RCIA Basics please!


#1

Could someone give me a basic rundown? How long it takes on average? Is Easter the only time for completion? Do they run certain times in a year? Is every diocese radically different?

Sorry to ask a a super basic, but these questions have been unanswered since late November/early December. Really would like to know…

thank you!
hopefully, this was the place to post, also.

(I ask while listening to Johnny Cash singing 'He Turned the Water into Wine")


#2

How long? It varies. For someone who is already baptized it should take only as long as the person needs. That could be a few months, a year, several years. For someone who is not baptized it should be at least a year but could easily be two or three. It really depends on the person, where they are spiritually, and what they need.

Easter only? Yes and no. Adults are generally baptized at the Easter Vigil (the night before Easter). Baptized candidates could be received into the Church at any time of year.

Do they run at certain times? Yes and no. Ideally RCIA runs on a year-round basis so people can start and end at different times. In many parishes, however, they run on a school year model so everyone starts in August or September and moves along together.

Is every diocese different? Probably. Every parish is different. The Church has a rite, but it is used in slightly different ways. In part it depends on the resources that a parish has available and how far they can stretch.


#3

Thank you very much.


#4

You can call your Parish office for the times question, but usually in the US, at least, it starts in September and finishes at Easter Vigil, about once a week with a retreat in there someplace on a week-end.

I don’t think anyplace is “radically different” but maybe we define radically differently. :smiley:


#5

Unfortunately most US diocese are uninspiredly the same. By that I mean they lump both baptized and unbaptised into the same group and run them through the Fall to Easter program. This is despite the statement in the rite that no undue burden should be placed on those already baptized.

If you are lucky you can find a parish that does year round RCIA or has individual instruction. In my case I was received 2 weeks before Ash Wednesday. If I had stayed in the program I started in it would have been the week after Easter.

One part that seems to rarely be done is the period of mystagogy. This is the period (generally a year) following baptism/reception where the neophytes are supported and nourished in there new faith. It is a time to deepen their understanding, but alas most get perhaps a couple weeks if they are lucky.


#6

Hi there,

Our RCIA sessions at our parish here in the UK, run from late September to late April with a break for Christmas in between.

The sacraments of initiation are received at the Easter Saturday Vigil. There are a couple of sessions of Mystagogia afterwards and a final celebration. I guess it varies from parish to parish depending on resources and the material they wish to cover.

Thanks,
FG


#7

I agree that they tend to just lump people together, but it’s done for the sake of the educators. There may not be enough to individually prepare 20-30 candidates and catechumens.

As for mystagogia, I’ve observed that once they are baptized and confirmed, the new Catholics just stop coming to classes. Maybe one or two in the class are interested in deepening their knowledge. Then again, our parish offers educational opportunities each Sunday (through the school year) between Masses, so I guess if the new Catholics join those classes, they gain further understanding of the faith.


#8

Thank you all. September, huh? A family member was given a rushed opportunity to complete by Easter. I seemed to have missed the boat. Perhaps this is why the Deacon never returned my calls. Even asked in person, no one would address it at those times except to call. I have been trying since late November.:frowning:
How unfortuante.
Again, thank you all. :thankyou:
I’d apreciate your prayers.

Blessings to all.
You will be in my prayers.


#9

[quote="cheezey, post:8, topic:312280"]
Thank you all. September, huh?

[/quote]

It depends on the parish. If you were in my parish you could start immediately. Unfortunately, a year-round program is ideal but not universal. You might want to call other nearby parishes to see if you could start sooner.


#10

=cheezey;10272874]Could someone give me a basic rundown? How long it takes on average? Is Easter the only time for completion? Do they run certain times in a year? Is every diocese radically different?

Here’s a brief summary

Typlically RCIA runs from BTS [August] until Easter

This can vary by region and Parish [longer; but seldom shorter]. While differences do exist; I woulod personally not refer to them as “radically different”.

Easter is the normal entry date because it is the Thee most important day of the Church year for Catholics and Christians. It was Christ Rising from thre Dead that makes our Eternity, by our freewill choice, heaven or Hell.

By Christ Life and Death He became the Redeemer of all humanity for all of time. This means primarily that the Gate of heaven BLOCKED by the Sin of A & E was offeset; and access to heaven once again became a conditional possibility.

By Christ Life; Death and RESURRECTION Christ also becomes conditioanlly our Savior as Well. The process of salvation is muti-stepped and the key to heavens access rest with Peter alone [Mt. 16:15-19] and through Him todays CC.

The REASO for what some think as “a LONG time” period *:slight_smile: has to do with our 2,000 YEARS of Tradition and experience. There is MUCH to know [far more than the typical RCIA program can accomidate IMO]; and the knowledge is critical.

The Sacraments of Iniation are Christian Baptism; Holy Communion /the Eucharist [REALLY Jesus:thumbsup:] and Confirmation. In confirmation one makes a Covenant with our God to Know; to Live and to Share our Faith. If one is not informed; such cannot enter fully into this Sacrament; so important to our possible salvation.

