Ready to Revert but


#1

Don't know how to go about returning the the Catholic Church. What steps must I take?

:shrug:


#2

Show up at a local Catholic church and pick up a bulletin. You will see confession times posted. Go to confession. Talk to the priest. You'll make his day too. That's what he's there for.

Welcome home.

We missed you.


#3

[quote="spockrates, post:1, topic:184026"]
Don't know how to go about returning the the Catholic Church. What steps must I take?

:shrug:

[/quote]

That depends on what you need.

Some people are ready to go. They've been away from the Church for some period of time and now they're ready to come back. All they need to do is go to confession and return to Mass.

Some people may need more support. And it's there for them. If you're one of this group then you may want to make an appointment with the pastor to talk over your situation and see what the parish has to offer. Some parishes have programs aimed at returning Catholics. In others you may want to get involved in whatever type of faith formation they have available -- adult education programs, small Christian communities, or whatever else they offer.

I don't know how long you've been away from the Church, but there are some other things to consider.

Have you received all of your sacraments of initiation (Baptism, First Communion, and Confirmation)? If not, then ask the parish about what you'll need to do to receive the sacraments.

Are you married? Were you married in the Church? If not, you'll want to talk with the pastor about convalidating your marriage, that is, bringing it into the Church.

Do you have children? Are they baptized? What kind of faith formation have they received? You'll want to look into what your parish offers for children's education.

Don't let any of this overwhelm you. Right now you're responding to God's invitation in your life and that's a wonderful thing. Be thankful you've heard him! And welcome home!


#4

I have recently deepened my understanding of the faith through joining an adult Catholic book club which was reading the book, "The Faith Explained," by Leo Trese. This book was a tremendous help to explain the "why"s of our faith and how we should live every day. Many older members of our faith expect people to just believe, and that's fine, but Leo Trese gives more answers. It should be required reading, in my opinion. If you don't want the "labor" of reading a book, I suggest watching Father John Corapi's DVDs instead of reading. Make sure you get the one where he tells the story of his life as a Hollywood jet-setter before he became a priest. Personally, I know more about Catholicism than ever before. I only wish I would have learned this much a few decades ago. It's never too late!


#5

Catholics Come Home


#6

[quote="Liberanosamalo, post:2, topic:184026"]
Show up at a local Catholic church and pick up a bulletin. You will see confession times posted. Go to confession. Talk to the priest. You'll make his day too. That's what he's there for.

Welcome home.

We missed you.

[/quote]

Good advice.

Only thing I may add is that OP may want to go to the priest outside of regularly scheduled hours, especially if he has been away a long time.

I know, around here, many churches only offer 1-2 hours (some churches only offer 30-45 min. a week) where a preist will be in the confessional. Because of this, there is a decent sized line (usually 5-6 people) and it could be unfair to those who go regularly and only have to confess a couple of things - especially if one takes 15-20 min of the 1 hour scheduled.

Also, your priest may be able to discuss and give you custom tailored advice to your reversion (i.e. were you married/divorced outside of the chruch during this time? Do you have children that need to be baptized? and so on), without feeling rushed.


#7

My parish has just begun a series of 6 classes for those interested in returning. It was “advertised” in announcements placed in the pews during the Christmas season and has been very successful. Your parish may have something similar.

If you are only in the just thinking about it stage, buffalo’s suggestion of Catholics Come Home is a good place to start. For that matter, everyone should see their opening video which includes 2 awesome promotions (they named Epic and Movie).

RCIA may or may not be recommended for you depending on your status. Even if it is not the best fit, just sitting in on the classes may be very helpful. The RCIA coordinator at your parish has the experience, or knows where to go, to address many possible status issues as well.


#8

Call the parish office at a Catholic church close to you - they’ll put you in contact with the right folks.

Start going to mass - now - just don’t receive communion till AFTER you’ve received proper preparation (this will vary depending on your situation).

You can also join a faith-sharing group at a local parish - call around to find one that fits for you - don’t be bashful or afraid to try a few to find one that ‘fits’ best. This you can do now too.

Keep asking Lots of Questions. All will be happy to answer!!

-YBIC,
GaryR.


#9

[quote="Liberanosamalo, post:2, topic:184026"]
Show up at a local Catholic church and pick up a bulletin. You will see confession times posted. Go to confession. Talk to the priest. You'll make his day too. That's what he's there for.

Welcome home.

We missed you.

[/quote]

Thank you for your kind words, Liberano!

:)


#10

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:3, topic:184026"]

That depends on what you need.

Some people are ready to go. They've been away from the Church for some period of time and now they're ready to come back. All they need to do is go to confession and return to Mass.

