Radical New Gas Alternative That Your Kids Will be Using [Hydro-Car]

My friend’s mom showed this to us and we were in awe:

articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2008/03/29/radical-new-gas-alternative-that-your-kids-will-be-using.aspx

A car that gets 300 miles before needing to be refilled, a process which only costs a mere $3! It emits no pollution and runs on the most abundant element in the universe.

Incredible stuff. It will become practically affordable somewhere in the next ten years.

Thoughts?

I have seen this before and am doubtful about is plausibility. We will see, but I do not see it happening.

One must put at least as much energy into the water to get the hydrogen as one will get back when one turns the hydrogen into water.

It’s a perpetual motion machine in a new dress.

According to the thermodynamic class I took, one must put MORE energy into the water to get the hydrogen one will get back when one turns the hydrogen into water.

Hydrogen is a great way to store energy. Automobiles require stored energy. It makes sense that we will have hydrogen cars some day. What we will never have again is penny per mile transportation.

Nohome

No! NO! Don’t confuse me with physics!
There are no hydrogen cars because there’s an e-vil con-spir-acy by BIG OIL and Pres. Bush. He wants to keep the price of oil high so the war won’t end and the Republicans will win.

And who says there’s no perpetual motion machine? Scientists are wrong all the time. The Church killed Leonardo and he turned out to be right.

So there.:stuck_out_tongue:

When did we have penny per mile transportation? I recall when I got my diesel in 1999 fuel was ~$1 per gallon, and with very judicious use of the accelerator I could get 800 miles on a $15 tank. That’s almost 2¢ a mile. It was a long time back that fuel was 50¢ a gallon, and cars were not as fuel efficient then.

[quote=Joe Kelley] One must put at least as much energy into the water to get the hydrogen as one will get back when one turns the hydrogen into water.

It’s a perpetual motion machine in a new dress.
[/quote]

But if we use solar/wind power to extract the hydrogen, there could be some payback.

In the early 60’s gas got as low as $0.18 a gallon in the price wars [as I recall that was the tax per gallon at the time]. I did quite well in my VW. :smiley:

There could be payback even if you used coal since a power plant is far more efficient than an internal combustion engine. The point is hydrogen is available and technically feasible, just not inexpensive.

Nohome

That would do it.

wow thats mad impressive and I really hope it works out!

the current consumerist attitude where we assume the resources of the earth are for our generation alone is . . . baffling . . wer not being very good stewards of creation when we are chopping down forests, polluting oceans and stream and thrusting an unprecedented amount of dangerous chemicals into the air.

So this might be a good step in the right direction!

What concerns me about Hydrogen energy is not the difficulty of the technology…but the fact that it would be so cheap.
Anytime you see the words “cheap…renewable…efficient” it means that someone somewhere is not making any money.
I think the oil companies would like to have the technology ready to go for when they need it, but would hold it back for as long as possible so they can continue to make money on oil.

Years ago, when I was in electronics school, there was a saying they kept telling us:
“We will have abundant solar-powered houses when someone figures out how to run a sunbeam through a meter box”.
Very true.

The cost for obtaining pure hydrogen was expensive because of the process involved.

However, about 6 or 7 months ago, there was an article published that some guy discovered am inexpensive and efficient process for obtaining pure hydrogen.
I don’t have the article at hand and I’m too lazy to go looking for it.

However, it showed promise that the technology will become the energy source for the future.

Jim

Wow, by my calculation, you were getting ~53 miles per gallon. I hope you still have that baby!

Peace

Tim

Yeah, I still have it (VW Golf TDI). I average about 45 mpg. If I do a lot of stop and go, it’s more like 42, and if I take a long trip on highways it’s around 48. Only in unusual situations, where I’m not using the AC and avoiding going over 65 or so can I stretch it out to 800 miles - that’s happened twice in the 9 years I’ve had the car.

Years ago, when I was in electronics school, there was a saying they kept telling us:
“We will have abundant solar-powered houses when someone figures out how to run a sunbeam through a meter box”.
Very true.

You can have it today, if you want:
housingzone.com/article/CA6332828.html

With the utility companies buying excess electricity (and they have to, by federal law), the home ends up with a net zero energy consumption.

Technology is still a bit expensive, so a $150,000 house ends up costing $200,000. But the net zero for utility bills would easily make that a moot point.

This is where it’s going to have to go. As you suggested, energy companies are not all that pleased about it. But builders and home buyers don’t care.

I expect there will be some attempts to repeal the law that makes utilities buy home-produced energy at standard rates.

I just met a guy at the hardware store that was adapting his fourth vehicle to run on used cooking oil, like out of deep fryers at restaurents. His only problem so far has been that they are harder to start in cold, Ohio weather, but he is working on that. One more thing, I had a 58 Volkswagen that in the early 60’s, could run for a penny a mile. I could go from Arizona to Ohio, roughly 2000 miles, for about $20. at that time. It had a 36hp air-cooled engine, but you could really freeze in it in the wintertime.

With the increase number of cities and states looking to ban trans fats, I wonder if the cooking oil strategy is a good idea in the long run? :smiley:

Jim

I really didn’t think this was going to catch on nationally, but I gave the guy credit at least for trying something different. He said he was having trouble finding places where he could find used cooking oil.

I would guess that as the use of trans fats decreases in the food industry, the use of naturally occurring oils will increase - presumably the quantity of waste vegetable oils from restaurants will increase as well.

[quote=davy39]I really didn’t think this was going to catch on nationally, but I gave the guy credit at least for trying something different. He said he was having trouble finding places where he could find used cooking oil.
[/quote]

It used to be easy to get waste vegetable oil from restaurants, but the increased production of biodiesel means the WVO is now worth good money, rather than just being a liability that restaurant owners had to pay to have removed.

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