Questions About Catholicism


#1

I can’t figure out where in this forum to ask what. I’d like to know more about the 7 deadly sins and the heavenly virtues, just something that intrigues me. Also, what is an apologist/apologetics?

Sorry if this is in the wrong section. This forum can be confusing to someone that isn’t too familiar with catholicism.


#2

The seven deadly sins are Pride, Covetousness, Gluttony, Lust, Anger, Greed and Sloth. We read about these in the Sermon on the Mount, which we find in Matthew chapters five through seven.

There are three Theological Virtues, which are Faith, Hope, and Charity, and four Cardinal Virtues are Prudence, Justice, Fortitude and Temperance, making a total of seven Virtues.

Also, what is an apologist/apologetics?

The term “Apologetics” comes from the titles of two essays that were written by St. Justin Martyr for the Emperor of Rome, which together formed a very detailed explanation of the Catholic faith. These two essays were known as the First and Second Apologias of St. Justin.

“Apologetics” is simply the art of explaining the Catholic faith to people who aren’t Catholic. An “apologist” is a person who explains the faith to non-Catholics.


#3

Hi Tawheedah- next time if you’re unsure post it in ‘‘Back Fence’’ like I usually do :slight_smile: . The seven deadly sins are Lust, Gluttony, Greed, Sloth, Wrath, Envy and Pride. They are also known as the Cardinal sins.

The Church also recognises seven Cardinal virtues, the opposites to the deadly sins, they are, in the same order as their opposite sin: Chastity, Temperence, Charity, Diligence, Forgiveness, Kindness (admiration) and Humility.

An Apologist is someone who defends a viewpoint. In this context it would be someone who defends Catholic teaching (in debate) or confirms or corrects someones ideas about Catholicism.


#4

Seven Deadly Sins:

  1. Pride
  2. Envy
  3. Lust
  4. Anger
  5. Gluttony
  6. Greed
  7. Sloth

Seven Virtues that defeat the Seven Deadly Sins:

  1. Humility
  2. Kindness (meekness)
  3. Chastity
  4. Patience
  5. Periodic fasting and abstinence
  6. Generosity
  7. Diligence

Source: Table 11-1 from the Book Catholicism for Dummies page 207-208


#5

Thanks for the answers.:slight_smile: So an apologist would be similar to a scholar or a shiekh in Islam?

And are the seven deadly sins/heavenly virtues only a Catholic thing? Another question, what exactly does the concept “original sin” involve?


#6

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:

ORIGINAL SIN

The Catholic Encyclopedia is a good source of information as well.

Peace be with you,

Kelly


#7

Not so much. By virtue of representing and explaining your faith and engaging in debate here, you’re one too :wink:

And are the seven deadly sins/heavenly virtues only a Catholic thing? Another question, what exactly does the concept “original sin” involve?

The seven deadlies get a lot of press in various branches of Protestantism too. The concept’s not unique to Catholicism, though it did originate with it.

Original sin is the idea that Adam’s sin in eating from the Tree of Knowledge was so great that it carried down through his descendants. Everyone then is stained by that sin (after all, we live in a world created by its results), and baptism is the mechanism by which that taint is removed.


#8

I’m not sure about the Islamic analogues to an apologist, I’d presume it was more like “defender of the faith” in a non-military sense. It’s not a Catholic thing; C.S. Lewis is the best known Anglican apologist.

The 7 deadly sins have evolved beyond Catholic origins to really be a Western cultural concept. “Deadly” was originally a synonym for “mortal” as in the Catholic concept of mortal (dying unrepentant having committed these imperils your soul) vs venial (dying unrepentant having committed these likely does not imperil your soul) sins; however, non-Catholic Christians tend not to put so fine a point on the distinction seeing as they do not have the sacrament of Confession.

That’s my best read anyway—others know more than I do.


#9

Not really. Anyone who is knowledgeable about the faith can be an apologist. As Christians, we are all called, first of all, to become knowledgable about our faith, and secondly, to explain it to others when called upon to do so.

And are the seven deadly sins/heavenly virtues only a Catholic thing?

The concept originates in Catholicism, but many others have imitated it, including many non-Christians.

Another question, what exactly does the concept “original sin” involve?

“Original sin” is the sin of Adam, when he broke the relationship of the human race with God by disobeying His command not to eat of the fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. Becasue of Adam’s disobedience, everyone now is born into the state of not having a relationship with God, which we call “Original Sin.”

