Questions about "The Dark Knight Rises"

I finally saw “The Dark Knight Rises” a few weeks ago. I know I’m a little late to the party, but there are a few things I wanted to voice and get off my chest. Since my wife isn’t a Batman fan, I’m turning to CAF. Just to set the tone, I liked the movie and thought it was a good way to end this interpretation of the Batman saga. I was drawn into the movie and it wasn’t until a little later that some things came up that I thought were rather odd or didn’t make sense. Warning, spoilers ahead.

Why hold the whole city hostage if your main goal is to blow it up? In other words, why the big, complex plan that gives people time to formulate a strategy to thwart you when you could just press the trigger once the nuke was activated? Granted, you wouldn’t have much of a movie if that was the case.

Why throw Bruce Wayne into a jail where he just can rock climb out? It reminds me of the cheesy Batman television show where the villain would put Batman and Robin into some sort of overly-complex trap, leave, and then they would inevitably escape. Granted, Bruce Wayne was in pretty bad shape when Bane left him, but still, he should have known that Bruce had the potential to climb out given his ninja training.

Miranda turns out to be the mastermind behind the plot to destroy Gothem to avenge her father’s death at the hands of Batman. She explains how she had been planning that revenge for years. But how would she have known that Batman was Bruce Wayne and therefore the target of her vengeance? Maybe she wanted to take revenge on Gothem in general and she didn’t know that Bruce Wayne was Batman. I didn’t follow that part very well.

Where does Bane find all those loyal followers? Unlike the Joker who found some psychopaths to carry out his chaos, Bane has a fairly well equipped army at his disposal. In fact some are so loyal they commit suicide to carry out the master plan. However, I just don’t understand why Bane has such a loyal following.

Why does Bruce Wayne limp at the start of the movie? What was he doing as a recluse that messed up his knee? I know he took a fall at the end of “The Dark Knight” but he was always taking falls as Batman and came out just fine. And just because you’re a recluse, couldn’t he summon a doctor to come over and check him out?

I know the answer to these all are, “it wouldn’t be much of a movie without these.” But they are just little points that bugged me.

Hey,

Great movie. hopefully i can clear a few things up for you. In order-

Why hold the whole city hostage if your main goal is to blow it up? In other words, why the big, complex plan that gives people time to formulate a strategy to thwart you when you could just press the trigger once the nuke was activated? Granted, you wouldn’t have much of a movie if that was the case.

Bane is a complicated character. As the “leader” of the League of Shadows it is his duty to carry out what the former leader, Ras al gul (Liam Neeson from the first movie) was planning on doing- destroying Gotham. Ras trains Wayne to do it and when he does not Ras decides he will do it himself. His plan is to simply poison the water supply and evaporate all the water killing all of Gotham. Batman stops him. The Joker (Ledger) has nothing to do with them and is essentially “chaos”. People are drawn to him because he is like a cult leader. They are following HIM.

Bane is a totally diffrent animal. It is not Bane they are drawn to, rather, it is to his ideas. (This is beautifully illistrated with the scene where the trials are going on and Bane is standing in the crowd). Bane’s plan is to destroy Gotham (like Ras al Gul) and to bring chaos (like the Joker) by making Gotham implode on itself. By saying that some random person in Gotham has the “trigger” the outside world can’t just kill one person. It could be anyone. So inorder to assure the bomb doesn’t go off they would have to kill everyone.

Why throw Bruce Wayne into a jail where he just can rock climb out? It reminds me of the cheesy Batman television show where the villain would put Batman and Robin into some sort of overly-complex trap, leave, and then they would inevitably escape. Granted, Bruce Wayne was in pretty bad shape when Bane left him, but still, he should have known that Bruce had the potential to climb out given his ninja training.

Yeah. Batman has a literally broken back and a metaphorically broken spirit. And, hey, only one person has ever escaped (Miranda). So there is no inevitablity in it. He fails several times before he makes it and even then only because he decided to take the leap of faith to climb without the rope.

The punishment Bane is imposing on Batman is dispair. It’s a brilliant way to visually represent it. (The TV, hole, ect.) Bane counts on dispair both in Gotham and with Batman. Both prove him there is hope (and the end shows this very well too).

Miranda turns out to be the mastermind behind the plot to destroy Gothem to avenge her father’s death at the hands of Batman. She explains how she had been planning that revenge for years. But how would she have known that Batman was Bruce Wayne and therefore the target of her vengeance? Maybe she wanted to take revenge on Gothem in general and she didn’t know that Bruce Wayne was Batman. I didn’t follow that part very well.

She knows Wayne is Batman because her father, Ras al Gul (again, Liam Neeson), trained him. She wants to kill Wayne for killing her father and wants to complete the task of destroying Gotham that her father started and Wayme would not do.

Where does Bane find all those loyal followers? Unlike the Joker who found some psychopaths to carry out his chaos, Bane has a fairly well equipped army at his disposal. In fact some are so loyal they commit suicide to carry out the master plan. However, I just don’t understand why Bane has such a loyal following.

This is a little more abstract. People with ideas can find followers. It is just a matter of where to look. He also has the League of Shadows to draw from. See above for analysis of idea as motivation.

**Why does Bruce Wayne limp at the start of the movie? What was he doing as a recluse that messed up his knee? I know he took a fall at the end of “The Dark Knight” but he was always taking falls as Batman and came out just fine. And just because you’re a recluse, couldn’t he summon a doctor to come over and check him out?**The limp is his time as Batman catching up with him. TDKR takes place 8 years after TDK does. One does not need to be able to run to be a recluse. The knee brace is a great way showing he needs to be “fixed up” to get back to crime fighting status.

Thanks for the response Franciscanguy. I sort of understand all the reasons and motivations for why things happen the way they do in TDKR. And in the context of the Batman world, it all makes sense and makes for interesting story telling. These movies deliver a lot of entertainment as long as you have a willing suspension of disbelief.

It’s when I leave the theater or turn off the DVD player and return to reality that I begin to notice just how overly-complex the villains’ schemes are. But, the Batman franchise (as well as other super hero characters) has always been built on impractical, complex schemes and that’s what we love about them.

One problem with the movie I noticed upon reflecting on it afterwards is that they tried to hard to cram inspiration drawn from too many story lines in the Batman comics over the years into the movie. The Dark Knight is I think in many ways far superior and I would say that while there are moments where the Dark Knight Rises to that quality it doesn’t sustain it overall. The move is trying to borrow from Bane’s debut in comics where he did break Batman’s back and put him out of action for a considerable time. It’s also trying to borrow from The Dark Knight Returns which was the story that in many re-established the character in the mid 1980s and focused on an older Bruce Wayne in his 50’s who has retired and returns as the Batman. Apart from that you have the flotsam and jetsam of a myriad of other stories as inspiration. The Dark Knight although it drew upon the comics to some extent for some characters and storylines managed to tell a story internal to itself and it’s particular vision of a Batman continuity.

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