RCIA - It's finally time to finish the swim


#1

I have lurked and posted here periodically for several years and am very grateful for your patient answers and persistant prayers. I just wanted to share with you that I have requested a release of membership in my LCMS congregation and am attending a wonderful RC church nearby along with 2 of my sons. We will be entering RCIA in September and it’s honestly a huge relief.

The vestiges of my Lutheran upbringing and practice will likely remain, but it seems that the bits that will stick are the same things that are already Catholic. I am indebted to the many sincere and thoughtful Lutherans that have shaped me and my family.

Thank you again for your gentle (well, mostly) teaching and encouragement.

-Jan


#2

Congratulations, and welcome home! May I ask what is it that really clinched it for you?


#3

It all came down to authority, really. The congregational model, as I have experienced it, is nearly unworkable today because partisanship has infected even the churches. Consistancy of teaching and practice is lacking and I had to ask why? I became convinced that there really was something to Apostolic Succession and Tradition which holds the Church accountable from generation to generation. I realized that inspite of a problematic Pope or two over the years that the foundations of the Church did not change. This was what was promised to us.

And I suppose the really big thing was discovering that I believe that I’m not just filthy rags covered under His righteousness, but a part of the Holy Bride of Christ that He is conforming me to be.


#4

THANK YOU JESUS and WELCOME HOME!


#5

This is so wonderful! Church authority turned out to be the most important, too.


#6

Please bear in mind that, like anything else, there are “good” RCIA classes and “bad” RCIA classes. I hope you get into a good one, but don’t be afraid to challenge the presenters if they seem to go off the rails. And if you get into a “bad” one, remember you can check anything in the catechism, or online, or here.


#7

Amen to that.

Welcome Home

God Bless


#8

That’s beautiful! Welcome home!! I’m so glad you are feeling that peace and relief of crossing the Tiber. God bless you through this journey!


#9

And don’t be afraid to ask questions! I’d write things down during the week. I kept a journal/notebook to write things down. Kept all handouts organized in a 3-ring binder.


#10

May your RCIA journey be blessed. If it turns out to be less than you expected, always remember, you aren’t limited to just the material they present. Look around, talk to the priest, google search, ask here if you are yearning for more, I’m sure everyone will be glad to help.


#11

:arrow_up:︎ THIS :arrow_up:

Alternatively don’t be afraid to shop around for a good RCIA program and a good parish. You’ve been here long enough to probably have a decent sixth sense for theological BS so don’t let the presence of such in a particular program or parish deter your conversion. I myself dropped out of RCIA twice from two separate parishes and eventually I found an orthodox parish with a good RCIA program and a professional, accredited director. Third time was a charm!


#12

Yes, in my RCIA class, we just went over the scripture readings and talked about what they meant to us personally, and if any word or words jumped out at us. It wasn’t bad, as far as it went. But all that stuff that a new person needs to know, like going into the church, what do you do first, and why do you do it? Then what? And what are the different parts of the service, and why do we kneel for the parts that we do? I bought a used book on “Introduction To the Mass,” which explained a lot–why we are doing or saying this or that, and what it all means. Also, my sponsor went to Mass with me and did some more explaining. Later on, I gave the Mass introduction book to the church associate doing the RCIA class, in case somebody asked him for more information on the basic “nuts & bolts” of the Mass, maybe he could pass it along and it could help somebody else. (Or he might take the clue and do more teaching along those lines.)


#13

Congratulations and God bless you on your journey.


#14

You won’t regret it. Take things on here with a pinch of salt - and the best thing is enjoying the sacraments


#15

Update: My husband of 36 years has decided to join me in the RCIA journey. He went to his first Mass last week, and said that this is his first time in decades that he has actually longed to go to church. St. Monica’s life has always resonated strongly with me and I have timidly asked for her prayers for a while. This was an absolutely stunning result.


#16

Welcome home! I went through the RCIA process and came into the Church this year. It was a great experience. May yours be awesome as well! God Bless!


#17

Yea! I love to hear this. I came in Easter 2017. St. Monica is my patron saint - my prayers are for my son and daughter. Enjoy RCIA!


#18

Welcome, Welcome, Still Dreamn.
May God bless you and your husband!
AMEN!


#19

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