Question on converting to Catholicism


#1

I am presently an Anglican who after read a number of books including the Catechism of the Catholic Church. My wife supports may journey but is not inclined to convert (at this time). I would like to attend Mass on Saturday evening and several during the week but my wife would like to attend the Anglican church with her on Sunday.
Is this possible?


#2

I’m assuming that you mean after you convert … but as long as you go to Mass on Sunday/Saturday vigil, you’re fine.
You also probably (check with the staff apologists on this) shouldn’t receive communion in the Anglican Church, as receiving communion implies a community and a oneness of believers that we have not reached with our fractured churches :-(. Because of that, Catholics are not supposed to receive communion in non-Catholic churches.
Welcome to the faith! Keep praying and your wife is sure to follow. You might want to ask St. Monica’s help; she prayed for her son for years and years, and he eventually converted.


#3

You may attend Mass now,no matter which day, but not partake of the Eucharist until after your reception into the Church. I know this is hard because I went through it myself when it took a couple years for me to be baptised and confirmed.

You may continue to attend the Anglican services with your wife but, since you are no longer in communion with the Anglican faith (you want to become Catholic), I also would recommend that you not receive communion in the Anglican service either.

After you are received into the Church, you definitely may not partake of the Anglican communion although you may attend services with your wife, so long as you meet your Sunday Mass obligation, as I understand it.

Good journey and welcome home.


#4

Welcome! :smiley:

Yes, there’s a thread you can join in on if you’d like – it’s in the Family Life section and is called “St. Monica pray for us! Praying for our husbands…” – though there are husbands praying for wives there too. :thumbsup:

By the way, St. Monica’s son was St. Augustine. :wink: :slight_smile:


#5

yes, but you would still have to go to the catholic mass (sat night or sunday) to fulfil your obligation.


#6

I think you might’ve read it wrong; he isn’t a Catholic yet. He has no obligation to attend Catholic mass.


#7

Re: those who advise the OP not to continue receiving Communion in the Anglican church, I’d like to point out that Caryll Houselander advised a friend who was in the process of converting to continue receiving Communion in her Anglican church until she was formally received into the Catholic Church. She told her friend that even though the Catholic Church didn’t see the Anglican eucharist as valid, she could receive it as a “spiritual communion”.

And I would also suggest to the OP that you not let strangers on the Internet convince you on this matter one way or the other, but seek the counsel of a Catholic priest. :slight_smile:


#8

yes, but if he is seriously planning to become catholic, it is good to start attending- although you are right that there is no obligation yet


#9

Thanks for your answers. I have been going to our local Catholic church on Saturday and during the week without taking part in Communion. I have made arrangements to meet with the local priest this week. Your answers are deeply appreciated.


#10

I couldn’t agree more!

Definitely talk to the priest and follow his direction.

FYI, an Anglican can receive communion in the Roman Catholic Church, if they’ve been given permission by the Bishop, which usually comes through the pastor.

Jim


#11

Sure, it’s possible. Ecumenism is a good thing when everyone remains civil and genuinely tolerant. Nonetheless, disparity of cult can weaken one’s devotion to his particular church. It’s tricky.


#12

I know that in the Episcopal Church, they allow all trinitarian Christians to take Eucharist, regardless of denomination. I imagine that it would be similar in Canada and Europe.


closed #13

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