Question About Church Structure

#21

[quote=Sir Knight]The end result is still the same – it is possible for a priest to be married.
[/quote]

Yes, but if the man is celibate when he is ordained, he must remain celibate till his death.

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#22

nice thread!:thumbsup:

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#23

[quote=Sir Knight]The Catholic Church (captial ‘C’) is composed of 6 Rites and 22 churches (little ‘c’):
[list]
*]Alexandrean Rite

  • Coptic Catholic church
  • Ethiopian (& Eritrean) Catholic church
    *]Antiochene Rite
  • Syriac Catholic church
  • Syro-Malabarese Catholic church
  • Syro-Malankarese Catholic church
    *]Armenian Rite
  • Armenian Catholic church
    *]Byzantine Rite
  • Albanian Catholic church
  • Belarusan Catholic church
  • Bulgarian Catholic church
  • Croatian Catholic church
  • Georgian Catholic church
  • Greek Catholic church
  • Hungarian Catholic church
  • Italo-Greco-Albanian Catholic church
  • Melkite Catholic church
  • Russian Catholic church
  • Romanian Catholic church
  • Ruthenian Catholic church
  • Slovakian Catholic church
  • Ukrainian Catholic church
    *]Latin Rite
  • Roman Catholic church
    *]Maronite Rite
  • Maronite Catholic church
    [/list]Of the six Rites in the Catholic Church, the Latin Rite is the only one which practices the discipline of Priestly celibacy.
    [/quote]

Thanks. I don’t know what any of this means, so I’m going to read up on it.

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#24

[quote=jimmy]All churches in the Catholic Church practice preistly celibacy. In the Byzantine tradition, no preist can marry, but a married man can become preist. In the Maronite tradition they have the same tradition as the Latin church regarding celibacy. No married man can be a Maronite preist.
[/quote]

Thanks for letting me know. I’m going to study this.

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#25

[quote=antiaphrodite]nice thread!:thumbsup:
[/quote]

Thank you, and good to see you again!

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#26

[quote=Jew_Man_73]Thank you, and good to see you again!
[/quote]

http://bestsmileys.com/blushing/7.gifditto!

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#27

Ok, this brings me to a question. Why does the Church allow all these different practices? (rites, churches, etc.) Is it due to local cultural differences or something?

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#28

[quote=antiaphrodite]http://bestsmileys.com/blushing/7.gifditto!
[/quote]

:smiley:

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#29

[quote=Jew_Man_73]Ok, this brings me to a question. Why does the Church allow all these different practices? (rites, churches, etc.) Is it due to local cultural differences or something?
[/quote]

It goes back to the same thing we were discussing on the other thread. The differences between these rites are not on issues that have been declared dogmatically as required for the belief of all Catholics. There are slight differences in the way that the liturgy is said, but for the essential elements it remains the same.

It is also through the study of these slightly varied liturgies that the dogma of the church is developed and shared throughout the church.

CARose

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#30

[quote=CARose]It goes back to the same thing we were discussing on the other thread. The differences between these rites are not on issues that have been declared dogmatically as required for the belief of all Catholics. There are slight differences in the way that the liturgy is said, but for the essential elements it remains the same.

It is also through the study of these slightly varied liturgies that the dogma of the church is developed and shared throughout the church.

CARose
[/quote]

Thanks, but I thought priestly celibacy was a dogma, that all churches had to have the same rules regarding it. No?

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#31

[quote=Jew_Man_73]Thanks, but I thought priestly celibacy was a dogma, that all churches had to have the same rules regarding it. No?
[/quote]

No. Celibacy is NOT dogma. It is a rule or discipline, and has no theological grounding. There are reasons why the Latin Rite priesthood is celibate, but none of them are required by the dogma of the Church.

In Eastern Rites, there are married priests, and there are exceptions to the rule of celibacy in the Latin Rite – Angican priests can convert to Catholicism, become priests and remain married.

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#32

[quote=vern humphrey]No. Celibacy is NOT dogma. It is a rule or discipline, and has no theological grounding. There are reasons why the Latin Rite priesthood is celibate, but none of them are required by the dogma of the Church.

