Read any good book lately?

I’ve recently come to realize that a lot of the fiction books I’ve read have a lot of morally objectionable content. This Lent I’m making a very concerted effort to clean up the “grey” areas of my life and especially to only read things that are truly Christian. So, I’ve gotten rid of all my questionable books.

Now, I’m kind of at a loss as to where to find good, Christian literature. I know there are a lot of Christian authors out there, but are there Catholic ones as well? Some of the so-called Christian authors still write about divorcees remarrying and other such things Protestants allow as if it’s a good thing. I simply don’t want to read that kind of stuff anymore.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

[quote="k8e308, post:1, topic:234867"]
I've recently come to realize that a lot of the fiction books I've read have a lot of morally objectionable content. This Lent I'm making a very concerted effort to clean up the "grey" areas of my life and especially to only read things that are truly Christian. So, I've gotten rid of all my questionable books.

Now, I'm kind of at a loss as to where to find good, Christian literature. I know there are a lot of Christian authors out there, but are there Catholic ones as well? Some of the so-called Christian authors still write about divorcees remarrying and other such things Protestants allow as if it's a good thing. I simply don't want to read that kind of stuff anymore.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

[/quote]

You can read my novels! See the website in my signature. Two of the main characters in the novels are devout, practicing Catholics.

My novels are about a synchronized skating team (figure skating), and the target audience is older children, teens, and young adults, as well as the parents of figure skaters. But people who know nothing about figure skating like my novels because of the plots, the characters, and the romance! :heart: The second novel in the series (The Capitol Ghost) is a Rosary story.

I recently read a wonderful and inspiring missionary story by LeAnne Hardy called The Wooden Ox. It's written by a Protestant, but I see nothing in the book that Catholics would find objectionable, and much that they would appreciate. I especially like the way the book imparts such dignity to the African characters, and I also love the way the book affirms the worth of every person, including the "bad guys." The book is based on the author's missionary experiences in Africa. Here's a link to her website:

leannehardy.net/

Note: I've read several of Ms. Hardy's books, too, and like them. Not Catholic, but very faith-filled and nothing anti-Catholic. All pro-Jesus and pro-family.

Have you ever read The Hiding Place, by Corrie ten Boom with John and Elizabeth Sherrill? This book is such a modern classic. Yes, again, it's about Protestants, but there is nothing in the book that would offend Catholics. Indeed, it's one of the first Protesant books that I read as a teenager where I saw an affirmation of Catholicism; when Corrie is released from the concentration camp, she gives the Bible to a Catholic woman who she knows will continue to lead the Bible readings and prayer times in the barracks.

Yes, I realize that these recommendations are not the "classic" Catholic novels, like the stuff by Flannery O'Connor, or the works of the saints. That kind of stuff is "literary" and very good to read. The books I've suggested are much lighter reading, meant to enjoy and be inspired by, not to "improve your mind!" (Although my books are actually written at an 8th grade reading level, compared to Harry Potter books which are written at a 6th grade reading level.)

Would you consider war novels and history textbooks to be Catholic? if not, then i'm stumped. if yes, i would recommend Adolf Hitler's autobiography, Mein Kampf. its really good; especially for me since I LOVE WAR

[quote="k8e308, post:1, topic:234867"]
I've recently come to realize that a lot of the fiction books I've read have a lot of morally objectionable content. This Lent I'm making a very concerted effort to clean up the "grey" areas of my life and especially to only read things that are truly Christian. So, I've gotten rid of all my questionable books.

Now, I'm kind of at a loss as to where to find good, Christian literature. I know there are a lot of Christian authors out there, but are there Catholic ones as well? Some of the so-called Christian authors still write about divorcees remarrying and other such things Protestants allow as if it's a good thing. I simply don't want to read that kind of stuff anymore.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

[/quote]

The Loser Letters (available by this very website)

The Brazilian author Paulo Coelho is Catholic and has some excellent and well-acclaimed books - the most famous is probably 'The Alchemist', which I am reading and is an excellent book.
I also found the book "Sophie's World" by Jostein Gaarder to be a fascinating read - it's very philosophical but I read it having no knowledge of philosophy and found it very accesible. Whether the author is Christian or not, I have no idea but the book is still very interesting.

