RE: Prots. being "Separated Brethern"--where to find?


#1

Where can I find any documentation from the Pope (quotes) or elsewhere about how our Prot. brothers and sisters are “separated brethern” and why??


#2

I believe the term was brought into wide use at Vatican II. You could probably find that on vatica.vc


#3

Is it the “separated” or the “Brethren” part you are most interested in? This is what I found so far:

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:
818
"However, one cannot charge with the sin of the separation those who at present are born into these communities [that resulted from such separation] and in them are brought up in the faith of Christ, and the Catholic Church accepts them with respect and affection as brothers. . . . All who have been justified by faith in Baptism are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers in the Lord by the children of the Catholic Church."

855
"The Church’s mission stimulates efforts towards Christian unity. Indeed, ‘divisions among Christians prevent the Church from realizing in practice the fullness of catholicity proper to her in those of her sons who, though joined to her by Baptism, are yet separated from full communion with her. Furthermore, the Church herself finds it more difficult to express in actual life her full catholicity in all its aspects.’"

For more:
usccb.org/catechism/update/july96.htm

From “Crossing the Threshold of Hope” by Pope John Paul II:

Yes, indeed, we can truly ask ourselves: Why did the Holy Spirit permit all these divisions? In general, the causes and historical development of these divisions are well known. It is legitimate, however, to wonder if there is perhaps a metahistorical reason as well. There are two possible answers to this question. The more negative one would see in these divisions the bitter fruit of sins committed by Christians. The more positive answer is inspired by trust in the One who is capable of bringing forth good even from evil, from human weakness. Could it not be that these divisions have also been a path continually leading the Church to discover the untold wealth contained in Christ’s Gospel and in the redemption accomplished by Christ? Perhaps all this wealth would not have come to light otherwise.

For more: catholic.net/RCC/POPE/HopeBook/chap23.html


#4

While none of what I copied above has the exact term “separated brethren,”, the first paragraph copied does use “separation” and “brothers” in the same sentence.

Anyway, hope that helped in some way.

Peace.


#5

Direct from the 2nd Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on Divine Revelation:

  1. Easy access to Sacred Scripture should be provided for all the Christian faithful. That is why the Church from the very beginning accepted as her own that very ancient Greek translation; of the Old Testament which is called the septuagint; and she has always given a place of honor to other Eastern translations and Latin ones especially the Latin translation known as the vulgate. But since the word of God should be accessible at all times, the Church by her authority and with maternal concern sees to it that suitable and correct translations are made into different languages, especially from the original texts of the sacred books. And should the opportunity arise and the Church authorities approve, if these translations are produced in cooperation with the separated brethren as well, all Christians will be able to use them.

vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/documents/vat-ii_const_19651118_dei-verbum_en.html

Just check the 2nd Vatican Council’s documents here:

vatican.va/archive/hist_councils/ii_vatican_council/

do a ctrl + f “separated brethren” and you’ll find all the occurances. I’m sure there’s more instances of it that aren’t in Vatican II, but that’s where the term started being used.

God bless,


#6

isn’t title of thi thread violation of forum rules? ie “prots”, derogatory term.


#7

PROTS is a much friendlier term then I refer to them . . . lets not be so PC


#8

[quote=nobody]Is it the “separated” or the “Brethren” part you are most interested in? This is what I found so far:

From the Catechism of the Catholic Church:
818
"However, one cannot charge with the sin of the separation those who at present are born into these communities [that resulted from such separation] and in them are brought up in the faith of Christ, and the Catholic Church accepts them with respect and affection as brothers. . . . All who have been justified by faith in Baptism are incorporated into Christ; they therefore have a right to be called Christians, and with good reason are accepted as brothers in the Lord by the children of the Catholic Church."

855
"The Church’s mission stimulates efforts towards Christian unity. Indeed, ‘divisions among Christians prevent the Church from realizing in practice the fullness of catholicity proper to her in those of her sons who, though joined to her by Baptism, are yet separated from full communion with her. Furthermore, the Church herself finds it more difficult to express in actual life her full catholicity in all its aspects.’"

For more:
usccb.org/catechism/update/july96.htm

From “Crossing the Threshold of Hope” by Pope John Paul II:

Yes, indeed, we can truly ask ourselves: Why did the Holy Spirit permit all these divisions? In general, the causes and historical development of these divisions are well known. It is legitimate, however, to wonder if there is perhaps a metahistorical reason as well. There are two possible answers to this question. The more negative one would see in these divisions the bitter fruit of sins committed by Christians. The more positive answer is inspired by trust in the One who is capable of bringing forth good even from evil, from human weakness. Could it not be that these divisions have also been a path continually leading the Church to discover the untold wealth contained in Christ’s Gospel and in the redemption accomplished by Christ? Perhaps all this wealth would not have come to light otherwise.

For more: catholic.net/RCC/POPE/HopeBook/chap23.html
[/quote]

Thank you so much “nobody” and everyone who replied. Appreciate it so much!!! Yes, these references from the Catechism really help tremendously!


#9

[quote=jjwilkman]isn’t title of thi thread violation of forum rules? ie “prots”, derogatory term.
[/quote]

I think it was just used in order to save space on the thread title. Why is an abbreviation derrogatory?


#10

[quote=Genesis315]I think it was just used in order to save space on the thread title. Why is an abbreviation derrogatory?
[/quote]

I’ve not seen any protestant protesting the preposterous use of the pejorative term prots, so I propose we use the term prots as shorthand for protesting protestants. :slight_smile:
That’s just my opinion - as a protesting protestant. :slight_smile:

Peace…


#11

The term “separated brethren” is used repeatedly in Vatican II’s Decree on Ecumenism:

Everywhere large numbers have felt the impulse of this grace, and among our separated brethren also there increases from day to day the movement, fostered by the grace of the Holy Spirit, for the restoration of unity among all Christians.

But even in spite of them it remains true that all who have been justified by faith in Baptism are members of Christ’s body, and have a right to be called Christian, and so are correctly accepted as brothers by the children of the Catholic Church.

Nevertheless, our separated brethren, whether considered as individuals or as Communities and Churches, are not blessed with that unity which Jesus Christ wished to bestow on all those who through Him were born again into one body, and with Him quickened to newness of life-that unity which the Holy Scriptures and the ancient Tradition of the Church proclaim.

These are: first, every effort to avoid expressions, judgments and actions which do not represent the condition of our separated brethren with truth and fairness and so make mutual relations with them more difficult; then, “dialogue” between competent experts from different Churches and Communities.


#12

Pope Leo XIII seems to have used the phrase “separated brethren” for non-Catholic Christians in a couple of his encyclicals:

25 July 1898 Caritatis Studium (On the Church in Scotland)

5 September 1895 Adiutricem (On the Rosary)


#13

[quote=Todd Easton]Pope Leo XIII seems to have used the phrase “separated brethren” for non-Catholic Christians in a couple of his encyclicals:

25 July 1898 Caritatis Studium (On the Church in Scotland)

5 September 1895 Adiutricem (On the Rosary)

[/quote]

I knew it was in use prior to Vat II but could not remember when it started. I think you have found the source. Thanks

(is Vat II a perjoritive?) :stuck_out_tongue:


#14

[quote=jjwilkman]isn’t title of thi thread violation of forum rules? ie “prots”, derogatory term.
[/quote]

No more that CC, RC, RCC, etc. The correct term is “The Catholic Church”


#15

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