Question regarding the Eucharist


#1

Once the priest has said the words of consecration over the host and it becomes the body, or flesh, of Our Blessed Lord, how is it also his blood, soul and divinity?
Why does the church teach that even when we receive only the Sacred Host, we also receive the Precious Blood?

Thank you and God bless.


#2

When we receive the Eucharist, we receive Christ Himself. Although He is fully human and fully divine, these two cannot be separated (by virtue of something called the "hypostatic union"). He has two "natures" but is only one "Person", a divine person. Therefore, we receive the entire Christ. Each particle of the Host contains Him entirely - Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity.

This is the way I understand it. Someone with a background in sacramental theology will be better able to explain this, and will hopefully correct my explanation if needed.


#3

[quote="FAH, post:1, topic:317854"]
Once the priest has said the words of consecration over the host and it becomes the body, or flesh, of Our Blessed Lord, how is it also his blood, soul and divinity? Why does the church teach that even when we receive only the Sacred Host, we also receive the Precious Blood?

Thank you and God bless.

[/quote]

Christ is not partially present in the Eucharist. Transubstantiation means the substance of both bread and wine becomes the substance of Christ. Only flesh, or only soul, or only blood, would not be Christ.


#4

"Body" in Greek, or soma, is not just what we think of as body (the solid anatomy within the skin). Soma meant the whole human being. We still have the shadow of that usage: when we say "somebody" or "everybody," we mean persons with life and mind, not just "bodies."

Likewise, our LORD is not received as "body" alone, as though HE were still dead (only in death is the body left alone); we receive all of HIM.

ICXC NIKA


#5

Someone can correct me if I understand wrongly -
The Mass is the eternal sacrifice where Christ's death and resurrection are re-presented for us. The bread and wine are consecrated seperately (the first as the body, the second as the blood). The seperation of flesh and blood means death. When these elements are rejoined by the priest (a small piece of the Host in the form of bread is dropped into the chalice), this is resurrection to life. The flesh and blood are no longer seperate, and when you receive Holy Communion, you are receiving, not a dead Jesus whose flesh is seperated from the lifeblood, but the resurrected Lord - body, blood, soul and divinity.


#6

[quote="SecretaryMonday, post:5, topic:317854"]
Someone can correct me if I understand wrongly -
The Mass is the eternal sacrifice where Christ's death and resurrection are re-presented for us. The bread and wine are consecrated seperately (the first as the body, the second as the blood). The seperation of flesh and blood means death. When these elements are rejoined by the priest (a small piece of the Host in the form of bread is dropped into the chalice), this is resurrection to life. The flesh and blood are no longer seperate, and when you receive Holy Communion, you are receiving, not a dead Jesus whose flesh is seperated from the lifeblood, but the resurrected Lord - body, blood, soul and divinity.

[/quote]

:thumbsup:


#7

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