Question about mortal sin and blessing

At my school, since we have people from other denominations of christianity that go here, a person can choose to receive a blessing when they go up to eucharist instead of receiving the communion (this way it keeps the rhythm flowing through the pews). Can someone with a mortal sin receive a blessing? And can someone with a mortal sin get their throat blessed too?

[quote="cjcapta, post:1, topic:185033"]
At my school, since we have people from other denominations of christianity that go here, a person can choose to receive a blessing when they go up to eucharist instead of receiving the communion (this way it keeps the rhythm flowing through the pews). Can someone with a mortal sin receive a blessing? And can someone with a mortal sin get their throat blessed too?

[/quote]

A person is not to receive a blessing in lieu of receiving Holy Communion. The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issued five observations on November 22, 2008 that stated why these blessings are not to be done. In fact, the CDWDS cited what is current liturgical law:

  1. The liturgical blessing of the Holy Mass is properly given to each and to all at the conclusion of the Mass, just a few moments subsequent to the distribution of Holy Communion.

  2. Lay people, within the context of Holy Mass, are unable to confer blessings. These blessings, rather, are the competence of the priest (cf. Ecclesia de Mysterio, Notitiae 34 (15 Aug. 1997), art. 6, § 2; Canon 1169, § 2; and Roman Ritual De Benedictionibus (1985), n. 18).

  3. Furthermore, the laying on of a hand or hands — which has its own sacramental significance, inappropriate here — by those distributing Holy Communion, in substitution for its reception, is to be explicitly discouraged.

  4. The Apostolic Exhortation Familiaris Consortio n. 84, “forbids any pastor, for whatever reason to pretext even of a pastoral nature, to perform ceremonies of any kind for divorced people who remarry”. To be feared is that any form of blessing in substitution for communion would give the impression that the divorced and remarried have been returned, in some sense, to the status of Catholics in good standing.

  5. **In a similar way, for others who are not to be admitted to Holy Communion in accord with the norm of law, the Church’s discipline has already made clear that they should not approach Holy Communion nor receive a blessing. This would include non-Catholics **and those envisaged in can. 915 (i.e., those under the penalty of excommunication or interdict, and others who obstinately persist in manifest grave sin).

As the observations state, everyone will be receiving a blessing at the end of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. The time for Holy Communion means just that, receiving Holy Communion, not a blessing. Encouraging people to come up for a blessing just to make the pew departure flow better is not even a good reason. In fact, these individuals should stay in their own pew and pray in their own, quiet manner.

Those who are in a state of mortal sin need to find a priest as soon as possible to go to Confession. They should not be presenting themselves for a blessing in lieu of receiving Holy Communion.

Regarding mortal sin and the blessing of throats, it is not the same as going up to receive Holy Communion in mortal sin.

[quote="benedictgal, post:2, topic:185033"]
A person is not to receive a blessing in lieu of receiving Holy Communion. The Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments issued five observations on November 22, 2008 that stated why these blessings are not to be done. In fact, the CDWDS cited what is current liturgical law:

As the observations state, everyone will be receiving a blessing at the end of the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. The time for Holy Communion means just that, receiving Holy Communion, not a blessing. Encouraging people to come up for a blessing just to make the pew departure flow better is not even a good reason. In fact, these individuals should stay in their own pew and pray in their own, quiet manner.

Those who are in a state of mortal sin need to find a priest as soon as possible to go to Confession. They should not be presenting themselves for a blessing in lieu of receiving Holy Communion.

Regarding mortal sin and the blessing of throats, it is not the same as going up to receive Holy Communion in mortal sin.

[/quote]

can you give me the link for that quote...thanks!

[quote="Bookcat, post:3, topic:185033"]
can you give me the link for that quote...thanks!

[/quote]

This is from Adoremus:

adoremus.org/0209CDW_Blessing.html

Now, it does carry their interpretation of it. However, this document is legitimate as it bears a protocol number: Protocol No. 930/08/L

I have the PDF of the letter, but, I do not know how to post it online. When I spoke to the CDWDS back in December, they told me that nothing has changed and that what they wrote back in November 2008 remains in force.

