Question about the assumption of Mary.

I know the belief is that Mary was assumed into heaven and didn’t experience death. But, I coulda swore I’ve heard that the belief of Mary dying because she chose to experience death was also permissable. Not because she had to like everyone else. i know that she didn’t have to because of her Immaculate conception, being free from original sin. Is this correct? Hope Im not just making this up but I though I have heard that at some point in time.

God bless,
Jesse

You’re correct!

I am not familiar with the explanation that she chose death because presumably, she wasn’t given that choice. However, the understanding that Mary may have died is entirely consonant with the Church’s teaching that when Mary had “completed the course of her earthly life” (*Munificentissimus Deus *44) she was assumed, body and soul, into Heaven.

Check out the following links.

Immaculate Conception and Assumption
*Munificentissimus Deus *

I sure hope that helps.

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_ZIvg_I3yHx0/SKM-RjRfXyI/AAAAAAAACGI/kPCn4ZaxjhU/s320/Assumption.jpg**[The Assumption (detail)]**
Daily Readings (on USCCB site):
» August 15, 2009
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Collect: All-powerful and ever-living God, you raised the sinless Virgin Mary, mother of your Son, body and soul to the glory of heaven. May we see heaven as our final goal and come to share her glory. We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son, who lives and reigns wth you and the Holy Spirit, one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

On November 1, 1950, Pius XII defined the dogma of the Assumption. Thus he solemnly proclaimed that the belief whereby the Blessed Virgin Mary, at the close of her earthly life, was taken up, body and soul, into the glory of heaven, definitively forms part of the deposit of faith, received from the Apostles. To avoid all that is uncertain the Pope did not state either the manner or the circumstances of time and place in which the Assumption took place — only the fact of the Assumption of Mary, body and soul, into the glory of heaven, is the matter of the definition.

Please see this special section on The Assumption.

Historically today is the feast of St. Tarcisius, a young martyr of the Eucharist.

The Assumption
Now toward the end of the summer season, at a time when fruits are ripe in the gardens and fields, the Church celebrates the most glorious “harvest festival” in the Communion of Saints. Mary, the supremely blessed one among women, Mary, the most precious fruit which has ripened in the fields of God’s kingdom, is today taken into the granary of heaven. — Pius Parsch

The Assumption is the oldest feast day of Our Lady, but we don’t know how it first came to be celebrated.

Its origin is lost in those days when Jerusalem was restored as a sacred city, at the time of the Roman Emperor Constantine (c. 285-337). By then it had been a pagan city for two centuries, ever since Emperor Hadrian (76-138) had leveled it around the year 135 and rebuilt it as Aelia Capitolina in honor of Jupiter.

For 200 years, every memory of Jesus was obliterated from the city, and the sites made holy by His life, death and Resurrection became pagan temples.

After the building of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre in 336, the sacred sites began to be restored and memories of the life of Our Lord began to be celebrated by the people of Jerusalem. One of the memories about his mother centered around the “Tomb of Mary,” close to Mount Zion, where the early Christian community had lived.

On the hill itself was the “Place of Dormition,” the spot of Mary’s “falling asleep,” where she had died. The “Tomb of Mary” was where she was buried.

At this time, the “Memory of Mary” was being celebrated. Later it was to become our feast of the Assumption.

For a time, the “Memory of Mary” was marked only in Palestine, but then it was extended by the emperor to all the churches of the East. In the seventh century, it began to be celebrated in Rome under the title of the “Falling Asleep” (“Dormitio”) of the Mother of God.

Soon the name was changed to the “Assumption of Mary,” since there was more to the feast than her dying. It also proclaimed that she had been taken up, body and soul, into heaven.

That belief was ancient, dating back to the apostles themselves. What was clear from the beginning was that there were no relics of Mary to be venerated, and that an empty tomb stood on the edge of Jerusalem near the site of her death. That location also soon became a place of pilgrimage. (Today, the Benedictine Abbey of the Dormition of Mary stands on the spot.)