We Catholics believe that the Sacrament of Baptism, which was given to us by Jesus Christ, washes away Original Sin, along with any actual sins that the person may have committed.

The Sacrament of Baptism is the first Sacrament of Initiation (the other two are Confirmation and First Holy Communion) and is the entrance rite of membership in the Church.

There are also four other Sacraments: two Sacraments of Service, which are Marriage and Holy Orders, and two Sacraments of Healing, which are the Rite of Reconciliation (also called Confession) and the Anointing of the Sick (also called Extreme Unction).


#10

No they are a Christian thing… I have heard Non-Catholic Christian preach about them. I’ve seen books written by Non-Catholic Christians regarding the seven deadly sins/heavenly virtues.

A google search will show that….


#11

Thank you Kelly, I’m reading the links now. So it was the first sin that Adam committed.


#12

Cool.:wink:

The seven deadlies get a lot of press in various branches of Protestantism too. The concept’s not unique to Catholicism, though it did originate with it.

Original sin is the idea that Adam’s sin in eating from the Tree of Knowledge was so great that it carried down through his descendants. Everyone then is stained by that sin (after all, we live in a world created by its results), and baptism is the mechanism by which that taint is removed.

Sadly, when I was growing up a Lutheran I didn’t know too much about what I believed in… I first learned about the seven deadly sins from the movie Seven, with Brad Pitt and Morgan Freeman. I once read something about it, but I got the impression that it was strictly a Catholic thing.


#13

Thanks for the list and the link, will be checking that out as well. So the virtues defeat the sins, thank you.


#14

Just wanted to add that “Orginal Sin” is NOT a personal sin.

I like how the relationship between Baptism and Orginal Sin is described in the book Catholicism for Dummies.

[quote=Catholicism for Dummies page 96]You can think of Orginal Sin as being born without any immunity or ability to internally fight sin. On the spiritual level, human beings, born without any resistance to sin, need a spiritual vaccination.

Baptism is to orginal Sin what the polio vaccination to the poliovirus. Baptism restores what should have been–a spiritual resistance or immunnity to sin and temptation.
[/quote]


#15

Originally Posted by Catholicism for Dummies page 96
You can think of Orginal Sin as being born without any immunity or ability to internally fight sin. On the spiritual level, human beings, born without any resistance to sin, need a spiritual vaccination.

Baptism is to orginal Sin what the polio vaccination to the poliovirus. Baptism restores what should have been–a spiritual resistance or immunnity to sin and temptation.

Uh - that doesn’t seem very accurate, to me, since even unbaptized people have the virtue of self-control. I don’t know if I would want to use that explanation, since it raises a lot of troubling questions- baptized persons seem to sin at the same rate as unbaptized persons, everything else being equal.


#16

That was just a tiny quote. The book does go on to say:

[quote=Catholicism for Dummies page 96]Vaccinations only prevent some diseases by helping the human body become resistant to them. But getting shots as an infant does not quarantee that you’ll never get other diseases, such as cancer. Using common sense and good health habits can help prevent other diseases. And just as vaccinations are but first step for a healthy physical life, Baptism is but a first step for a healthy spiritual life. Cultivating a good, healthy spiritual life means avoiding what’s bad for your soul, such as sin and evil, and doing what’s good for your soul–prayers and works of mercy motivated by divine grace
[/quote]

The book also goes on to explain what a Baptism by desire is and a Baptism by blood is and how that fits in.

I’m not about to quote the whole book :p, but I believe that this quote would help explain the first quote better.


#17

I guess. I just have trouble with that analogy, because it makes it seem as though being baptized could prevent a person from sinning in the future. It can’t. All it does is washes away previous sins, including Original Sin, and initiates us into the Church.

If I wanted to give a medical analogy, I would talk about something that radically cures someone of a deadly disease. Doesn’t mean they will never get sick again, but it does thoroughly wipe out any disease that was present at the time. Maybe like radical chemotherapy, or something like that.


#18

You’re right baptism can’t prevent a sin from happening. Vaccinations don’t prevent disease from happening, either.

Both of my kids were vaccinated for Chicken Pox… and they still GOT Chicken Pox! Did the vaccine work? Or did it fail?

