Question About the Rosary


#1

Why do you have to say the “hail holy queen”? That seemed borderline Mary worship to me, just the wording of it. Can someone please explain that to me. I thought Catholics don’t believe in Mary worship so why say those things?

I understand you want to honor her as she is Christ’s mother but isn’t that going a bit far to say “our life, our sweetness…” etc? I thought only God was to be those things. I’m not trying to offend anyone but how would you interpret this?


#2

I would only say that, starting from the correct attitude regarding Mary, our Mother in Christ, these words take on the sentiments that a child, in his best of moments, might feel towards the best of mothers.

I think there are two ways of looking at it, from a Catholic perspective. 1) Poetically: I call my wife “my life” on many occasions, and could conceivably call her “my sweetness”. By these, I do not mean to imply that she conceived me or saved me, but that her loving role is so huge in my life that sometimes it seems as if my life would be done without her. Note that this never ever even comes close to implying that I worship my wife. If it is possible to say that of my wife, then more so of Mary. Her prayers and love for us are so huge that it is possible to say the same thing of her.

  1. Theologically: her role, however “small”, in bringing the fullness of divine life to us poor sinners (i.e., in the incarnation), warrants these terms.

I tend to prefer explanation #1. But it must be noted, when one realizes the heights to which God has raised “mere” creatures (by grace), it only serves to render the heights of his divine glory that much more incomprehensible.


#3

[quote=Christian4life]Why do you have to say the “hail holy queen”? That seemed borderline Mary worship to me, just the wording of it. Can someone please explain that to me. I thought Catholics don’t believe in Mary worship so why say those things?

I understand you want to honor her as she is Christ’s mother but isn’t that going a bit far to say “our life, our sweetness…” etc? I thought only God was to be those things. I’m not trying to offend anyone but how would you interpret this?
[/quote]

Actually, not everyone says the Hail Holy Queen at the end of the Rosary. Some say the Memorare or some other prayer. Depends on where you are from, and how you learned to say the Rosary.


#4

If I became a Catholic, would I be able to voice the opinion that I think there is too much devotional focus on Mary?

I have come a long way from my reactionary bible church beliefs on Mary (i.e., ignoring everything about her). I believe we should call her blessed, give her honor and veneration–but the popularity of the Rosary mixed with it’s focus on Mary still bothers me.


#5

[quote=RonRule]If I became a Catholic, would I be able to voice the opinion that I think there is too much devotional focus on Mary?

I have come a long way from my reactionary bible church beliefs on Mary (i.e., ignoring everything about her). I believe we should call her blessed, give her honor and veneration–but the popularity of the Rosary mixed with it’s focus on Mary still bothers me.
[/quote]

Hey RonRule,

In my opinion, all the marian devotion is largely optional.

I am glad you have come to accept what you have regarding Mary, But of course as a catholic, you would have to accept fully the teachings of the Church regarding Mary.

You should check out the Catholic Church Catechism for that.

I found that the pope JP II apostolic letter, Rosarium Virginis Mariae, to be of enormous value in fostering a desire to pray the Rosary.

There is another document, I dont have to hand by a saint Louis, that was instrumental in the development of the popes own understanding of the place of mary in his own personal relationship with Jesus.

Google for St Louis, JPII and Mary, you may get it. If not Let me know by personal message.

M.


#6

RonRule

another document might interest you.

“The Holy Spirit and Mary.”

Letter of pope paul VI to Cardinal Leon Josef Suenens on the occasion of the international marian congress May 13, 1975.

hope it helps in some way.


#7

[quote=RonRule]If I became a Catholic, would I be able to voice the opinion that I think there is too much devotional focus on Mary?

I have come a long way from my reactionary bible church beliefs on Mary (i.e., ignoring everything about her). I believe we should call her blessed, give her honor and veneration–but the popularity of the Rosary mixed with it’s focus on Mary still bothers me.
[/quote]

While you could voice your opinion, might I suggest that when you become Catholic, you just spend a relatively quiet time (a year or so) just being Catholic, learning, and asking questions?

The Church teaches that it is a spiritual act of mercy to admonish the sinner, but you should always do so in humility, and make sure that what you are admonishing is truly a sin.

Remember that it is difficult to impossible to read someone’s heart, and so you should always assume the best. As Philippians 2:3 says, “…in humility consider others as better than yourselves.”


#8

Thanks! You know it’s the strangest thing, this topic just crossed my mind this afternoon, and 2 things suddenly occured to me.
First of all, if someone asked me had I said those things to my husband, I couldn’t swear that I hadn’t. Would that mean I was committing idolatry over him - maybe! But I’d hope not.

The other thing, it’s not compulsory to say it, so for now I just won’t.


#9

I believe the St. Louis mentioned is St. Louis de Montefort.


#10

I posted this before, but I feel it adequately addresses the intention of the original post, even if it doesn’t address directly the “Hail, Holy Queen”:

As Catholics, sometimes we forget the wealth of information we have from the writings from 2000 years of theologians and Church Leaders. I came across this by Bishop Fulton Sheen. As many of you know, he was famous in the 1950’s for his public TV broadcasts. He is often credited for showing the “softer side” of Catholocism; one the average Christian could identify with, rather than the cold, hard institution you often see from the News Media.

Anyway, I want to show you what Bishop Sheen wrote about Mary. Any Non-Catholics or any Catholics who have trouble praying with Mary, may find this interesting:

*As Eden was the Paradise of Creation, Mary is the Paradise of the Incarnation, and in her as a Garden was celebrated the first nuptials of God and man. The closer one gets to fire, the greater the heat; the closer one is to God, the greater the purity. But since no one was ever closer to God than the woman whose human portals He threw open to walk this earth, then no one could have been more pure than she….

The key to understanding Mary is this: We do not start with Mary. We start with Christ, the Son of the living God! The less we think of Him, the less we think of her, the more we think of Him, the more we think of her; the more we adore His Divinity, the more we venerate her Motherhood; the less we adore His Divinity, the less reason we have for respecting her….

No one who thinks logically about Christ can understand such a question as: “Why do you speak so often of His Mother?”…. It may be objected: “Our Lord is enough for me. I have no need of her.” But He needed her, whether we do or not. And what is more important, Our Blessed Lord gave us His Mother as our Mother….

Mary is a window through which our humanity first catches a glimpse of Divinity on earth. Or perhaps she is more like a magnifying glass that intensifies our love of her Son, and makes our prayers more bright and burning.

God, Who made the sun, also made the moon. The moon does not take away from the brilliance of the sun. The moon would only be a burnt-out cinder floating in the immensity of space, were it not for the sun. All its light is reflected from the sun. The Blessed Mother reflects her Divine Son; without Him she is nothing. With Him, she is the Mother of Men. *

From Sheen’s, The World’s First Love

NotWorthy


#11

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