At the Council of Chalcedon in 451, when bishops from throughout the Mediterranean world gathered in Constantinople, Emperor Marcian asked the Patriarch of Jerusalem to bring the relics of Mary to Constantinople to be enshrined in the capitol. The patriarch explained to the emperor that there were no relics of Mary in Jerusalem, that “Mary had died in the presence of the apostles; but her tomb, when opened later . . . was found empty and so the apostles concluded that the body was taken up into heaven.”

In the eighth century, St. John Damascene was known for giving sermons at the holy places in Jerusalem. At the Tomb of Mary, he expressed the belief of the Church on the meaning of the feast: “Although the body was duly buried, it did not remain in the state of death, neither was it dissolved by decay. . . . You were transferred to your heavenly home, O Lady, Queen and Mother of God in truth.”

All the feast days of Mary mark the great mysteries of her life and her part in the work of redemption. The central mystery of her life and person is her divine motherhood, celebrated both at Christmas and a week later (Jan. 1) on the feast of the Solemnity of Mary, Mother of God. The Immaculate Conception (Dec. 8) marks the preparation for that motherhood, so that she had the fullness of grace from the first moment of her existence, completely untouched by sin. Her whole being throbbed with divine life from the very beginning, readying her for the exalted role of mother of the Savior.

The Assumption completes God’s work in her since it was not fitting that the flesh that had given life to God himself should ever undergo corruption. The Assumption is God’s crowning of His work as Mary ends her earthly life and enters eternity. The feast turns our eyes in that direction, where we will follow when our earthly life is over.

The feast days of the Church are not just the commemoration of historical events; they do not look only to the past. They look to the present and to the future and give us an insight into our own relationship with God. The Assumption looks to eternity and gives us hope that we, too, will follow Our Lady when our life is ended.

In 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus, Pope Pius XII proclaimed the Assumption of Mary a dogma of the Catholic Church in these words: “The Immaculate Mother of God, the ever-virgin Mary, having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heaven.”

With that, an ancient belief became Catholic doctrine and the Assumption was declared a truth revealed by God.

Fr. Clifford Stevens in Catholic Heritage

gloria.tv/?media=11465

3.bp.blogspot.com/_ZIvg_I3yHx0/SKM-RjRfXyI/AAAAAAAACGI/kPCn4ZaxjhU/s320/Assumption.jpg

Whether or not Mary died is not defined doctrine. It is a widely held opinion that she did die in order more closely to imitate her Son.

I believe she already “died” when her son was on the cross. It was enough. I think she just sort of fell asleep, I believe in the dormission of Mary.

I know the belief is that Mary was assumed into heaven and didn’t experience death.


**No, you don’t know that because it is NOT the belief that the Theotokos did not die, because she did experience death. Her soul was separated from her body, howsoever briefly (traditionally three days).

All of the Eastern Churches, including those in union with Rome, teach that she did suffer physical death. In fact, the Byzantine name for 15 August is the Dormition (Falling Asleep–that is death) of the Theotokos.

Furthermore, in the Roman office for the feast promulgated in 1950 when Pius XII dogmatized the Assumption, the fifth Matins lesson, quoting St. John of Damascus, says “But she yielded obedience to the law established by him to whom she had given birth, and, as the daughter of the old Adam, underwent the old sentence, which even her Son, who is the very Life Itself, had not refused”–that is, physical death. Lex orandi, lex credendi. If it’s in the liturgical formularies of the Church, it’s the teaching of the church.**

The official definition of the dogma simply states, “at the end of her earthly life” which leads some to believe that Mary did not die as a logical consequence of her Immaculate Conception. Which, that is true-- Mary did not have to die–however, as far as I can tell, the oldest traditions and liturgical celebrations of the Church hold that Mary did die as a model of perfect discipleship and Christian imitation.

I can’t even think of a Saint with Marian writings who claimed Mary did not experience death.

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