Reading of the Gospel in Latin and Greek

Out of curiousity, what were the viewers thoughts on the proclamation of the Gospel in Latin and Greek??? In particular, I am curious about thoughts and reactions from the Eastern Catholic Rites and the Eastern Orthodox. I personally found the unity amazing in the choice. The Gospel sung in Greek was a beautiful reminder to Roman Catholics, particularly of the Uniterd States, of the Universality of the Catholic Church. Does anyone know if this is always done on the election of the Pope??? Thanks and God Bless.

If nothing else, I think it sends a strong signal to the Orthodox Church, and that Pope Benedict would like a closer relation between the two. I think the whole Mass sets the tone for his Pontificate.

The Latin Gospel was beautifully sung. I loved the Greek. The crowd applauded loudly after the Greek.

[quote=Ani Ibi]The Latin Gospel was beautifully sung. I loved the Greek. The crowd applauded loudly after the Greek.
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For what it’s worth, it certainly seemed that the Orthodox Patriarchs and Metropolitans in attendance seemed to be pretty happy - everytime the camera panned over to them it looked like, as a group, they were smiling.

[quote=mtr01]For what it’s worth, it certainly seemed that the Orthodox Patriarchs and Metropolitans in attendance seemed to be pretty happy - everytime the camera panned over to them it looked like, as a group, they were smiling.
[/quote]

Which is a good start. They appreciate the gesture, and the meaning behind it. I think the Pope is off to a good start, and hopefully it will continue.

I think that until the inauguration (I do dislike that word I have to say!) of Benedict XVI, the special Mass was always - more or less - Latin orientated. I think I read somewhere that they decided to incorporate some of the Eastern Catholic aspects of worship so as to show the universality of the Catholic Church. Whilst the Pope is seen as the pre-eminent leader of the Catholic Church, he is also the Patriarch of the Western Patriarchate so it is right and proper that it should follow the Latin customs. Nevertheless, it was a good idea to incorportate the Greek chanting – was that the Maronite Patriarch that was next to the Pope when they were undertaking the epiclesis?

Anton

The proclamation of the Gospel in both Latin and Greek at Papal Masses at Saint Peter’s is an ancient and venerable practice, less seen in recent times.

Yes, it was the Maronite Patriarch.

Many years,

Neil

By the way, what did the Pope reply in Greek before the Gospel was sung?

I was sure he spoke Greek from the first moment I heard his “e” in Latin. :smiley:

[quote=Milliardo]If nothing else, I think it sends a strong signal to the Orthodox Church, and that Pope Benedict would like a closer relation between the two.
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Yeah, he’d like a closer relationship. Just as JPII did, and he did everything but backflips to establish ties to them - without success. The Orthodox don’t consider us anything other than heretics, and they certainly aren’t going to convert to a “heretical” religion, not for a Pole and certainly not for a German.

The reading of the Gospel in Latin and Greek dates back to the time of the old Roman Empire. During the Imperial era, the language of the Eastern Empire, and consequently, the Eastern Church, was Greek, and the Western Empire, and consequently, the Western Church, Latin. The presence of both in the Inaugural Mass signifies that the Pope is the head of both East and West.

[quote=chevalier]By the way, what did the Pope reply in Greek before the Gospel was sung?

I was sure he spoke Greek from the first moment I heard his “e” in Latin. :smiley:
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Mmmm Greek chant… much more enjoyable to hear and sing than prostopinije. Unfortunately, I don’t know what His Holiness said :frowning: Perhaps it was “Let us stand aright to hear the Holy Gospel. Peace be with you.” or “Let us be attentive.” Mmmm Greek chant…

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