Questions about the Holy Spirit in Catholicism


#1

Im hoping some can help me out with these, dumb though they may sound. First, why was there a change from Holy Ghost to Holy Spirit? Second, is the such a thing in Catholic thought as Baptism in The Holy Spirit? If so, how is it accomplished? Confirmation, as a Sacrament, leaves a permamnet mark on the soul. If one sins after Confirmation, how does he/she regain unity with the Holy Spirit? Is the Holy SPirit always with us, if so, is it wrong to ask ore than once for its ourpouring upon us?


#2

There ia recent thread here about Baptism In THe Holy Spirit

forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=154192


#3

“Holy Ghost” now sounds rather silly, because English as a language changes. It just means “Holy Spirit”, or “Holy life-force”.

Baptism in the Holy Spirit is Confirmation, it cannot be received more than once.
However the Holy Spirit does not override the will of a confirmed person to prevent him from ever sinning. Confirmed people should go to Confession at least once a year, the same as unconfirmed but baptised children over the age of reason.


#4

As another poster said, due to changes in the English language, “ghost” is now seen more as an occult thing, more specifically the spirit of a dead person. By saying Holy Spirit, we are avoiding the common connotations of ghost.

Baptism in the Holy Spirit is common in the charismatic Catholic movement (as I believe we’re called). Confirmation does indeed leave an indellible mark on the soul. Baptism in the Holy Spirit (which is not sacramental Baptism) is praying for a stirring up of the Holy Spirit in you. Basically, this is simply praying for Actual Grace, and so even though God is always with us, we are not always equally blessed with actual grace, which is why it is not wrong to ask more than once for an outpouring of this grace.
Unity with the Holy Spirit (as well as the Father and the Son) is regained by sacramental Confession.


#5

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