Sorry to ask a a super basic, but these questions have been unanswered since late November/early December. Really would like to know…

thank you!
hopefully, this was the place to post, also.

(I ask while listening to Johnny Cash singing 'He Turned the Water into Wine")

Awesome; I hope and pray this fills your need?

God Bless,
pat/PJM here on this Forum*


#11

An adult makes that covenant when he/she decides to be baptized. Confirmation completes Baptism and is done to you, it’s not something you do. Since it can be conferred on infants, it doesn’t require knowledge to gain the Graces and the Gifts of the Holy Spirit that it provides.


#12

=Phemie;10276809]An adult makes that covenant when he/she decides to be baptized. Confirmation completes Baptism and is done to you, it’s not something you do. Since it can be conferred on infants, it doesn’t require knowledge to gain the Graces and the Gifts of the Holy Spirit that it provides.

WOW! :shrug:

So your saying that Confirmation does not create a Covenant relationship?

Of course Confirmation asks for, and demands a “personal COMMITMENT” ie. a “confirmation”.

And just as clearly there is as ought to be a difference in Infant Baptism done to and FOR someone; and adult Baptism sought by someone.

Thank you for your post

God Bless you,
pat


#13

Do you think the relationship is different after confirmation than it was after baptism? How?

Of course Confirmation asks for, and demands a “personal COMMITMENT” ie. a “confirmation”.

And yet infants can be confirmed as well as baptized. In the Eastern church that’s the norm. In the Western church it can be done in danger of death. Since infants can’t make a commitment, the theology of the sacrament can’t demand one.

Consider this section from the Catechism:

1308 Although Confirmation is sometimes called the “sacrament of Christian maturity,” we must not confuse adult faith with the adult age of natural growth, nor forget that the baptismal grace is a grace of free, unmerited election and does not need “ratification” to become effective.


#14

That covenant was created at Baptism.

Of course Confirmation asks for, and demands a “personal COMMITMENT” ie. a “confirmation”.

This is not a sacrament that we do, it’s a sacrament that we receive and by which we receive the gifts of the Holy Spirit that complete the Grace of Baptism through the laying on of hands. Once baptized, we are required to complete our initiation by being Confirmed and receiving Communion – and until 1910 it was done in that order. It’s about completing our initiation, not about showing our commitment. Since babies can be confirmed (and routinely were until the bishop was no longer able to be at all baptisms), the sacrament requires no knowledge and no commitment to be effective.

And just as clearly there is as ought to be a difference in Infant Baptism done to and FOR someone; and adult Baptism sought by someone.

Thank you for your post

God Bless you,
pat

T


#15

=SuscipeMeDomine;10279302]Do you think the relationship is different after confirmation than it was after baptism? How?

Speaking I assume od adults here?

Each sacrament provides the Grace of that patricular sacrament. In the sense that ALL sacraments are a potential sourse for Grace; they are the same. But each Sacrament exist for it's primary purpose.

Baptism for the removal of Original Sin and critically important, membership ito the family of God. {yes I do do all the other things as well:)]

Confirmation takes one to the next level so to speak. It stregthens; encourages; provides the Gifts of the HS, and demands [dare I say????] a "more active" or perhpas; better yet; a pro-active response, than that which exist in Baptism; but is a more dormant manner. When I think of Confirmation the one word of Christ that comes to mind most often is GO!:D Matt 28:19-20

It's not a matter of "More", but different Grace aimed at its own commitment; and that comitment being more pro-active; more outward than baptism's inner workings. YES they do overlap. Yes in some ways they are the same; and yes Baptism too calls for the same type of commitment.

But it SEEMS TO ME; that Baptism is sort of take care of yourself first; then Go... while Confirmation building on the foundation of Baptism and the Eucharist; is a more direct charge to Live and TO SHARE our Faith.:)

Gosh, I hope I'm making a degree of sense here:shrug:

And yet infants can be confirmed as well as baptized. In the Eastern church that's the norm. In the Western church it can be done in danger of death. Since infants can't make a commitment, the theology of the sacrament can't demand one.

I would point out that the one set of keys was handed to Peter:) It's certainly not wrong; but is it better? NOT IMO.

Consider this section from the Catechism:

1308 Although Confirmation is sometimes called the “sacrament of Christian maturity,” we must not confuse adult faith with the adult age of natural growth, nor forget that the baptismal grace is a grace of free, unmerited election and does not need “ratification” to become effective.

1298 When Confirmation is celebrated separately from Baptism, as is the case in the Roman Rite, the Liturgy of Confirmation begins with the renewal of baptismal promises and the profession of faith by the confirmands. This clearly shows that Confirmation follows Baptism. When adults are baptized, they immediately receive Confirmation and participate in the Eucharist.

As this is a issue of "Church practice" its changable. The question then would seem to be that IF Rome thought the Eastern led to more souls being saved; Rome would morally be obligated to chage it. Yes?

