Putin bogging down in Syria


#1

Russia’s intervention has failed to gain much on the battlefield, raising hopes that diplomacy will make more progress.

Read more: politico.com/story/2015/12/vladimir-putin-russia-syria-216609#ixzz3uEZuSJVK

If you want to win on the battlefield in Syria you need to send in hundreds of thousands of troops.


#2

And what did Putin mean by that statement that he “hopes” that the nuclear option won’t be necessary?


#3

Says who, the US press? It must be all true then…:smiley:

Politico is a political journalism organization based in Arlington County, Virginia, that covers the issues, ideas and personalities behind politics and policy in the United States and in the global arena. Its content is distributed via television, the Internet, newspaper and radio. Its coverage in Washington, D.C. includes the U.S. Congress, lobbying, media and the Presidency.[3] It was a sponsor of the 2008 Republican Presidential candidates debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on May 3, 2007, the 2008 Democratic Presidential candidates debate at the Kodak Theater on January 31, 2008, and the 2012 Republican Presidential candidates debate at the Ronald Reagan Presidential Library on September 7, 2011.


#4

As expected. Air support and small scale ground support is never a game changer.


#5

There is no way to “win”. You can kill thousands upon thousands of ISIS devotees, put the entire ISIS leadership to the rope, and victory will still be uncertain.

See, for example, the “hundreds of thousands of troops” that have been sent to Afghanistan over the past 35 years.


#6

For Putin a ‘win’ would be for the Assad government to regain control of Syria. That is possible with enough troops.


#7

If the government could not regain control of Syria without the presence of massive numbers of foreign troops, then it would demand a continuing presence of troops long after Assad has “won”.

…And you’re looking at Afghanistan again.


#8

Assad has agreed to democratic elections, after the ‘fight club’ has been stopped, and Putin has stated this will occur. How could anyone else govern at this stage? :shrug:

It would be impossible to appoint someone, or an interim government, except someone who will do the bidding of all the non-Syrian groups that are wrecking Syria and/or ISIS itself will takeover - which no doubt all comes down to pipelines/oil/money/land control… but zilch to do with Assad himself.

Assad is backed by the majority of his people, in all polls taken and has received praise and full backing from Syrian Christian patriarchs.

Needless to say, this story was not headline news…in the MSM.:rolleyes:

catholicworldreport.com/Item/3570/isis_assad_and_what_the_west_is_missing_about_syria.aspx
*
Syrian Patriarch Ignace Joseph III Younan, in Rome for the recent synod on the family, told about the time the host of a French prime-time news program asked him about Syria’s “awful president,” saying, “He’s a monster. He’s killing innocent people, children and women.” To which Patriarch Younan replied with the story of a Capuchin priest from a Syrian town on the Euphrates River which is 98 percent Sunni Muslim. The Capuchin told Younan that as the town was being attacked by anti-government rebels, he sheltered four Missionaries of Charity sisters and 12 elderly women in their care within his parish center. When the situation was no longer sustainable, the Capuchin said, the nuns called Damascus. “And Damascus sent military vehicles to evacuate [them] from the parish compound—there were the nuns, 12 elderly people, and [the Capuchin], and they took all to safety, in Damascus.”

“Now,” Patriarch Younan had said to the French news-show host, “you can judge for yourself if this person, Assad, is a monster or not.”*

So it seems like someone, along the way, has been telling porkies about Assad. :wink:


#9

The Russians are not kidding themselves, they have spoken openly about a transition from Assad. Otherwise, the country as a whole will need to be partitioned and that is also a possibility.


#10

Hezbollah lost a lot of soldiers this weekend, so as the headline says here, there is trouble even with the bombing campaign.

Vs. those who think there will be an easy victor in this war which seems to be warmongering and bloodthirsty, I’ve always felt bad that ultimately, one side is greatly outnumbered and that is the regime side.

middleeasteye.net/in-depth/features/muhammed-faris-space-odyssey-refugee-odyssey-1880597043

Muhammad Faris, Syrian National Hero,

One can tell if they are telling porkies or not about the regime there.


#11

That the regime is still using barrel bombs is amazing if the Russians are helping them. That alone speaks volumes.

We the US, got reported for killing civilians but it is nothing in comparison to what the others are doing.

Putin himself just said something about cooperation with the FSA; so it is good to be updated on the situation and not be speaking without knowledge of what is occurring.


#12

Are they serious? The Syrians have been retaking ground left right and centre ever since Putin started his Air offensive. You have Syrian planes landing at Kuweires Military Airport for the first time in 3 yrs. I think something like over 30 towns have been retaken since Russian intervention. Who knows if Russia is going to be a game hanger, but to say it has failed is just wishful thinking if not straight out deceitful


#13

Whats wrong with barrel bombs?


#14

Yes because the FSA and isis are all made up of Syrian nationals. Syria has been holding it’s own for yrs now against hordes of foreign terrorist flooding in to support the FSA and more recently isis. I don’t think the Syrian Government would require a huge amount of foreign help to keep them under control if they are defeated.


#15

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