Baptism does a little bit more then just washes away sins and initiates us into the Church:

[quote=CCC]1279 The fruit of Baptism, or baptismal grace, is a rich reality that includes forgiveness of original sin and all personal sins, birth into the new life by which man becomes an adoptive son of the Father, a member of Christ and a temple of the Holy Spirit. By this very fact the person baptized is incorporated into the Church, the Body of Christ, and made a sharer in the priesthood of Christ.

1280 Baptism imprints on the soul an indelible spiritual sign, the character, which consecrates the baptized person for Christian worship. Because of the character Baptism cannot be repeated (cf. DS 1609 and DS 1624).
[/quote]

What is Original Sin? Original Sin is the First Sin by Adam and Eve. Their Sin was the sin of disobedience.

Original Sin is transmitted from generation to generation. What is transmitted to each generation is NOT the personal sin that Adam and Eve did (i.e. disobedience). This is because Original Sin is not an actual sin such as disobedience.

So what is passed down?
The natural inclination to sin

Therefore Original Sin is the natural inclination to sin. That is what is passed down generation to generation.

Baptism totally washes away Original Sin so that it is no longer on our soul. It also totally washes away any actual sins on a person soul (which is important to note for those that are baptize later in life example: Adults)

However, by our baptism we also receive God’s Graces and become a temple of the Holy Spirit.

Being a temple of the Holy Spirit means that the Holy Spirit is with us and is helping us fight of any sins that come our way…. Similar to the antibodies that are left behind by the vacciantions that we receive as babies.

They are there to help us fight the fight for whatever disease that comes our way. Just like the Holy Spirit is in us helping us fight what ever sins that comes our way.

Also this does not mean that Holy Spirit only dwells in those that have been baptized by water. That is where the baptism by blood and baptism by desire come in… The Holy Spirit is clearly at work there too!!!

We can help the Holy Spirit fight the fight by living a healthy life style.

We live a healthy life style by avoiding the Seven Deadly Sins and using the 7 Virtues.


#19

They are supposed to prevent the disease for which they are vaccinating from occurring. It puts dead disease cells into the body in order to fortify the white blood cells to attack that disease and prevent it from occurring in the body.

Both of my kids were vaccinated for Chicken Pox… and they still GOT Chicken Pox! Did the vaccine work? Or did it fail?

It failed. If they were vaccinated against chicken pox, then they should never have gotten chicken pox.

Baptism does a little bit more then just washes away sins and initiates us into the Church:
What is Original Sin? Original Sin is the First Sin by Adam and Eve. Their Sin was the sin of disobedience.

Original Sin is transmitted from generation to generation. What is transmitted to each generation is NOT the personal sin that Adam and Eve did (i.e. disobedience). This is because Original Sin is not an actual sin such as disobedience.

So what is passed down?
The natural inclination to sin

The natural inclination to sin is called concupiscience. It is a side effect of Original Sin, but it is not, itself Original Sin. It is also not washed away at Baptism.

Original Sin is the lack of a relationship with God. Baptism restores us to a relationship with God, through the Church.

However, by our baptism we also receive God’s Graces and become a temple of the Holy Spirit.

Yes, that’s true. Being a temple of the Holy Spirit means that we have the duty to follow the teachings of Christ, and that we will become open to hear them and understand them. But it is not a guarantee that we will actually do so. That part is up to us - we have to consciously choose to follow through with our Baptismal promises.


#20

At first I was quite confused about anger being sinful, so I went and did some research and found this article. It was quite helpful. I hope others will find it helpful as well.

Anger
The desire of vengeance. Its ethical rating depends upon the quality of the vengeance and the quantity of the passion. When these are in conformity with the prescriptions of balanced reason, anger is not a sin. It is rather a praiseworthy thing and justifiable with a proper zeal. It becomes sinful when it is sought to wreak vengeance upon one who has not deserved it, or to a greater extent than it has been deserved, or in conflict with the dispositions of law, or from an improper motive. The sin is then in a general sense mortal as being opposed to justice and charity. It may, however, be venial because the punishment aimed at is but a trifling one or because of lack of full deliberation. Likewise, anger is sinful when there is an undue vehemence in the passion itself, whether inwardly or outwardly. Ordinarily it is then accounted a venial sin unless the excess be so great as to go counter seriously to the love of God or of one’s neighbour.

newadvent.org/cathen/01489a.htm

God speed.

Vigis


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