Questions for Lutherans

I read in that article lsb.cph.org/samples/LSB_Sampler.pdf “In the stead and by the command of my Lord Jesus Christ I forgive all your sins In the name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit.”

May I ask you where the pastor gets his authority to forgive sins in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit?

Thanks,
Annie

From the Smalcald Articles:

Part III, Article VII. Of the Keys.

1] The keys are an office and power given by Christ to the Church for binding and loosing sin, not only the gross and well-known sins, but also the subtle, hidden, which are known only to God, as it is written in Ps. 19:13: Who can understand his errors? And in Rom. 7:25 St. Paul himself complains that with the flesh he serves the law of sin. 2] For it is not in our power, but belongs to God alone, to judge which, how great, and how many the sins are, as it is written in Ps. 143:2: Enter not into judgment with Thy servant; for in Thy sight shall no man living be justified. 3] And Paul says, 1 Cor. 4:4: For I know nothing by myself; yet am I not hereby justified.

Jon

Ordination

I also have a question.

I recently lost my beloved step-father to Alzheimers. (cruel disease, btw). He was a baptized Lutheran

Do Lutherans pray for those passed on the way Catholics do?

Correct! From The Augsburg Confession:

Article XIV: Of Ecclesiastical Order.

Of Ecclesiastical Order they teach that no one should publicly teach in the Church **or administer the Sacraments unless he be regularly called. **

Jon

I don’t know about “the way Catholics do”, but many Lutheran funeral rites will offer a prayer that God take our dearly beloved into his loving arms, or similar.

Jon

BTW, I pray the comfort of the Holy Spirit be with you during this time of loss.

Thanks Jon. Do all members of the Church have the power to forgive sins in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit?

Annie

What evidence does one have that one is called?

Annie

See my post #5.

Jon

Who ordains the Pastors?

Annie

What is the evidence that one is called.

Annie

The article by speaking of the regular call is implying ordination.

Jon

I see. That isn’t how I interpreted it. However, who ordains the pastors?

Annie

:thumbsup:

While Catholics would disagree, Lutherans do believe they have valid ordination and apostolic succession. So existing Lutheran pastors ordain newer ones, just as existing Catholic bishops ordain new Catholic priests.

In the Apology, it refers to: If* the pastors *are good men, they will know how far it is of advantage to examine [the young and otherwise] inexperienced persons; etc.
So, obviously, the reference is to pastors, called and ordained.

The Church ordains. The various synods of Lutheranism have various practices regarding ordination. Some ordain within apostolic succession, others like the LCMS use presbyter ordination, but it is always done by the synod involved, hence, the Church.

Jon

Would you say that this goes all the way back to Luther with no interruptions?

Correct, though it is the practice in a growing number of synods to ordain by bishops in succession, the lines of which are either historical within Lutheranism, such as the Scandinavian churches, or resulting from lines within the Anglican churches where Lutheran/Anglican pulpit and altar fellowship has been established. Again, recognizing the disagreement between us as to the validity of these ordinations and lines of succession.

Jon

If you mean back to Luther himself, as if he begins a line of ordination, no. If you mean the practice of presbyter ordination, yes, in those areas where bishops would not ordain pastors/priests evangelische churches.

Jon

So, not all Lutheran ordinations go back to Luther? What makes these people Lutheran? Also do some ordinations go back to Luther?

Annie

What makes a Lutheran a Lutheran is membership in a Lutheran parish. What makes a Lutheran pastor a Lutheran pastor is ordination within the Lutheran Church. A line of ordinations back to Luther may or may not exist, but they would be presbyter ordinations. Luther was never a bishop.

Jon

DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.