Quick question about The Daughters of St. Paul and their methods of publishing


#1

If someone were to join the Daughters of St. Paul, do they have to use their publishing companies for all their works or can they resort to a secular one?
Though I am not 100% sure at this point, their is a slight possibility that I may be called to this order (I do admit, I do feel a little bit antsy typing this out). Here's a link to the forum I posted recently forums.catholic.com/showthread.php?t=751237
The reason I asked the question above is because (as I have stated in the link) I want to write manga. Many of the stories I want to write are fiction that I plan on incorporating Christian themes and morals in them...but, I don't want the audience of my work to be strictly Christian. The idea for my works is to create stories with beautiful messages without the audience feeling like their being preached to. More actions than words. "Preach the Gospel at all times. Use words if necessary." ~St. Francis of Assisi
I get the impression that Pauline works will only be sold in Christian stores and in the Christian section of the bookstore and whatnot.
Get what I'm saying?

Thanks in advance :)


#2

Since the standard definition of manga (Japanese cartoon novels) states that their content is often erotic and violent, how are you going to use this medium to promote Christian values? Manga and Christian values are an oxymoron at best!


#3

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:2, topic:313975"]
Since the standard definition of manga (Japanese cartoon novels) states that their content is often erotic and violent, how are you going to use this medium to promote Christian values? Manga and Christian values are an oxymoron at best!

[/quote]

Not necessarily. I've read plenty of manga that had neither erotic nor violent content. And by your logic, loads of good books that promote Christian values would be oxymoronic--including the Bible.

-ACEGC


#4

I'm not sure if Professed Religious usually write secular literature. If your vocation is as a Religious Sister then prayer and service, such as teaching or nursing, would be your focus and consume most of your time. Instead of posting this question here, why don't you contact the Daughters of Saint Paul and ask them? You could arrange to visit them and go into further discernment. God bless!:D


#5

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:2, topic:313975"]
Since the standard definition of manga (Japanese cartoon novels) states that their content is often erotic and violent, how are you going to use this medium to promote Christian values? Manga and Christian values are an oxymoron at best!

[/quote]

Where did you get that information? Yes, there are bad manga out there just as there are bad books and bad movies etc. That doesn't mean that all books, movies, etc are bloody, pornographic, and whatnot. In fact, having read many manga and watched many anime, I've found that the messages are WAY deeper, WAY more wholesome, and WAY more Christian than MANY American works. I've watched one anime that included a message against abortion, MANY manga with messages AGAINST violence, and stories that convey love in a very pure way many times.
Sorry if I sounded a little angry but, I really dislike it when manga is pushed into the same category as porn or whatever :o


#6

I’d contact the vocations office and ask. I am member of the Pauline family(Holy Family Institute). I know many of the sisters and they are so sweet. One of my favorite blogs is by Sr Anne called nunblog. She may be able to answer your question or direct you to a person who can. God bless.


#7

[quote="edward_george, post:3, topic:313975"]
Not necessarily. I've read plenty of manga that had neither erotic nor violent content. And by your logic, loads of good books that promote Christian values would be oxymoronic--including the Bible.

-ACEGC

[/quote]

I am not going to argue or nit pick with you. I was making a logical conclusion based on having read what to this tim has been entirely a non-christian, secular art form that is definately not in the Western cultural main stream.
Pernaps, there is a way to introduce Christian themes into it, but why bother, unless one is trying to proselytize Japanese comic book readers or perhaps a few college students? I think ones energies would be better spent on other means.
I seriously doubt that more than 2 or 3 percent of Western )European, American or Canadian) youth or young adults even know what manga is! Maybe those who are heavy into the internet, but not those that live normal active lives.


#8

[quote="George_Stegmeir, post:7, topic:313975"]
I am not going to argue or nit pick with you. I was making a logical conclusion based on having read what to this tim has been entirely a non-christian, secular art form that is definately not in the Western cultural main stream.
Pernaps, there is a way to introduce Christian themes into it, but why bother, unless one is trying to proselytize Japanese comic book readers or perhaps a few college students? I think ones energies would be better spent on other means.
I seriously doubt that more than 2 or 3 percent of Western )European, American or Canadian) youth or young adults even know what manga is! Maybe those who are heavy into the internet, but not those that live normal active lives.

[/quote]

You did make a logical conclusion but, in all charity, it was based on flawed premises--

That something is a "non-Christian, secular art form" doesn't necessarily mean that it is opposed to Christianity.

The popularity of manga and anime can hardly place it outside of the cultural mainstream.

Christian themes can be incorporated into any kind of work, any medium, whether evangelization is the thrust of the attempt or not--sometimes artists and writers just happen to write such themes into their work because that's part of who they are, not because they're trying to proselytize, in this case we're not talking about art as some kind of practical tool but as art for its own sake. And the Church has certainly never been one to discourage creativity.

Like it or not, the internet is part of our existence these days, and using the internet with some regularity doesn't necessarily mean one isn't living a normal, active life.

Ultimately, manga and anime and any kind of culturally-located style are not going to be intrinsically good or intrinsically bad; manga of itself is morally neutral, as is any art form. There can be Christian attempts at it too, or at the very least Christian themes written into it and any other form as a natural consequence of the orientation of the writer. I'm not entirely sure what is gained by trying to paint a whole artistic style and genre as being somehow opposed to the faith when really it is neutral--and regardless of its orientation, real evangelization would demand that we engage the culture and learn to see Christ in it and bring Christ to it, not to turn it away for not being good enough. Why bother, you ask? Because souls could be saved.

-ACEGC


#9

I just reread my post and it seems to me that I wasn't thinking before I sent it, and as a result it's less than charitable. Mea maxima culpa. My apologies, Mr. Stegmeir.

-ACEGC


#10

[quote="chris138, post:6, topic:313975"]
I'd contact the vocations office and ask. I am member of the Pauline family(Holy Family Institute). I know many of the sisters and they are so sweet. One of my favorite blogs is by Sr Anne called nunblog. She may be able to answer your question or direct you to a person who can. God bless.

[/quote]

I contacted the vocations director. I sure hope it was the right email.


#11

[quote="Jennifoo, post:4, topic:313975"]
I'm not sure if Professed Religious usually write secular literature. If your vocation is as a Religious Sister then prayer and service, such as teaching or nursing, would be your focus and consume most of your time.

[/quote]

One of the main missions of the DoSP is to use the media to help better the world and lead people to Christ.


#12

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