I found a site catholicfiction.net/
Having not personally used it I can't vouch for it but it's a place to start.

[quote="Cyclophile, post:4, topic:234867"]
The Loser Letters (available by this very website)

[/quote]

Yes, and "Unplanned", "The Screwtape letters, and Father Elijah (which I just finished reading). I too am not reading anything that is not the least religious.

I"m also reading Pope Benedict's latest, Jesus of Nazareth, but its a little difficult reading.

Michael O'Brien and Louis de Wohl are both Catholic writers (O'Brien's books tend to be apocalyptic and de Wohl writes superb novels about the lives of the saints... not fiction, but "novelized" accounts of their lives.)

If you don't mind non-Catholic Christian novels, but don't want to deal with divorce issues, then I recommend Beverly Lewis's novels about the Amish. She has several series out ("Abram's Daughters","The Heritage of Lancaster County", "Annie's People", "The Courtship of Nellie Fisher" and her latest, "The Rose Trilogy" of which the second book is coming out this month) and they are also fascinating looks at the Amish culture.

If you like mystery or suspense with very little gore and almost no objectionable language and situations, I always recommend my two favorites: Mary Higgins Clark's romantic suspense (though I would recommend staying away from "Stillwatch" and "Weep No More, My Lady" because there are a few elements you may find objectionable) and Aimee and David Thurlo's Sister Agatha mystery series.

Marcus Grodi (of the Coming Home Network) published a novel, "How Firm a Foundation" that is loosely based on his own conversion story and is a good read.

Try Flannery O'Connor. She can be challenging but well worth the effort. Here is a nice article on her life and fiction.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flannery_O'Connor

I just reread Jane Austen’s “Persuasion” and “Mansfield Park” a few weeks ago. Both are morality tales. So they talk about immorality but completely reject it. The heroines do nothing objectionable and are always the the voice against immorality. “Persuasion” is the shorter of the books, so if you have never read any Jane Austen I recommend that one first. (Well actually I recommend “Pride and Prejudice” as a first read because that is the best, wittiest, and easiest read with the best heroine). :thumbsup:

Have been trying to find out if the book HEAVEN written by Randy Alcorn is of properly A Catholic book to read???

Left to tell, Led by Faith, Our Lady of Kibeho; all by Immaculee Ilibagiza. Wonderful stories - all non fiction personal narratives. Definitely worth reading.

What a great question! And what a worthy endeavor for you to align your pleasure reading with your faith. Personally, I stick with dead British authors from the 19th and 20th century; they write well, they have great wit and they do not provoke or offend. Death Comes for the Archbishop by Willa Cather is a good American Catholic story though the author was not Catholic. G.K. Chesterton, Pope John Paul II,Hilaire Belloc will challenge you and lift you up! Graham Green The Power and the Glory. Scott Hahn's (not dead!) books are very readable contemporary non-fiction books about the Catholic faith .

I also recommend two prolific British authors from the last century: Rumer Godden and Margery Sharp. These two women were masters of plot and character development and wrote with intelligence and an appreciation of human nature. Rumer Godden had a very deep Christian spirituality. Not sure if she was Catholic or Anglican. She wrote two novels about women in religious life: Black Narcissus and In This House of Brede. Each story very different from the other, but both excellent. Most libraries have Rumer Godden, Margery Sharp is harder to find unless you search to buy used books online.

Finally, a couple authors who are not Catholic, but their books never offend: Daphne DuMaurier wrote dramatic and exciting novels and PG Wodehouse is great for laughs.

Enjoy your endeavor!

Boundaries by Cloud & Townsend.

It's an excellent read for people-pleasers like me who want to be ex-people-pleasers!