In Eastern Rites, there are married priests, and there are exceptions to the rule of celibacy in the Latin Rite – Angican priests can convert to Catholicism, become priests and remain married.
[/quote]

Thank you. That clears it up for me.

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#33

[quote=Jew_Man_73]Thanks, but I thought priestly celibacy was a dogma, that all churches had to have the same rules regarding it. No?
[/quote]

Married Priests is a matter of discipline, not doctrine, let alone dogma. Priests were allowed to be married in the Latin Rite up through approximately 500 BC. I don’t know the exact circumstances of the change, but I know that it makes perfect sense if you want a missionary to have his message of Christ best accepted. He’s not living his life for Power, Money or Sex, so what is this man interested in that would allow him to give up these things? The question opens others to the truth that is Jesus. Our priests are an ongoing leaven to the world, as we have all been called to be.

At this time, the Pope could choose to allow married men to be ordained (this is different than allowing existing priests to be married, they have taken vows of celebacy and have married the Church, so they cannot now change their state in life). Do I think this is likely to happen or should happen? No.

This is different from the idea of having women priests. This has been declared dogmatically and cannot be changed.

CARose

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#34

[quote=CARose]Married Priests is a matter of discipline, not doctrine, let alone dogma. Priests were allowed to be married in the Latin Rite up through approximately 500 BC. I don’t know the exact circumstances of the change, but I know that it makes perfect sense if you want a missionary to have his message of Christ best accepted. He’s not living his life for Power, Money or Sex, so what is this man interested in that would allow him to give up these things? The question opens others to the truth that is Jesus. Our priests are an ongoing leaven to the world, as we have all been called to be.

At this time, the Pope could choose to allow married men to be ordained (this is different than allowing existing priests to be married, they have taken vows of celebacy and have married the Church, so they cannot now change their state in life). Do I think this is likely to happen or should happen? No.

This is different from the idea of having women priests. This has been declared dogmatically and cannot be changed.

CARose
[/quote]

Thanks.

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#35

Is it due to local cultural differences or something?

Pretty much it, really. The different churches also have their own hierarchies, all of which are finally subject to the Pope. The Roman Catholic Bishops have their own policies and offices, but are just as Catholic as the Armenian Catholic Bishops.

To relate it to something you might be more familiar with, it’s essentially the same difference as Sephardim and Ashkenazim: one religion, different cultural (but not doctrinal) groups.

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#36

[quote=Ghosty]Pretty much it, really. The different churches also have their own hierarchies, all of which are finally subject to the Pope. The Roman Catholic Bishops have their own policies and offices, but are just as Catholic as the Armenian Catholic Bishops.

To relate it to something you might be more familiar with, it’s essentially the same difference as Sephardim and Ashkenazim: one religion, different cultural (but not doctrinal) groups.
[/quote]

AH! Thank you! A light bulb just went on! :slight_smile:

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#37

[quote=Ghosty] … it’s essentially the same difference as Sephardim and Ashkenazim: one religion, different cultural (but not doctrinal) groups.
[/quote]

Well said Ghosty! :slight_smile:

CARose

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#38

[quote=CARose]Well said Ghosty! :slight_smile:

CARose
[/quote]

Very well said! :blessyou:

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#39

[quote=vern humphrey]No. Celibacy is NOT dogma. It is a rule or discipline, and has no theological grounding. There are reasons why the Latin Rite priesthood is celibate, but none of them are required by the dogma of the Church.

In Eastern Rites, there are married priests, and there are exceptions to the rule of celibacy in the Latin Rite – Angican priests can convert to Catholicism, become priests and remain married.
[/quote]

You are correct that priestly celibacy is not a dogma. However, you are not correct in saying that it has no theological grounding. Pope Paul VI found quite a bit of theological grounding for it in this encyclical.

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#40

[quote=atsheeran]You are correct that priestly celibacy is not a dogma. However, you are not correct in saying that it has no theological grounding. Pope Paul VI found quite a bit of theological grounding for it in this encyclical.
[/quote]

Thank you. I saved this so I can read it later when I have more time. :slight_smile:

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