Question for our non-Catholic Friends please

Dear friend in Christ,

We appreciate your participation here on CAF:)

Would you share with is WHAT DOES YOUR CHURCH TEACH ABOUT SIN?

Thank you,
Patrick

My church has no stance on sin because I’m not a member of any church or organization.

Thanks for asking this. Sin separates us from God. As a Lutheran, I believe that we are born sinful because of Original sin going back to our first parents, Adam and Eve. I believe that we receive forgiveness of sins through Baptism, Confession and Absolution, and the Eucharist because of Christ’s atoning death on the cross. Because He is our Redeemer, He can and does offer us forgiveness of sins through the sacraments He instituted, thus enabling us to share in eternal life with Him.

=NoWings;11644291]My church has no stance on sin because I’m not a member of any church or organization.

OK;)

So what DO YOU think about sin?

=Stilldreamn;11644311]Thanks for asking this. Sin separates us from God. As a Lutheran, I believe that we are born sinful because of Original sin going back to our first parents, Adam and Eve. I believe that we receive forgiveness of sins through Baptism, Confession and Absolution, and the Eucharist because of Christ’s atoning death on the cross. Because He is our Redeemer, He can and does offer us forgiveness of sins through the sacraments He instituted, thus enabling us to share in eternal life with Him.

GREAT reply, thank you:thumbsup:

But are Lutheran sacraments valid and licit?

God Bless you,
Patrick

I don’t think anything about it because I don’t believe in it. It’s a concept that doesn’t affect me one way or the other, other than maybe cheeky colloquial terms. If my wife burns the rolls in the oven, I might tell her that she’s committed great sin against the gods.

Depends on who you ask. Ask a Lutheran and you will here certainty that our sacraments are both licit and valid. Ask a Catholic and you will hear that. while our Baptism and marriage are valid, our other sacraments are not.
Ask a typical Anglican, and they will say our sacraments are valid. Ask a Baptist and they will probably say we are all wrong for holding to sacraments.

Jon

Ah, Patrick. We can agree a Lutheran baptism is valid and licit, I am sure. From the RCC point of view, I suppose the best I can hope for after my effective baptism are acts of perfect contrition and the great mercy of Christ.

To sin is to “miss the mark.” The Law is in place to show us our side of the covenant, and then to show us that we will always, on our own, miss the mark. Sin was nailed to the cross, and Jesus became sin for us, paying for all sin, past, present and future, and taking the punishment for it. The Law was also nailed to the cross, and we are no longer under it or under condemnation if we are in Christ, and that happens by faith.

That all have sinned and fallen short of the glory of God. That sin separates us from God, but through Christ’s shed blood on the Cross we can be cleansed and forgiven of all our sins. If we confess our sins, he is faithful and just to forgive us and to cleanse us of all unrighteousness.

This is a good question. It will be interesting to hear the answers.

Glenda

Typical Anglican? A mythical beast.

GKC

I’m an ex-Lutheran (LCMS) we did not have confession/absolution and was not taught that the Lutheran communion forgives sin. What synod are you a member of?

Annie

I am a member of a confessional LCMS Lutheran church. We are encouraged (but not required) to make use of private confession and absolution, and it is always done before confirmation.

From Luther’s Small Catechism:

What is Confession?
Confession embraces two parts: the one is, that we confess our sins; the other, that we receive absolution, or forgiveness, from the confessor, as from God Himself, and in no wise doubt, but firmly believe, that our sins are thereby forgiven before God in heaven.

On Holy Communion:
What is the benefit of such eating and drinking?
That is shown us in these words: Given, and shed for you, for the remission of sins; namely, **that in the Sacrament forgiveness of sins, life, and salvation are given us **through these words. For where there is forgiveness of sins, there is also life and salvation.

Are you in communion with the LCMS that does not have confession?

I am so sorry, Annie, that you were so poorly catechized in whatever parish you were in. Luther’s Small catechism is typically the model for catechetical instruction in the Lutheran Church, regardless of synod.

#Every Divine Worship has a corporate Order of confession and Holy Absolution.

Absolution includes the words from the pastor: ** “As a called an ordained servant of Christ, and by His authority, I therefore forgive you all of your sin, in the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit. Amen.”**

#The Lutheran Service Book provides an order for Private Confession, again based on Luther’s Small Catechism

Honestly, I can’t imagine a Lutheran pastor being allowed to so dramatically mislead his parish as your LCMS pastor apparently did. The district president should have been called in!

Jon

EDIT: JonNC’s did a better job in the post above.

One of the first things in the Lutheran (LCMS) Divine Service is confession and absolution, and your pastor was available for private confession as well.

I am a member of an LCMS congregation (individuals belong to a congregation - the congregation as a whole, and the pastor are members of synod). What I was trying to say was that the LCMS does indeed have individual confession and absolution (rubrics are described in the hymnal) but I concede that few individuals avail themselves of it except when required to such as before confirmation.

“Confessional” Lutherans are found in various synods and are conservative, using litugical settings for the Divine Service, etc.

The LCMS congregation I belong to was started in 1855, and probably would be recognizable in practice to the early families (although not the language!)

I agree - and I apologize if it seems like we were piling on! I got busy for a few minutes, and when I completed my post I was 10 minuts late :blush:

I’ll avoid quibbling over the definition of ‘Catholic’ :wink:

Sin is explained by the Greek word ‘hamartia’ which is the word used when an archer misses the target. Missing the mark is pretty close. That means a sin is anything you do, knowingly or unknowingly, that results in you not doing what Christ would have you do in that moment. It is not a transgression of a law in and of itself, it does not accompany a mandatory ‘payment’ or ‘retribution’ which must be paid. It is not a separation from God (how can we be separated from He Who is Everywhere?) and it does not prevent God from having a relationship with us. It’s simply turning away from the path which leads to God, and how far that turn is or whether you know you’re doing it is irrelevant.

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