. The sin even though forgiven, leaves behind the damage. Purgatory “fills in the holes” and fixes the damage that the sin left behind in our soul.


#3

10Jesus said to him, “He who has bathed does not need to wash, except for his feet, but he is clean all over; and you are clean, but not every one of you.” 11For he knew who was to betray him; that was why he said, “You are not all clean.” (John 13:10-11)
Purgatory is where those who have been washed in the blood of the Lamb and are otherwise clean all over get their feet washed.


#4

That is a great answer! :thumbsup:


#5

[quote=Todd Easton]Purgatory is where those who have been washed in the blood of the Lamb and are otherwise clean all over get their feet washed.
[/quote]

That is a great answer! :thumbsup:


#6

Nothing unclean shall enter the kingdom of heaven (Rev 21:27). “Faith alone” salvation does not believe we are improved through grace. Instead they believe Jesus in his mercy covers us, but we remain dung (to steal a word from Luther).

Other than that, follow MariaG’s advice in using the CA website.


closed #7

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