The throat blessing is different than communion. You can go up to get your throat blessed.

No, a person who is conscious of mortal sin should not go up for a blessing. We should remain in our seat/ pew and contemplate why we are unable to receive communion and we resolve to get to confession as soon as possible. We may take that time to pray an act of contrition and ask Christ to impress upon our heart the spirit of conversion and the strength to turn away from sin. You adore God and praise him as well. When we are in a state of sin the only type of grace we can receive is the call to conversion and repentance.

[quote="cjcapta, post:1, topic:185033"]
At my school, since we have people from other denominations of christianity that go here, a person can choose to receive a blessing when they go up to eucharist instead of receiving the communion (this way it keeps the rhythm flowing through the pews). Can someone with a mortal sin receive a blessing? And can someone with a mortal sin get their throat blessed too?

[/quote]

A person should not APPROACH the Eucharist if they cannot receive for whatever reason. They should remain in their pew, the "rhythm flow of the pews" really does not matter.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:6, topic:185033"]
A person should not APPROACH the Eucharist if they cannot receive for whatever reason. They should remain in their pew, the "rhythm flow of the pews" really does not matter.

[/quote]

I'm not exactly sure what the reason is for making everyone go up, I just took a guess that it was the reason. Someone must inform the school of wrondoing then (The School is Our Lady of Mount Carmel High School in Baltimore County). But if they don't change their decision, and I (as a student) am forced to go up, it wouldn't be a mortal sin because I didn't have full consent, right?

[quote="cjcapta, post:7, topic:185033"]
I'm not exactly sure what the reason is for making everyone go up, I just took a guess that it was the reason. Someone must inform the school of wrondoing then (The School is Our Lady of Mount Carmel High School in Baltimore County). But if they don't change their decision, and I (as a student) am forced to go up, it wouldn't be a mortal sin because I didn't have full consent, right?

[/quote]

As a student you are required to do as you teachers and clergy say. However you should speak with your parent(s) explaining that you are being "forced" to go up even when you may not be receiving Holy Communion (for whatever reason). Ask them to speak with the teachers, staff. But no you would not be comitting a mortal sin by following their directions.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:8, topic:185033"]
As a student you are required to do as you teachers and clergy say. However you should speak with your parent(s) explaining that you are being "forced" to go up even when you may not be receiving Holy Communion (for whatever reason). Ask them to speak with the teachers, staff. But no you would not be comitting a mortal sin by following their directions.

[/quote]

But does that mean it's still a venial sin?

[quote="cjcapta, post:9, topic:185033"]
But does that mean it's still a venial sin?

[/quote]

No. The fault is with them because they are promoting something that is not a part of the Mass. No one has the right to introduce an innovation into the Holy Sacrifice of the Mass. These "blessings" do not appear in any of the authoritative documents of the Church.

It is such a Blessing to have so many wonderfully educated & caring Catholic men & women in this forum. Thank you Lord for all of them & the education & enlightenment they bring to us all.

As a student in a Catholic high school, no one has the ‘right’ to make you approach the Eucharist or receive a blessing or to ask you for a reason why you don’t! As a former Maryland Catholic high school student myself, I think you should take a stand on this issue. If you’re not receiving (there can be reasons other than mortal sin or not being Catholic) you can move to the end of the pew to keep the rhythm flowing. You can just quietly do this. If a teacher later tells you that you did something wrong, just tell him politely that, as a Catholic (or other denomination), you are doing what your conscience tells you is right. Say that you don’t intend to be disobedient or make trouble but that you are very uncomfortable doing what they are asking.

A Catholic education should give you the desire to receive the Eucharist and even to take advantage of having your throat blessed but the school can’t require you to participate. No matter what they are telling you, you are an adult in the faith and you cannot be forced. What’s worse is that they shouldn’t be blessing people at communion time but you don’t need to argue about this or act as though you are judging them.

Also, if I were the parent of a non-Catholic student I would not like my child feeling ‘forced’ to go up for a blessing. You say they can ‘choose’ to go up, but if everyone has to go up, that’s not a choice, it’s coercion.

