Q. re. a point of Latin grammar

I’ve noticed that, in our hymnal’s english translation of the order of the Mass, the Holy, Holy, Holy contains the phrase “You take away the sin of the world”, while the Lamb of God says “You take away the sins of the world”.

But when I look at the text in latin I see that both places use the exact same words. Could someone tell me if the latin really indicates a difference in singular/plural usage, how it does so and what the correct translation is?

Thanks.

pecco is the verb

singular for sin is peccamen

peccata is threfore probably pleural -

However I am not a Latin scholar

All my earliest translations - 1950 say
it is Lamb of God, who takest away the sins of the world

[quote=neophyte]I’ve noticed that, in our hymnal’s english translation of the order of the Mass, the Holy, Holy, Holy contains the phrase “You take away the sin of the world”, while the Lamb of God says “You take away the sins of the world”.

But when I look at the text in latin I see that both places use the exact same words. Could someone tell me if the latin really indicates a difference in singular/plural usage, how it does so and what the correct translation is?

Thanks.
[/quote]

Usually it is clear from form of the noun whether it is singular or plural. I found this on the “Agnus Dei” thread:

Agnus Dei, qui tollis peccata mundi, Miserere nobis.

Going back 20+ years to my high school latin and applying my Italian, I am pretty sure “peccata” is singular. Anyone else want to take a shot at it?

[quote=La Chiara]Going back 20+ years to my high school latin and applying my Italian, I am pretty sure “peccata” is singular. Anyone else want to take a shot at it?
[/quote]

From the glossary in the back of A Primer of Ecclesiastical Latin, the singular is peccatum; peccata is plural.

DaveBj (Language cop)

To be more precise:
peccata is accusative plural

[quote=Iohannes]To be more precise:
peccata is accusative plural
[/quote]

Yes, in that context. In latin, the plural for accusative and nomnitive in neuter nouns is always have an a ending. peccatum, peccata is nueter. It should be sins in english.

The word sin is not necessarily singular in that sense.

In the same way that you might refer to all the crime in an area (e.g. “There’s a lot less crime in New York since the police adopted a zero tolerence policy”), this text refers to all the sin of the world.

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