Question about Mary

Just wondering, If you are protestant, and have seen the “Passion” has it changed your outlook on Mary?..if so how?

Doesn’t look like anyone wants to comment. I’m not Protestant, but Catholic, and yes it did change my view. Though I’m not sure the actual historical veracity of her being there for the majority of Christ’s final day. I did find myself drawn more to her after seeing the movie.

I’m a Protestant and saw the movie. It did not change my view of Mary, but don’t understand why you thought it would.

Doug

[quote=monembo]I’m a Protestant and saw the movie. It did not change my view of Mary, but don’t understand why you thought it would.

Doug
[/quote]

Because the movie showed a great relationship between Jesus and His Mother. A relationship that a lot of protestants don’t want to admit existed.

also i noticed that in the Passion Peter calls Mary “mother” which is a big no no to most protestants i know.

And also the way she can see “Satan” and looked at him fiercely in the eye…

I think the part that got me the most was when they were running to get close to Him, and Jesus fell and Mary broke through the crowd to kneel next to Him and He said to her “See mother, I make all things new.” WOW!!!

[quote=moira]Because the movie showed a great relationship between Jesus and His Mother. A relationship that a lot of protestants don’t want to admit existed.
[/quote]

What Protestant says that Jesus and mary didn’t have a “great relationship”, or, rather, what Protestant do you know, or have you heard, who won’t admit that they had a “great realtionship”?

[quote=tkdnick]I think the part that got me the most was when they were running to get close to Him, and Jesus fell and Mary broke through the crowd to kneel next to Him and He said to her “See mother, I make all things new.” WOW!!!
[/quote]

totaly agree! always get bogged down on that, I do! that was without a doubt my favourite scene!

[quote=Steadfast]What Protestant says that Jesus and mary didn’t have a “great relationship”, or, rather, what Protestant do you know, or have you heard, who won’t admit that they had a “great realtionship”?
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I don’t know about the Protestant view of the Jesus/Mary relationship, but all of the Protestants I know are very hostile toward the Blessed Virgin. If I ever mention her, they screw up their faces and change the subject or make some snide remark. When I was Mormon, they had a fondness for saying that “Mary was just God’s brood mare” and that when He was done with her, He just put her aside. That horrible disrespect was one of the many things that started me out of the LDS Church.
Paul

[quote=Steadfast]What Protestant says that Jesus and mary didn’t have a “great relationship”, or, rather, what Protestant do you know, or have you heard, who won’t admit that they had a “great realtionship”?
[/quote]

Mary is not given the same place in a protestant’s life as she is in a Catholic’s life. (You didn’t even capitalize her name.) Maybe I should have said that Catholics have a different relationship with Mary than protestants do. Mary is not placed above others as she should be. She is the Mother of Our Lord and she deserves a special place. I don’t hear mention of her outside of the Catholic faith.
Luke1:48 says"…from now on will all ages call me blessed" but Catholics are the only ones who call her blessed, or so it seems.

Please accept my assurance that not capitalizing her name was a typo.

I have edited the post to correct it.

Protestants are bound to believe what the Bible says about Mary, as such we have a very high opinion of her. She was blessed among women, a chosen vessel, the first Christian, etc.

If you have met Protestants who are ‘hostile’ toward her, I am very sorry for that and will not defend them. They are not the majority, but then, neither are Mormon’s Protestant, they are a cult.

Very often, I have found that Catholics, when dealing with Protestant doctrine and distinctive, will paint with a very broad brush, making us all out to be raving fundamentalists. Most Catholics do not even understand that there are a great number of different forms of Protestant, or that the vast, vast majority of conservative evangelicals have about as much to do with literalist fundamentalist polemicists as you do.

Yes, I know that’s one of your criticisms. You’re so sold on the whole visible unity thing that denominationalism looks like ecclesiological madness. I won’t try here to break you out of that particular paradigm, suffice to say that liberty has it’s consequences and that some of these consequences are the price we’ve had to pay for freedom from the yoke of Roman ‘management’. And that, very frankly, we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Well, I couldn’t edit it.

Please excuse the error of not capitalizing Mary’s name in my initial post.

Frankly though, I think it’s a little ticky-tack to even mention it…

[quote=Steadfast]…
the price we’ve had to pay for freedom from the yoke of Roman ‘management’. And that, very frankly, we wouldn’t have it any other way.
[/quote]

“To you I give the keys to the Kingdom of Heaven. … Whatever you bind on earth shall be bound in heaven, and whatever you loose on earth shall be loosed in heaven.”
[RIGHT]-- Jesus, to Peter the first pope and his fellow bishops.[/RIGHT]

:smiley:

[quote=Steadfast]If you have met Protestants who are ‘hostile’ toward her, I am very sorry for that and will not defend them. They are not the majority, but then, neither are Mormon’s Protestant, they are a cult.

Very often, I have found that Catholics, when dealing with Protestant doctrine and distinctive, will paint with a very broad brush, making us all out to be raving fundamentalists. Most Catholics do not even understand that there are a great number of different forms of Protestant, or that the vast, vast majority of conservative evangelicals have about as much to do with literalist fundamentalist polemicists as you do.
[/quote]

I did not mean to imply that Mormons are Protestant, or even Christian. I know better. But it is true that Protestants in general have a deep-seated resentment towards The Blessed Virgin (you can’t seriously pretend that they don’t), probably because they see her as distinctively Catholic. The anti-Catholic bigotry common to most Protestants transfers to anti-Marian bigotry.
Paul

I think we might be talking about 2 theological principles here. Mary the person, and Mary The Blessed Virgin or Blessed Mother. Most Protestants I have met have a high regard for Mary. However, when we (as Catholics) begin to call her The Blessed Virgin, The Blessed Mother, they tend to shy away from that, especially the “virgin” distinction. One problem we tend to make is that we lump all Protestants into one group. There differences in beliefs can be quite large from one group to another, so saying all Protestants have disdain for Mary isn’t totally correct, but I know a large number of Protestants who do not see Mary as ever virgin, nor as born without sin. That distinction is different than them not having high regard for the person of Mary as mother of Jesus.

[quote=kayla]Just wondering, If you are protestant, and have seen the “Passion” has it changed your outlook on Mary?..if so how?
[/quote]

Most certainly! I’m a new convert, currently going through RCIA, and the Passion has given me a different perspective on Mary that I didn’t have while a protestant.

[quote=Steadfast]Please excuse the error of not capitalizing Mary’s name in my initial post.

Frankly though, I think it’s a little ticky-tack to even mention it…
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It is just that it is considered an act of disrespect. I know you probably didn’t realize it, though.

God Bless.

But it is true that Protestants in general have a deep-seated resentment towards The Blessed Virgin

This is absolute nonsense, completely untrue and is slanderous (or is it libellous?).

You need to learn to distinguish between Protestant criticism of Roman Catholic doctrine about Mary and our deep respect and reverence for her person.

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