Question Regarding Precious Blood


#1

Hey and merry Christmas everyone!

I was always taught when receiving the Blood of Christ to take a miniscule amount so as to leave enough for everyone. Sometimes I am too cautious about it and end up giving the minister the chalice back before the Blood even touches my lips. This isn’t a sin, right?


#2

No, it is not a sin.

And the goal shouldn’t be “a miniscule amount” unless you were very sure there wasn’t enough left for everyone, such as the case when there is little left in the cup and there is still a long line behind you.

Outside of that situation, your goal should be “a sip”. Less than a mouthful, more than a drop. While Christ is present in that miniscule amount, the form of receiving the sacrament should be that of drinking a liquid, not just tasting something. After all the command is “Take this and drink…”

It’s up to the pastoral ministers of the parish to make sure they don’t keep running out of the Precious Blood if everyone who normally receives from the cup takes a normal sip. Just like it’s their responsibility to make sure the Consecrated Bread doesn’t run out. Otherwise, what you’re doing would be like receiving a Host, breaking off a teeny bit, and putting the rest back because you’re worried about running out. Trust your parish ministers to worry about that and take a full Host and an actual drink to experience the fullness of the sacramental sign.

Edit: And Merry Christmas to you, too!


#3

When Communion under both kinds was introduced in our Archdiocese, sacristans were advised to put out a 5 mil. teaspoon of wine per person in the chalice or jug. So you are safe to take at least a teaspoonful. and probably more, as not everyone receives from the chalice.


#4

That’s very nice of you, but don’t worry about that, just take a small sip. You don’t want to approach the Chalice for no reason.

From the General Instruction of the Roman Missal:

d. The communicant then moves to the minister of the chalice and stands before him. The minister says: “The blood of Christ,” the communicant answers: “Amen,” and the minister holds out the chalice with purificator. For the sake of convenience, communicants may raise the chalice to their mouth themselves. Holding the purificator under the mouth with one hand, they drink a little from the chalice, taking care not to spill it, and then return to their place. The minister wipes the outside of the chalice with the purificator.

There is no indication whatsoever on worrying about whether enough is left for the other faithful. This is, on the other hand, a concern for the priest:

The celebrant receives the Lord’s body and blood as usual, making sure enough remains in the chalice for the other communicants.

P.s.: did you notice the disposition regarding the purificator? This picture shows how we are supposed to hold that small piece of linen when we receive the Precious Blood from the chalice.


#5

=faithhopelove12;10170412]Hey and merry Christmas everyone!

I was always taught when receiving the Blood of Christ to take a miniscule amount so as to leave enough for everyone. Sometimes I am too cautious about it and end up giving the minister the chalice back before the Blood even touches my lips. This isn’t a sin, right?

That is NOT a sin: RIGHT!

Are you aware that you DO reveive the ENTIRE Christ: Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity in either the Host alone [normal form] and also the challice alone?
God Bless,

pat/PJM


#6

From what I’ve seen at our parish, the EMHCs end up having to consume the Precious Blood remaining in the chalices because many people do not receive it or take only a miniscule amount. For what it’s worth, if they do ‘run out’ before everyone is able to receive the Precious Blood, the Host still contains the full Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ (so it’s not like they would ‘miss out’ on Jesus).


#7

The host does not “contain” it but simply is the Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity of Christ.


#8

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