Racial Mixing and the Tower of Babel


#1

I know some good people that have racially mixed children. I don’t judge on appearance like most, it’s about the person inside that counts. Sadly, nice guys do finish last if ever at all. Judging is up to God in the New Testament. So, if we are supposed to have separated lingually and so forth, is racial mixing anything Churches preach against? Ours welcomes people of all kinds. Still, there’s places like the Westboro Baptist Church and they are (some claim) mostly made up of a large family. They have a major anti-gay thing going on (godhatesfags website). Yet, I haven’t seen anyone fly off the handle with racial mixing. Was the church ever trying to figure it out also? Would it have gotten you torn apart in the Inquisition?


#2

I think you are mixing all kinds of things here. Ironically enough.
No the Catholic church doesn’t tell people who to marry.
Stop reading hate-filled material. Nothing to be learned there.
peace.


#3

Tower of Babel is about world government, not racial mixing. There’s nothing wrong with racial mixing. That’s like saying people with curly hair or blonds shouldn’t mix with people with green eyes.
Also don’t understand what nice guys finish last has to do with anything.


#4

My conclusion, based on considerable reading, is that the Catholic Church has never been particularly concerned with “mixed-race” (a term that I abominate) marriages and blended children. There was a long-standing prejudice against children born out of wedlock, but I don’t recall reading anything against “racial mixing”. Among Protestants, I’m sure there are pockets of resistance and hatred, but those pockets have shrunk and are continuing to shrink.

D


#5

The part about nice guys finishing last is that some people marry outside of the country because they cannot find a suitable spouse. Multi-ethnic people is not what I am referring to. What mean is that a constant practice of such can build a society of similarities to a former society which was destroyed. Apparently the unification of a human species in ancient times was asking for it and I’m not sure how that looks by today’s standards in comparison.


#6

Race is largely a social construct and hasn’t been statically defined. There can be two people genetically similar that may be classified as being of two different races based on slight differences. Additionally a collection of people of a genetic differences may socially be classified under once race.


#7

:face_with_raised_eyebrow:

Race mixing?

That’s a social construct. No one would care now if a Polish married a German in the US. No one. In the 50’s it was so socially bad that they would be rejected from their church and had to find another parish.

But it was never about religion or race, it’s about social constructs. Today races mean little. I am “white” but I am a very different “white” than my husband. I have deeply Mediterranean skin tones yellows and tans. He is pretty much crayola white. He has pink skin tones.

Seeing him, the nurse thought my child had jaundice at birth when we went to her first DR appointment because they looked at his pink skin tone and her yellow one and demanded she receive treatment. Fortunately, a more level headed doctor from India realized that my kid had my skin tone and not his.

So sometimes people are just ignorant. Nothing to do with religion.


#8

“I don’t judge on appearance like most…” What is that supposed to mean?


#9

I read a book about an Irish girl who loved an Italian man. Apparently at the time this was scandalous.


#10

I’d advise you don’t visit sites like the Westboro “Church” one. They are full of hate and evil .


#11

Race is a social construct. Hence Races are not genetically homogenous and lack clear-cut genetic boundaries. The Church has never discouraged inter-racial marriages. Though it has added caution to interfaith marriages due to possible stress and tension on the marriage.

The Spanish Inquisition as you mentioned was originally intended to identify heretics among those who converted from Judaism and Islam to Catholicism, Read here for full article.

The old theory of 5 different racial groups no longer exist. Also National Geographic Genographic Project has been interesting. Below is that migration maps of man;

mtDNA: Maternal Migration Map

image

Y-DNA: Paternal Migration Map

image


#12

I’m not getting the “I don’t judge on appearances like most” part. The Church has never, to my knowedge in my lifetime, taught that a person of one race should not marry someone of a different race if both were Catholic. I know there were US legal prohibitions and societal prejudice against it in the decades before I was born, and it seems likely that individual Church parishes or priests may have been affected by that in the past, but the Supreme Court changed the law by the early 60s, and the prevailing social thought among educated people in the 70s when I grew up was that it was fine to marry outside your racial group if you were prepared to deal with strains on your marriage caused by the societal prejudice you would no doubt encounter (as shown on Norman Lear sitcoms, “Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner”, etc). I would presume a priest in premarital counseling would try to make sure a couple was committed enough to withstand this before he married them. My mother used to speak of an Irish guy she knew who had married a Japanese woman and had a number of mixed children with combined Irish -Japanese features and the whole family would attend Mass together.

Nowadays it would seem to be much less of an issue.

I have no idea what Westboro Baptist, a known hate group, has to do with this discussion as they are disavowed by just about everybody sane whether Protestant, Catholic or something else. Their founder, Fred Phelps, was a major civil rights activist who was honored by the NAACP before he went off the beam and started Westboro, so it’s unlikely his group would ever object to anything on the basis of race.


#13

You are reading too much into this story. The lesson there was not that we shouldn’t mix races, but that we should not aspire to be like God and reach Heaven by our own devices.

Note this comes right after the flood.


#14

There is NO such thing as race mixing as we are all one race: Human. But I do know that the exact same language and arguments that racists have used to be anti mixed marriages are the same ones that many use to be anti gay marriage.


#15

Firstly, the tower of babel is a morality story focused on pride and envy. It’s not meant to be taken literally.

And yes, there are people who twist bible passages to their agenda and preach these sorts of things.

No and no. The Church has never taught anything like that.


#16

Perhaps in some localities there were social pressures on people, but please don’t state that like it was true universally. It was not.


#17

it’s not about that either. It is about aspiring to be God. Envy, greed, pride.


#18

That’s not a universal statement.:face_with_raised_eyebrow: You just pulled a line out of my story and put it out of context.


#19

Biggest boost to racism was essentially the idea that because some societies are not as advanced, they are mentally subpar and therefore subhuman. Therefore, mixing with these subhuman retards would ruin your gene pool. That’s why “racial realists” of our day talk about third world folk ruining the white race. That the white race is endangered. This thinking was behind the race mixing laws in the US.
The Church has never been racist. It has however warned that intermarriages between different cultures can cause a lot of tensions because of lifestyle differences (the parable of the owl and the stork).
While this might be true. We are talking about marrying within a country like the US, where even if we have different races, it’s a (more or less) single culture.


#20

On something else associated with the story of Babel: Language. We’ve already discussed how race is a social construct. Language is too. If you take groups of people and separate them there will be differences in how their language evolves. Many of the European languages have common etymological roots but developed differently in part because of distance, lack of rapid communication, and people mostly socializing with those in their physical proximity. As you increase the distance between communities and consider other obstacles such as large bodies of water and difficult terrain you find that the the differences between the languages become more significant. There were also differences in language that developed from people being separated into social classes (this is one of the things that lead to some words being looked down upon and considered “bad words.” But that’s a conversation for another thread). That language evolves is something that is readily observable by anyone that has tried to ready older documents. It’s something that occurred naturally and continues to occur.


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