Some people may need more support. And it's there for them. If you're one of this group then you may want to make an appointment with the pastor to talk over your situation and see what the parish has to offer. Some parishes have programs aimed at returning Catholics. In others you may want to get involved in whatever type of faith formation they have available -- adult education programs, small Christian communities, or whatever else they offer.

I don't know how long you've been away from the Church, but there are some other things to consider.

Have you received all of your sacraments of initiation (Baptism, First Communion, and Confirmation)? If not, then ask the parish about what you'll need to do to receive the sacraments.

[/quote]

Yes, yes, and yes. Although, when it comes to Confirmation, I'm sure I've forgotten more about Catholicism than most Protestants will ever know!

:D

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:3, topic:184026"]

Are you married? Were you married in the Church? If not, you'll want to talk with the pastor about convalidating your marriage, that is, bringing it into the Church.

[/quote]

Yes, nearly 20 years. We were married in a Weslian Church.

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:3, topic:184026"]

Do you have children? Are they baptized? What kind of faith formation have they received? You'll want to look into what your parish offers for children's education.

[/quote]

Yes, two sons--one in high school and one in middle school. Both were baptized in an Evangelical Presbyterian Church.

[quote="SuscipeMeDomine, post:3, topic:184026"]

Don't let any of this overwhelm you. Right now you're responding to God's invitation in your life and that's a wonderful thing. Be thankful you've heard him! And welcome home!

[/quote]

Thank you for the welcome.

:)


#11

[quote="ManOnFire, post:4, topic:184026"]
I have recently deepened my understanding of the faith through joining an adult Catholic book club which was reading the book, "The Faith Explained," by Leo Trese. This book was a tremendous help to explain the "why"s of our faith and how we should live every day. Many older members of our faith expect people to just believe, and that's fine, but Leo Trese gives more answers. It should be required reading, in my opinion. If you don't want the "labor" of reading a book, I suggest watching Father John Corapi's DVDs instead of reading. Make sure you get the one where he tells the story of his life as a Hollywood jet-setter before he became a priest. Personally, I know more about Catholicism than ever before. I only wish I would have learned this much a few decades ago. It's never too late!

[/quote]

Agreed!

:thumbsup:


#12

[quote="buffalo, post:5, topic:184026"]
Catholics Come Home

[/quote]

Thanks for the link, Buffalo. Have you ever been there? (Buffalo, NY, I mean.)


#13

[quote="spockrates, post:12, topic:184026"]
Thanks for the link, Buffalo. Have you ever been there? (Buffalo, NY, I mean.)

[/quote]

The Buffalo/Niagara area is my home.:thumbsup:

Grand Canyon of the East


#14

Got me degree at SUNY outside of Rochester. Met my wife there. Small world.

:slight_smile:


#15

[quote="ComputerGeek25, post:6, topic:184026"]
Good advice.

Only thing I may add is that OP may want to go to the priest outside of regularly scheduled hours, especially if he has been away a long time.

I know, around here, many churches only offer 1-2 hours (some churches only offer 30-45 min. a week) where a preist will be in the confessional. Because of this, there is a decent sized line (usually 5-6 people) and it could be unfair to those who go regularly and only have to confess a couple of things - especially if one takes 15-20 min of the 1 hour scheduled.

Also, your priest may be able to discuss and give you custom tailored advice to your reversion (i.e. were you married/divorced outside of the chruch during this time? Do you have children that need to be baptized? and so on), without feeling rushed.

[/quote]

Thank you, Geek. I consider myself a Geek, too. I work for a software corporation.

:)


#16

[quote="lutherlic, post:7, topic:184026"]
My parish has just begun a series of 6 classes for those interested in returning. It was "advertised" in announcements placed in the pews during the Christmas season and has been very successful. Your parish may have something similar.

If you are only in the just thinking about it stage, buffalo's suggestion of Catholics Come Home is a good place to start. For that matter, everyone should see their opening video which includes 2 awesome promotions (they named Epic and Movie).

RCIA may or may not be recommended for you depending on your status. Even if it is not the best fit, just sitting in on the classes may be very helpful. The RCIA coordinator at your parish has the experience, or knows where to go, to address many possible status issues as well.

[/quote]

Thanks, Lutheric. I believe I know what the truth is and I'm the kind of person who must go where the truth leads. Just not sure what the process is. What is RCIA, and is it required?


#17

Thank you, Garyr.

:slight_smile:


#18

** Welcome home! :extrahappy:
1. Pray and talk to God - several times a day, in whatever way seems to get you closer to Him. Learn to talk to God the Father, the Son and the Holy Spirit...all 3 Persons not just a 'generic' God... :gopray:

  1. Read books, listen to music [Gregorian chants work best for me, but there are many pop rock & other genres within Christian music], and go online to learn :compcoff:

  2. Do NOT pay attention to the discussions about WHO is MORE Catholic than anybody else! [that turns off anyone!] By definition, Catholic means 'universal' or 'all-inclusive'...so disregard them! Yes, you are in the right place! ;)

  3. Get a Bible -that you will like reading so that you DO read it!- and a Catechism of the Catholic Church to use for reference, it is VERY useful! :coffeeread:

  4. Go to Mass [no Communion for now, until you go to Confession & the priest tells you if you can - it depends on your particular situation] AND go to Confession...you won't die and it will make you feel much better!

