Question about Catholic traditions outside the USA


#1

Hello everyone,

I navigate primarily in the Non-Catholic Religions subforum, but I had a question on Catholicism that I'm not totally sure where to post.

I was born in Italy, but I never really knew anything about Catholicism until long after we came to the United States. My parents converted to Pentecostalism long before was born, so that is the church environment I know.

The Catholic Church that they grew up in, at least from what I can tell from the rare occasions they talk about it, seems significantly different than the one I have witnessed first hand here in the United States when I have accompanied Catholic friends to Mass.

Now, I know there is a difference between an 'Extraordinary Form' and a Mass that is usually celebrated. I know that different Mass traditions can be celebrated and they're all considered perfectly valid and perfectly Catholic. So please, I ask that you do not misunderstand my questions as a swipe against one form over another.

But, my parents have never known the custom of receiving the Communion host in your hand instead of directly in your mouth (and "allowing it to dissolve rather than chew it").

To summarize, my parents remember a more classic version of Mass than I have observed. Now, my question is: is the Catholicism practiced in the United States the same as throughout the world? Are Masses celebrated differently in Europe than in America? Or is it that perhaps my parents have been away from the Catholic Church for so long that they didn't witness some changes that might have occurred over the decades?

Thank you for your time,


#2

Having been to Masses in Italy (I'm first generation Italian American ;)), I can tell you that it isn't much different. There are more people in Italy who receive on the tongue only, but I still saw a lot doing it on the hand (they could have been tourists though).

I've been to OF Masses in the US that were more reverent than ones in Italy. It really just depends on where you happen to go.

I personally always receive on the tongue and I don't chew it. Others do the opposite. Today, the Church allows people to receive in the hands and to chew the Host. While I disagree with it, I cannot overrule the Church, so it is what it is.


#3

[quote="FabiusMaximus, post:1, topic:323874"]
Hello everyone,

I navigate primarily in the Non-Catholic Religions subforum, but I had a question on Catholicism that I'm not totally sure where to post.

I was born in Italy, but I never really knew anything about Catholicism until long after we came to the United States. My parents converted to Pentecostalism long before was born, so that is the church environment I know.

The Catholic Church that they grew up in, at least from what I can tell from the rare occasions they talk about it, seems significantly different than the one I have witnessed first hand here in the United States when I have accompanied Catholic friends to Mass.

Now, I know there is a difference between an 'Extraordinary Form' and a Mass that is usually celebrated. I know that different Mass traditions can be celebrated and they're all considered perfectly valid and perfectly Catholic. So please, I ask that you do not misunderstand my questions as a swipe against one form over another.

But, my parents have never known the custom of receiving the Communion host in your hand instead of directly in your mouth (and "allowing it to dissolve rather than chew it").

To summarize, my parents remember a more classic version of Mass than I have observed. Now, my question is: is the Catholicism practiced in the United States the same as throughout the world? Are Masses celebrated differently in Europe than in America? Or is it that perhaps my parents have been away from the Catholic Church for so long that they didn't witness some changes that might have occurred over the decades?

Thank you for your time,

[/quote]

If they left before the late 60's, then chances are they didn't witness the changes in the Liturgy.

And yes. The Mass is the same all throughout the world. The main difference would just be the language.


#4

[quote="FabiusMaximus, post:1, topic:323874"]
Hello everyone,

I navigate primarily in the Non-Catholic Religions subforum, but I had a question on Catholicism that I'm not totally sure where to post.

I was born in Italy, but I never really knew anything about Catholicism until long after we came to the United States. My parents converted to Pentecostalism long before was born, so that is the church environment I know.

The Catholic Church that they grew up in, at least from what I can tell from the rare occasions they talk about it, seems significantly different than the one I have witnessed first hand here in the United States when I have accompanied Catholic friends to Mass.

Now, I know there is a difference between an 'Extraordinary Form' and a Mass that is usually celebrated. I know that different Mass traditions can be celebrated and they're all considered perfectly valid and perfectly Catholic. So please, I ask that you do not misunderstand my questions as a swipe against one form over another.

But, my parents have never known the custom of receiving the Communion host in your hand instead of directly in your mouth (and "allowing it to dissolve rather than chew it").

To summarize, my parents remember a more classic version of Mass than I have observed. Now, my question is: is the Catholicism practiced in the United States the same as throughout the world? Are Masses celebrated differently in Europe than in America? Or is it that perhaps my parents have been away from the Catholic Church for so long that they didn't witness some changes that might have occurred over the decades?

Thank you for your time,

[/quote]

I live in Dublin, Ireland and the Mass is the exact same as the States, we also have the Extraordinary Form and both Mass's are equal pending on which one you prefer. Have got Mass in Spain and its the same except for the Spanish language and not English so I understood perfectly what was going on. The Vatican allows for Holy Communion to be received in the hand or the mouth with the new Mass but of course only the mouth for the Extraordinary Form. Maybe the Lord is calling you to come back to your roots and your heritage to the One, Holy, Catholic Church and not a division of it.


#5

Having been to Masses in Italy (I'm first generation Italian American ), I can tell you that it isn't much different. There are more people in Italy who receive on the tongue only, but I still saw a lot doing it on the hand (they could have been tourists though).

I've been to OF Masses in the US that were more reverent than ones in Italy. It really just depends on where you happen to go.

I personally always receive on the tongue and I don't chew it. Others do the opposite. Today, the Church allows people to receive in the hands and to chew the Host. While I disagree with it, I cannot overrule the Church, so it is what it is.

Ah, sì? Di quale città viene la tua famiglia?

OK, well that makes sense. I've never been to a Mass in Italy so I am not really sure how reverent they are. I guess they're a lot more similar to the ones in the States than I thought. But why is there such discrepancy in terms of reverence?

If they left before the late 60's, then chances are they didn't witness the changes in the Liturgy.

And yes. The Mass is the same all throughout the world. The main difference would just be the language.

Well they left in the mid to late '70s, which I suppose would be in the "transition phase" (if there was one) of the changes.

I live in Dublin, Ireland and the Mass is the exact same as the States, we also have the Extraordinary Form and both Mass's are equal pending on which one you prefer. Have got Mass in Spain and its the same except for the Spanish language and not English so I understood perfectly what was going on. The Vatican allows for Holy Communion to be received in the hand or the mouth with the new Mass but of course only the mouth for the Extraordinary Form. Maybe the Lord is calling you to come back to your roots and your heritage to the One, Holy, Catholic Church and not a division of it.

I certainly wish it were easier to find the Extraordinary Form in my area but unfortunately it is not. I understand that both are considered entirely valid and both should be accepted according to the Catholic Church but I still have my tastes. :p


#6

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