A person in mortal sin should take that time when others are receiving the Eucharist to try to make an act of perfect contrition or at least ask Jesus to help him repent of his sin.

[quote="Br.Rich_SFO, post:8, topic:185033"]
As a student you are required to do as you teachers and clergy say. However you should speak with your parent(s) explaining that you are being "forced" to go up even when you may not be receiving Holy Communion (for whatever reason). Ask them to speak with the teachers, staff. But no you would not be comitting a mortal sin by following their directions.

[/quote]

I disagree with your first sentence. I agree he is not committing a sin for doing what the teacher and clergy say since they are pressuring him to do so. But it would not be morally wrong to refuse to follow their directions either since they don't have the right to compel those students who don't receive to take part in the communion procession.

[quote="Claire_from_DE, post:13, topic:185033"]
I disagree with your first sentence. I agree he is not committing a sin for doing what the teacher and clergy say since they are pressuring him to do so. But it would not be morally wrong to refuse to follow their directions either since they don't have the right to compel those students who don't receive to take part in the communion procession.

[/quote]

There is nothing morally wrong with going up and receiving a blessing, it is liturgically incorrect to do so, unless of course one is in Mortal sin and freely chooses to go up anyway.

I don't know if y'all realize this, but, there is now a moratorium on the first part of the OP's question. The Moderator has issued a sticky and has placed the pertinent information from the CDWDS regarding the subject.

[quote="benedictgal, post:15, topic:185033"]
I don't know if y'all realize this, but, there is now a moratorium on the first part of the OP's question. The Moderator has issued a sticky and has placed the pertinent information from the CDWDS regarding the subject.

[/quote]

I just answer the posted questions. I think the OP had more to do not with going up for a Blessing, but personal responsibility when it is not totally your own decision to do so.

[quote="cjcapta, post:7, topic:185033"]
I'm not exactly sure what the reason is for making everyone go up, I just took a guess that it was the reason. Someone must inform the school of wrondoing then (The School is Our Lady of Mount Carmel High School in Baltimore County). But if they don't change their decision, and I (as a student) am forced to go up, it wouldn't be a mortal sin because I didn't have full consent, right?

[/quote]

Some Catholic students are more enlightened than their teachers on some matters of faith and and morals and discipline. And sometimes those students are persecuted when they challenge a teacher because of something the teacher has taught. It is a brave thing to do, to raise the question with your teacher or principal or pastor about things that you have learned are incorrect. Some things are more important than others. For example, a teacher that is teaching something that is totally against Catholic teaching on faith and morals is of more grave concern. But you would not be quilty of committing even a venial sin by following the direction of your teacher or whoever in the situation that you have mentioned.

What if it’s a child that hasn’t had their first communion yet? Aren’t they allowed to go up and receive a blessing? Because that seems pretty universal to the churches I’ve been to. Plus, you can’t leave some of the real young ones by themselves or they could wander around and disturb others. In addition, one church I attend had a purse stolen, so it would be wise not to leave young children by themselves in the pews.

[quote="cjcapta, post:18, topic:185033"]
What if it's a child that hasn't had their first communion yet? Aren't they allowed to go up and receive a blessing? Because that seems pretty universal to the churches I've been to. Plus, you can't leave some of the real young ones by themselves or they could wander around and disturb others. In addition, one church I attend had a purse stolen, so it would be wise not to leave young children by themselves in the pews.

[/quote]

Please refer to the sticky that the moderator has posted. There is a moratorium on this topic.

[quote="cjcapta, post:18, topic:185033"]
What if it's a child that hasn't had their first communion yet? Aren't they allowed to go up and receive a blessing? Because that seems pretty universal to the churches I've been to. Plus, you can't leave some of the real young ones by themselves or they could wander around and disturb others. In addition, one church I attend had a purse stolen, so it would be wise not to leave young children by themselves in the pews.

[/quote]

Correct small children should not be left in the pew by themselves. They would be expected to be taken by their parent with them, but not for a Blessing.

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