  5. Begin with the basics: the Commandments, the basic prayers, then move on to the next level with something like the Rosary or the Divine Mercy Chaplet these are optional but helpful**] :juggle: and with reading about the saints and how they lived and faced life's challenges...if you find a few that you feel a commonality with, you can talk to them, we DO believe in the Resurrection! You will begin to notice 'signs' from them that will be meaningful to you in particular

  6. If available, go often -for as long or little as you can- to Adoration of the Exposed Blessed Sacrament or -if not available- to a church before or after Mass, and go near the Tabernacle...He is there all the same, just not 'visible' in any form...you will learn to sense His Presence after a few times -PRICELESS!- There are many brief 'guides' to help you begin this process

  7. Do whatever process the priest tells you in Confession that you need to follow, depending on your circumstances, it may or may not involve formal catechesis, maybe he just recommends readings and receiving the Sacraments often for a while -to strengthen you on the journey- :heaven: and if you don't like a particular priest * then go to another but remember it's NOT about the priest! or the church or the music or the 'fellowship' - it's about the GOD and the Sacraments and the Communion of the Saints!

  8. DO begin a relationship with Mary and ask for her guidance in your spiritual journey and protection from evil and confusion - she ONLY leads to Jesus!

  9. ENJOY the JOURNEY!!! :tiphat:
    *


#19

[quote="Sunflower15, post:18, topic:184026"]
...
4. Get a Bible -that you will like reading so that you DO read it!- and a Catechism of the Catholic Church to use for reference, it is VERY useful! :coffeeread:

[/quote]

Thanks for the advice, Sunflower.

:)

My aunt, who used to be a nun, sent me a Catechism (even though she does not like me much).

:rolleyes:

[quote="Sunflower15, post:18, topic:184026"]

  1. Go to Mass [no Communion for now, until you go to Confession & the priest tells you if you can - it depends on your particular situation] AND go to Confession...you won't die and it will make you feel much better!

[/quote]

Hmmm. Not sure how well that will go over: "Bless me father for I have sinned. It has been a good 30 years since my last confession."

:eek:

[quote="Sunflower15, post:18, topic:184026"]

  1. If available, go often -for as long or little as you can- to Adoration of the Exposed Blessed Sacrament or -if not available- to a church before or after Mass, and go near the Tabernacle...He is there all the same, just not 'visible' in any form...you will learn to sense His Presence after a few times -PRICELESS!- There are many brief 'guides' to help you begin this process

[/quote]

Yes, there is an Adoration Chapel at the local parish. Someone with whom I recently spoke suggested I go to it. What can you tell me about it?

[quote="Sunflower15, post:18, topic:184026"]

  1. Do whatever process the priest tells you in Confession that you need to follow, depending on your circumstances, it may or may not involve formal catechesis, maybe he just recommends readings and receiving the Sacraments often for a while -to strengthen you on the journey- :heaven: and if you don't like a particular priest * then go to another but remember it's NOT about the priest! or the church or the music or the 'fellowship' - it's about the GOD and the Sacraments and the Communion of the Saints!
    *

Well, I've been baptized, received communion, and was confirmed in the Catholic Church when I was young. It sounds like I'll need some further religious education, though?

:shrug:

[/quote]


#20

[quote="spockrates, post:19, topic:184026"]

Hmmm. Not sure how well that will go over: "Bless me father for I have sinned. It has been a good 30 years since my last confession."

Well, I've been baptized, received communion, and was confirmed in the Catholic Church when I was young. It sounds like I'll need some further religious education, though?

:shrug:

[/quote]

I think Priest's LOVE to hear the words, "it's been 30 years since my last confession.." It means you're back!! :thumbsup: Not sure how much religious education you'll need. My husband came back after being gone for 25 years. He was Catholic ---> became a born again Evangelical -----> then reverted back to the Catholic Church. He would have been one of those former Catholics who complained that Jesus is not the focus of the Catholic Church.. or the Bible is never preached. Now that he has ears to hear, he can't get over how it's ALL so biblical and all about Jesus. He learns something from every single homily. So maybe you'll get all the instruction you need just attending mass? I guess it depends on your parish.

Anyhow, welcome home. It really is good to have you back!


DISCLAIMER: The views and opinions expressed in these forums do not necessarily reflect those of Catholic Answers. For official apologetics resources please visit www.catholic.com.