1309 Preparation for Confirmation should aim at leading the Christian toward a more intimate union with Christ and a more lively familiarity with the Holy Spirit - his actions, his gifts, and his biddings - in order to be more capable of assuming the apostolic responsibilities of Christian life. To this end catechesis for Confirmation should strive to awaken a sense of belonging to the Church of Jesus Christ, the universal Church as well as the parish community. The latter bears special responsibility for the preparation of confirmands.

I'm enjoying our debate; God forbit someone should think we are arguing:D

God Bless,
pat/PJM


#16

The poor OP is probably wondering why a thread on what RCIA is all about has turned into a discussion on sacramental theology. Might I suggest starting a new thread on Confirmation?


#17

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:16, topic:312280"]
The poor OP is probably wondering why a thread on what RCIA is all about has turned into a discussion on sacramental theology. Might I suggest starting a new thread on Confirmation?

[/quote]


SMD, you are correct....

:confused::confused::confused:
honestly, my head is reeling. And I thought I knew much of the Faith of Christ. (I do, but again, my head is reeling from a system overload of more doctrines than I knew of and understood. I meekly suggest another thread for what does indeed seem like a healthy, spirited, well-intended discussion. Just one with which I cannot partake right now. I am glad these threads last; good for reference a bit later.

I am facing homelessness in a week. No money, no human emotional support. I will not last. I am humanly afraid. I am greatly disappointed that nothing ever came in the form of interest, return phone calls, and direct contacts about RCIA. After two months. Feeling as vulnerable as I do right now, I feel as if I am not of this life; as if I am but an unguided guest. The next life will indeed be great; I ask His forgiveness for the following:

***Lord, forgive me if I am wrong, but I just don't think You want me to go this way. I cannot believe it. But who am I to know your plan. But then again, it is not for homelessness itself that You died. I am no good to You this pained. I just don't know because I cannot hear You. I cannot hear You because....I don't know....Forgive me. I simply cannot serve You here this way. If I feel this so strongly, that this is not your plan for me, doesn't this mean that this is You speaking? I don't know. There are things I know that need no further explanation.
I love You. You love me. Help me to take this log out of my eye that I may take the speck out of the eyes of Your other children. This is all I want. To actively help. You do not need my help, but I want to. And now I am so overwhelmed, unable to do much at all, that I feel like my life is indeed drawing to a close. If this is Your will, I welcome it. I just don't think it is. Please forgive me.


I have always loved Jesus, but Good Friday 2010 really struck me as it never has. Couldn't sleep and found EWTN in the wee hours, watched it live from Rome. Watched the repeat next morning, and was just as overcome. And now I just want to show Him how stunned and amazed I am that He died for me. Born of God's love and He died for me with His. He died for me. And brutally. Oh, My Lord, He really died for us


#18

=cheezey;10280414]********

SMD, you are correct…

:confused::confused::confused:
honestly, my head is reeling. And I thought I knew much of the Faith of Christ. (I do, but again, my head is reeling from a system overload of more doctrines than I knew of and understood. I meekly suggest another thread for what does indeed seem like a healthy, spirited, well-intended discussion. Just one with which I cannot partake right now. I am glad these threads last; good for reference a bit later.

I am facing homelessness in a week. No money, no human emotional support. I will not last. I am humanly afraid. I am greatly disappointed that nothing ever came in the form of interest, return phone calls, and direct contacts about RCIA. After two months. Feeling as vulnerable as I do right now, I feel as if I am not of this life; as if I am but an unguided guest. The next life will indeed be great; I ask His forgiveness for the following:

***Lord, forgive me if I am wrong, but I just don’t think You want me to go this way. I cannot believe it. But who am I to know your plan. But then again, it is not for homelessness itself that You died. I am no good to You this pained. I just don’t know because I cannot hear You. I cannot hear You because…I don’t know…Forgive me. I simply cannot serve You here this way. If I feel this so strongly, that this is not your plan for me, doesn’t this mean that this is You speaking? I don’t know. There are things I know that need no further explanation.
I love You. You love me. Help me to take this log out of my eye that I may take the speck out of the eyes of Your other children. This is all I want. To actively help. You do not need my help, but I want to. And now I am so overwhelmed, unable to do much at all, that I feel like my life is indeed drawing to a close. If this is Your will, I welcome it. I just don’t think it is. Please forgive me.


I have always loved Jesus, but Good Friday 2010 really struck me as it never has. Couldn’t sleep and found EWTN in the wee hours, watched it live from Rome. Watched the repeat next morning, and was just as overcome. And now I just want to show Him how stunned and amazed I am that He died for me. Born of God’s love and He died for me with His. He died for me. And brutally. Oh, My Lord, He really died for us

HAVE FAITH in God!

He Loves you!:thumbsup:

Your in our thoughts and prayers my friend:gopray::signofcross::gopray2::crossrc::nun1:

IF God closes a door on you SEEK the Window hw WILL open for you

God Bless,
pat/PJM


#19

Cheezey, I'm so sorry to hear about this. I hope things will start going better. Jesus did come for homelessness...and illness and suffering of all types. Even in his most painful moments he showed us what faithfulness means. He's there with you now and will continue to be, no matter what. Hang in there and know that you have my prayers.


#20

:thankyou:

:bighanky:


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