Read any good book lately?

I recently read Awakening by Claudia Cangilla McAdam. It was the most Catholic book I have ever read that was fiction! It is about a girl in 8th grade (or so; I forgot) who gets sick and dreams--or maybe doesn't dream it, we don't know--that she goes back in time to the first Holy Week. It is very well-written.

This is an awesome thread! I too have been trying to stay away from questionable books and prefer to read solid Catholic fiction. but since I can easily read 2-4 books a week, this has been hard to do. I've been primarily reading a lot of Saints in between my fiction. I'm a big fan of Bud McFarlane's books (I so want to have a group of friends like that!) and Michael O'Brien's books as well.

I look forward to checking out the other recommendations.

Having read the Loser Letters a month or so ago, I zapped some CS Lewis into my Kindle.. I'm reading the Screwtape letters now.

so much of it is applicable to me so far (me taking on the role of 'the patient'), its scary. It's actually helped me these last few days with a personal struggle that's been plaguing me as of late.

I also have a copy of Washington ny Ron Chernow that I am chewing through right now.. .really good stuff there.

[quote="Bill_Dodds, post:16, topic:234867"]
I've written for national Catholic periodicals and publishing houses for a long, long time. I know most Catholic book publishers have a hard time selling Catholic fiction but e-books are making more Catholic-themed fiction available. This may be the beginning of a whole new day for Catholic novels because authors can make their books directly available to readers at a very low price. (Less than a cup of Starbucks coffee.)

(Before I looked into all this, I didn't know e-books don't need an e-book "reader" like a Kindle. Any computer works just fine. So do a lot of newer cell phones and iPods.)

Most of my novels have Catholic characters and situations, and Catholic themes. (Without, I hope, any mini-sermons because they are novels.)

I would appreciate any CAF members taking a look at my two latest ones and telling me what you think. "Pope Bob" is for grown-ups. And "My Great-grandfather Turns 12 Today" is for 8- to 12-year-olds.

http://www.billdodds.com/Pope_Bob_110219e_bdcom.jpg

http://www.billdodds.com/cupcake%206%20bdcom.jpg

Thank you so much.

Bill

www.BillDodds.com

[/quote]

I'll be checking out your link soon... my fiction tastes lean towards Sci Fi generally but those look interesting....

I've been reading more on economics lately, from a Catholic perspective. If you're interested:

John Medaille: Toward a Truly Free Market

Angus Sibley: The "Poisoned Spring" of Economic Libertarianism

I'm currently reading Thomas Merton's 'The Sign of Jonas', and it is one of the most beautiful pieces of theology I've ever read (a field in which I am sorely unschooled).

I am also flicking through the latest translation of Dante's 'La Vita Nova', and its one of the worst I've read. Good translators are like gold dust these days.

An Exorcist Tells His Story, by Fr. Gabrielle Amorth, Chief Exorcist of the Vatican. It was a good read. Fr. Amorth writes about his experiences with those possessed and his eyewitness accounts of other Exorcisms.

[quote="Cyclophile, post:24, topic:234867"]
I'll be checking out your link soon... my fiction tastes lean towards Sci Fi generally but those look interesting....

[/quote]

Please let me know what you think about them. Thanks for taking a look.

www.BillDodds.com

[quote="Bill_Dodds, post:28, topic:234867"]
Please let me know what you think about them. Thanks for taking a look.

www.BillDodds.com

[/quote]

Bill, I thoroughly enjoyed Pope Bob! In all honesty, I was prepared to be disappointed, but you swept me up in the story and kept me there. I'll recommend it to anyone who asks. :) thank you!

I'm reading Fulton Sheen's Life of Christ and Ven. Louis of Granada's The Sinner's Guide right now. Anyone read the Compasse series? I've read the first 4 or 5 and they are quite good.

I ordered a collection of VLG's writings from Tan Books and am eagerly awaiting that. Also ordered Gangland to Promised Land by John Pridmore after listening to a CD of his. Looking forward to that as well.

[quote="michelleds, post:29, topic:234867"]
Bill, I thoroughly enjoyed Pope Bob! In all honesty, I was prepared to be disappointed, but you swept me up in the story and kept me there. I'll recommend it to anyone who asks. :) thank you!

I'm reading Fulton Sheen's Life of Christ and Ven. Louis of Granada's The Sinner's Guide right now. Anyone read the Compasse series? I've read the first 4 or 5 and they are quite good.

