Question regarding anointing of the sick.


#1

My ma is in the hospital, the doctor said she's got roughly a fifty fifty shot of living. I'm a recent convert and was wondering if non Catholics can receive the anointing of the sick. I went to my parish earlier to have a priest visit but our English speaking priest is off today so another priest whom doesn't know much English came and said a blessing but didn't do the anointing. My mom was baptized baptist, and spent some time in a foster home as a teen where she revived communion with the other foster kids as the foster family was catholic. While my momma has never explicitly said she believed the Catholic Church is the one true church she did say she felt it seemed more holly than Protestant churches. She's a simple woman and doesn't know a lot about theology but I'm sure she would be more than happy to receive any sacraments that my help reconsider her to god where she concise. She was ODing on drugs before these other underlining health problems hit her and I wasn't very happy with her when I called the paramedics I'm extremely worried her last thoughts are of me berating her for taking to many drugs again. I just want her to get any sacraments that will help her get into heaven. Is there any chance that if I explained the situation to a priest more fluent in English he'd be willing to perform the anointing?


#2

Not to sound raciest I just don't think the priest quiet understood that she was baptized just not catholic. She was baptized in the proper Trinitarian way just not by a priest.


#3

I know it's late but the doctors said thell now by tomarrow afternoon weather thell be able to fix her or not and would like an awnser befor then if at all possible.


#4

[quote="nothingclever, post:1, topic:305652"]
My ma is in the hospital, the doctor said she's got roughly a fifty fifty shot of living. I'm a recent convert and was wondering if non Catholics can receive the anointing of the sick. I went to my parish earlier to have a priest visit but our English speaking priest is off today so another priest whom doesn't know much English came and said a blessing but didn't do the anointing. My mom was baptized baptist, and spent some time in a foster home as a teen where she revived communion with the other foster kids as the foster family was catholic. While my momma has never explicitly said she believed the Catholic Church is the one true church she did say she felt it seemed more holly than Protestant churches. She's a simple woman and doesn't know a lot about theology but I'm sure she would be more than happy to receive any sacraments that my help reconsider her to god where she concise. She was ODing on drugs before these other underlining health problems hit her and I wasn't very happy with her when I called the paramedics I'm extremely worried her last thoughts are of me berating her for taking to many drugs again. I just want her to get any sacraments that will help her get into heaven. Is there any chance that if I explained the situation to a priest more fluent in English he'd be willing to perform the anointing?

[/quote]

According to Canon Law the Anointing of the Sick is for the faithful (meaning Catholics).
However, it might make sense to speak to an English speaking priest.

Can. 998 The anointing of the sick, by which the Church commends to the suffering and glorified Lord the faithful who are dangerously ill so that he may support and save them, is conferred by anointing them with oil and pronouncing the words prescribed in the liturgical books.


#5

Have a non Catholic minister, maybe the chaplain in the hospital, anoint her. It will not be the Catholic sacrament but God will still hear the prayer and provide a blessing.


#6

Ok thanks guys I was pretty sure it wasn't allowed but I had to see. It's a catholic hospital but ill see what I can do. Prayers would be welcome.


#7

Here is your answer.

As you can see, several conditions must be present. There must be a danger of death, or other "grave and pressing need". This is true for your mother. There is a real danger of immediate death. Also, the recipient must "demonstrate the catholic faith in respect of these sacraments and are properly disposed". That means that your mother must clearly make a profession of faith that satisfies the priest that her beliefs are one with the Catholic Church. She must also be in a state of grace, which usually means she should receive the Sacrament of Penance prior to this one. If your mother cannot speak for herself, then you have a problem. She cannot freely ask for the sacrament or demonstrate her faith.

I would suggest in this case that she approach a minister of her own faith and ask him for the appropriate prayers and blessings.


#8

If you are in the United States, all hospital patients have a right to spiritual care. The hospital's chaplaincy department coordinates the appropriate pastoral actions for each patient who requests care. Someone from the department usually makes rounds on patients admitted within the past several hours. The patient can then indicate to the department representative, who may be of any religion, what their spiritual preferences are, and a representative of that faith will be notified to see the patient.

Anointing of the Sick is one of the seven sacraments, and is usually reserved for Catholics who are seriously ill, and "in danger of death" has generally been interpreted liberally, at least around here. The preference of the Church nowadays is that the scenario of a priest rushing to the bedside of an actively dying Catholic in the middle of the night should be the exception rather than the rule, as it used to be around fifty years ago. In part, that is why they stopped calling it "Extreme Unction" or "Last Rites." That is also why you see so many parish-based "Anointing of the Sick" celebrations. It's exactly the same sacrament, and should be proceeded by sacramental confession, which, of course, is not available to non-Catholics, and accompanied by the Eucharist, which is generally not available to non-Catholics, either.

Still, most priests, particularly those in hospital chaplaincy, are very concerned about the spiritual welfare of the sick. If your mother is not Catholic, even though she would not be eligible for an actual sacramental anointing, she can still profit spiritually and be comforted by a chaplain's visits and prayers.

Notify the charge nurse on the floor where your mother is hospitalized that she would like to see a chaplain for prayers and support. The nurses are usually wonderful about getting this to happen.


#9

ask your mother what she wants to do


#10

My mother hasn't been awake since she got here. We're doing dialises temporaryalie but that's likely the last step were willing to convent to. I had the Protestant chaplain say a prayer with us over her. She doesn't have any reflexises or sighns of getting better. Well likely stop the machines after everybody had a chance to come by and say good buy. Thanks for the advice.


#11

For the soul of you Mother, we pray...

Eternal Father, We offer You the The Most Precious Blood of Thy Divine Son, Jesus, in union with the Masses said throughout the world today. For all the Holy Souls in Purgatory, for sinners everywhere, for sinners in the Universal Church, those in my own home, and within my family. Amen! May God Bless you with peace


closed #12

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.