Questions about Femininity/Masculinity


#1

Do you think that women have a religious obligation to act in a feminine way, have feminine interests, and abide by traditional gender roles (ie women run the domestic sphere and men run society).

To what degree should traditional gender expectations inform our behavior?

When are the exceptions?

Should traditional gender roles/norms/expectations affect how we raise our children? Should we discourage masculine endeavors for daughters and feminine endeavors for sons?

I have an opinion but I am very interested in other peoples opinions.


#2

My opinion, for what little it is worth, is to just be yourself. I'm a guy, and I have very little "typical guy" interests, such as cars, handyman work, etc. I've never felt like less of a Christian because I don't like that stuff.

You have the obligation to be a good person, not a "masculine/femine" person.


#3

RascalKing- What are your interests? They may not be cars and handyman repairs but still be masculine.

Our Catholic faith tells us that the outward appearance should symbolize the spiritual reality.
The question is, in trying to represent the mysterious truths of God, do we have an obligation to act in a particularly feminine or masculine way.


#4

In hindsight I think I should have posted this in the philosophy section.


#5

I don't think the Catholic faith touches on the traditional gender behavior as a matter of "religious obligation" by any means.


#6

I don't think the Catholic faith touches on the traditional gender behavior as a matter of "religious obligation" by any means.

Does it matter at all?


#7

[quote="violet81, post:6, topic:222685"]
Does it matter at all?

[/quote]

Matter... as in help/harm our souls?...
No. If it did the Church would have explicitly laid this out.


#8

There are a lot of things the Church doesn't explicitly mention until it feels like it needs to.


#9

I’m not sure I understand what you’re getting at? :confused:
Moral teachings don’t… change.

What are you trying to get at? You said you have an opinion… so share! :slight_smile:


#10

I don't think it matters at all. Plus people are born either masculine or feminine. We can't change what color our skin is, what our sexual orientation is, what color our eyes are, or how masculine or feminine we are.

Why would being a feminine guy or a masculine woman prevent and/or make it harder for anyone to go to Heaven.

How masculine or feminine we are is part of our personality. We can't change our personalities. :thumbsup:


#11

IE...Some of the encyclicals come out because a tradition that has always been accepted is now being challenged.

My opinion?
I am still forming it but I do kind of think it matters. Not necessarily in our salvation but in how effective we are in conforming the culture to our Christian values.

It probably isn't as black and white fitting into the strictest gender stereotypes, but I don't think it is completely irrelevant either.


#12

[quote="violet81, post:11, topic:222685"]

My opinion?
I am still forming it but I do kind of think it matters. Not necessarily in our salvation but in how effective we are in conforming the culture to our Christian values.

[/quote]

But there are lots of different "cultures" all over the world. Christ's message can be applied to any and all... gender roles don't stand in the way of those values...


#13

Who decides what is masculine and feminine? If that is important, we need to have a good source to tell us. Neither tradition nor scripture makes it clear what acceptable hobbies would be for each sex. What about knitting? Women knit, and so do sailors. Who gets to knit?


#14

I am a girl...I lift weights and workout. Many "old fashioned" minded people would say that it is not "lady like". I don't give a dang. I am going to college next year. I DON"T believe a women "place" is in the home. She needs to be independent and strong...NOT weak and timid. Men now a days think that in order to be a man they have to beat their chests and act like a "macho" man. Its rather stupid!!!!

-Rebecca


#15

I would say no. There is no religious obligation. If there was, (and just to use one striking example) why would God have instructed St. Joan of Arc to do what she did? That was very masculine.


#16

[quote="violet81, post:3, topic:222685"]
RascalKing- What are your interests? They may not be cars and handyman repairs but still be masculine.
.

[/quote]


#17

Who decides what is masculine and feminine?

By us.. by the people who form the culture.

If that is important, we need to have a good source to tell us.

Our we can inquire about it, debate it, decide collectively, and then act.

Neither tradition nor scripture makes it clear what acceptable hobbies would be for each sex. What about knitting? Women knit, and so do sailors. Who gets to knit?

I guess it depends on whether the motives were masculine or feminine.


#18

Seriously, who cares? Would you rather someone not be a “Traditional” male/female and be a good Christian or someone who is a “traditional” and a jerk?


#19

But you were originally talking about gender roles as being a “religious obligation”… so that brings up the question - are “religious obligations” really up to the collective culture to decide on?
I don’t think so - that’s why we have the Church to GUIDE us!
And since the Church has not given any definitive guidance on this issue… it’s not a “religious obligation”… :blush:


#20

There are areas for concern and awareness.

Some children develop gender identity disorders that later mature into sexual identity disorders. Children with these disorders (and their parents) can receive family counseling to overcome these psychological problems.

narth.com/docs/fitz.html


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