Readings Today Different from Missal?


#1

For the last couple of Sundays, we noticed that the readings during Mass were not the ones in the Missal. Any ideas why that would happen? (We’re still pretty new so sorry if it’s a silly question.)


#2

Check for feast days. We used readings for the feast of the dedication of St. John Lateran, which is Nov 9th.


#3

Which missal are you using?

Does it have specific dates printed on the pages (Sunday, November 9, 2014) or is it “perpetual” meaning that it just says “32nd Sunday of Ordinary Time”?

If it’s the perpetual type, what source are you using to determine the page numbers?


#4

It has the dates printed on the pages. So, we were looking at today’s page but the readings were different.


#5

If your intent is honest, no question is silly. None of us slipped out of the womb with these answers.

There are three cycles, first off, of readings for Sunday Mass. Are you sure you’re on the right cycle? They are called a, b, and c.

I’m sure you are on the right cycle. Here’s what’s going on. Today was the feast of St. John Lateran, the first (in terms of honor) and greatest of all churches. Last Sunday was All Souls Day. Such feast days have their own special readings, tailored to the feast day itself. Expect readings about Peter during his feast day. Expect readings about the Temple on a day like today.

During such occasions, the readings might be swapped out in favor of the feast day readings. I’m sure there are rules governing this, but this is basically it.

Edit: for a helpful reminder, remember that most feast days are fixed on a date, and not a day. Easter is fixed on a day (Sunday). Christmas is fixed on a date (Dec 25th). Because the feast of, say, St. John the Baptist, is going to be moving around on the calendar from year to year, occasionally it’s going to land on a Sunday, and the Sunday readings will probably change to reflect the happy occasion of the day: St. John the Baptist’s feast day. The liturgical calendar can help color and inspire our spiritual lives, and so I hope you come to love these changes.

It will be helpful to you to have a Catholic calendar that displays the feast days. Then start planning ahead for how to celebrate your favorite saints! Like La Pucelle, Joan of Arc, whose feast is May 30th (although I think it’s not on the liturgical calendar right now, but I still celebrate it. There is only room for so many and I guess they had too many Europeans)


#6

Any chance you remember the actual texts?

I can tell you the most likely reason is that today is not the 32nd Sunday of Ordinary Time. Instead, the feast of the dedication of the Archbasilica of St John, which is always on November 9, takes precedence over the numbered Sunday.

It’s possible that whoever setup the books for Mass chose the wrong page (easy enough to do).

Same thing happened last Sunday.
It was the commemoration of All Souls which is always November 2.
Even if the All Souls readings were done, there are 38,600 possible combinations for the readings on All Souls Day (in case you’re wondering), and the hand missals don’t have enough space to print all the available readings.


#7

True in both the OF and the EF today. I was a little surprised at that.


#8

Thank you for the replies! It makes sense now that the readings were for the feast days.


#9

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