I ordered a collection of VLG's writings from Tan Books and am eagerly awaiting that. Also ordered Gangland to Promised Land by John Pridmore after listening to a CD of his. Looking forward to that as well.

[/quote]

Thank you! Your kind words mean a lot to me.

www.BillDodds.com

I heard the show on Absolute Relativism (via podcast) and I was all set to order (wow, only $2.95?? ) until I saw the shipping price.. $11 and change for shipping? Really? .. I'll cruise by my local store and hope they have it.

saintsbooks.net/BooksList.html
saintsbookscatechisms.blogspot.com/
basilica.org/pages/ebooks.php
everycatholicblog.blogspot.com/

Many saints books, from Saints such as St. Gemma Galgani, St. Francis Xavier, St. Therese of Lisieux, St. Teresa of Avila, St. John of the Cross, and more. All for free and to be saved on your computer.

May the Merciful Jesus bless you

Mitch Albom is my favorite author. He is Jewish. He's the author of Tuesdays with Morrie, The Five People You Meet in Heaven, For One More Day, and Have a Little Faith. While he isn't Christian, his books are embraced my members of all faiths.

Tuesdays with Morrie- In his first book, Albom writes about meetings he would have with his old college professor who was dying of ALS. As he was dying, Morrie (the professor) would have Mitch come over to his house every Tuesday and they would discuss life. These meetings were called "classes". It was a course on living taught through a dying man's perspective. The book is the "thesis paper" Albom, the student, wrote after Morrie died. Jack Lemon stars in the film version as Morrie.

The Five People You Meet in Heaven- "This is the story about a man named Eddie." That's the opening sentence. This is Albom's first novel and probably his most famous work. Eddie is a man who works at an amusement park and dies on duty (an accident with one of the rides) while saving a girl's life. The concept of the book is that Eddie doesn't feel as if he is important or made much of an impact in life, so when he arrives to Heaven, he meets five people who's lives have been impacted by Eddie, both good and bad. A very wonderful book about how we are all connected to one another. "There are many stories, but they are all one." In the film version John Voight plays Eddie.

For One More Day- Albom's second novel. Former MLB player Chick played in the World Series. You'd think he'd be happy. But no. He's an alcoholic, his wife left him, and his daughter shut him out of her life (she didn't invite him to her wedding). He returns to his hometown determined to kill himself. When he jumps off the water tower, not only did Chick survive, he sees his dead mother- the one person who always believed in him. Chick then goes on to spend a day with his dead mother. The premise of the book is: What if you could have one more day with a person you love who has passed away?

Have a Little Faith- Albom's latest book and his first non-fiction book since Tuesdays with Morrie. Albom's Rabbi comes up to him and asks him to deliver his eulogy. Is the Rabbi dying? No. But he says that when the time comes, he wants Albom to deliver the eulogy. So, Albom spends time with his Rabbi, to really get to know him as a person. Think of it as spending time with your priest to get to know him as a person. At the same time, Albom is working with a local charity to repair the roof of a local Detroit church. While working on the church, he meets the pastor, a former drug dealer turned addict turned Christian pastor. As Albom gets to know his rabbi and this pastor, he starts to better appreciate the differences and the similarities between the two faiths. The message of the book is how religion is a driving force for good and central to people's lives and how God can affect the lives of others.

I highly suggest these books for anyone. Truly wonderful reads and beautiful books with beautiful messages.

May I also suggest reading Cormac McCarthy's play, The Sunset Limited. It's a conversation between a poor devout Christian (Black) and a suicidal atheist professor (White). Black saves White from jumping in front of an oncoming train, the Sunset Limited. Black then takes White (who doesn't appreciate being saved) to his apartment and they discuss life, faith, and death. It does a very good job with these subjects from a Christian perspective of hope and atheistic nihilism. When asked about faith, McCarthy says it's a struggle for him and it depends on which day you ask him. I believe you can see that in this book.

Cormac McCarthy is said to be one of the greatest living writers we have. I would highly suggest The Sunset Limited. One of his most famous novels, The Road is dark and somewhat depressing, but it is the story of a father who loves his son. It's a story about fatherly and sacrificial love.

I also found Jostein Gaarder's book "Sophie's World" is a fascinating read - it's philosophical, but I have not read the philosophy of knowledge and found it very accesible. Whether the author is a Christian or not,WOW Gear I do not know, but still very interesting book.

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