Kristin Lavransdatter by Sigrid Undset. Its a trilogy about a women who lived in the middle ages in Norway. At that time Norway was a Catholic country, as were all European countries at that time. However there were still a lot of pagans and belief in nature gods too. It's extremely long, but I will guarantee you, it's a real page turner!

I'm working on one! The hero is a fallen-away Catholic, but the heroine is a practicing Melkite Catholic. Watch them kick butt and save lives. (And crave coffee):coffeeread:

I've written for national Catholic periodicals and publishing houses for a long, long time. I know most Catholic book publishers have a hard time selling Catholic fiction but e-books are making more Catholic-themed fiction available. This may be the beginning of a whole new day for Catholic novels because authors can make their books directly available to readers at a very low price. (Less than a cup of Starbucks coffee.)

(Before I looked into all this, I didn't know e-books don't need an e-book "reader" like a Kindle. Any computer works just fine. So do a lot of newer cell phones and iPods.)

Most of my novels have Catholic characters and situations, and Catholic themes. (Without, I hope, any mini-sermons because they are novels.)

I would appreciate any CAF members taking a look at my two latest ones and telling me what you think. "Pope Bob" is for grown-ups. And "My Great-grandfather Turns 12 Today" is for 8- to 12-year-olds.

http://www.billdodds.com/Pope_Bob_110219e_bdcom.jpg

http://www.billdodds.com/cupcake%206%20bdcom.jpg

Thank you so much.

Bill

www.BillDodds.com

I've been reading the Father Dowling series by Ralph McInerny. Also there was a short series by Bud McFarlane that I read that I enjoyed

[quote="k8e308, post:1, topic:234867"]
I've recently come to realize that a lot of the fiction books I've read have a lot of morally objectionable content. This Lent I'm making a very concerted effort to clean up the "grey" areas of my life and especially to only read things that are truly Christian. So, I've gotten rid of all my questionable books.

Now, I'm kind of at a loss as to where to find good, Christian literature. I know there are a lot of Christian authors out there, but are there Catholic ones as well? Some of the so-called Christian authors still write about divorcees remarrying and other such things Protestants allow as if it's a good thing. I simply don't want to read that kind of stuff anymore.

Does anyone have any suggestions?

[/quote]

If you like fiction, I would recommend "SONS OF CAIN". It is a new book by Val Bianco, and you can get it on Amazon in ebook format. It's a real page turner about the modern day real life fight against evil. Val Bianco debuted his book at the Gathering of Catholic Men in Pittsburgh just a few weeks ago.

Dr.Scott Hahn was also at the event. Dr. Scott Hahn writes about all things Catholic. His conversion story is especially interesting. If you google his name you will find dozens of books. Mike Aquilina also has many interesting titles. If you want specific recommendations on these 2 authors, let me know.

Thank you so much for those who sent me an e-mail about "Pope Bob." I admit the plot seems a little . . . out there.

Also, I wanted to publicly thank Catholic Digest magazine for making it the editor's "Top Pick" in the May issue:

"This imaginative tale of an alcoholic pope who sneaks out on a bender
and ends up on Seattle's Skid Road speaks powerfully about human weakness,
addiction, friendship and redemption." --Dan Connors, Editor-in-Chief

http://www.billdodds.com/Pope_Bob_110219e_bdcom.jpg

BillDodds.com

[quote="Bill_Dodds, post:19, topic:234867"]
Thank you so much for those who sent me an e-mail about "Pope Bob." I admit the plot seems a little . . . out there.

Also, I wanted to publicly thank Catholic Digest magazine for making it the editor's "Top Pick" in the May issue:

"This imaginative tale of an alcoholic pope who sneaks out on a bender
and ends up on Seattle's Skid Road speaks powerfully about human weakness,
addiction, friendship and redemption." --Dan Connors, Editor-in-Chief

http://www.billdodds.com/Pope_Bob_110219e_bdcom.jpg

BillDodds.com

[/quote]

There's a good book also by Dion DiMucci out---the title is "Dion the Wanderer talks Truth". It is also on Amazon but unfortunately not in E book form.

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