Reb Zusia


#1

"One day, Reb Zusia was late for morning prayers. When asked for the reason, he responded that when he said the *Modeh Ani *prayer
(“I give thanks to You…for returning to me my soul…),
he started to think about who the “I” was and who the “You” was, and it was a long time before he could continue.”

I do love you, Reb Zusia.

reen


#2

One day, Reb Zusia grieved that he could not
please HaShem as Moses did.
But then his heart brightened.

“But if I were Moses, then HaShem wouldn’t have
his Zusia.”

reen


#3

“One day, Reb Zusia was late for morning prayers. When asked for the reason, he responded that when he said the *Modeh Ani *prayer…”


**"Modeh ani lefaneicha melech chai v’kayam shehechezarta bi nishmati bechemlah - rabbah emunatecha

**“I gratefully thank you, O living and eternal King, for You have returned my soul within me with compassion - abundant is Your faithfulness!”

“A Jew’s day begins by the recitation, immediately upon awakening, of the Modeh Ani prayer:
“I thank to You, living and eternal King…” This prayer, as well as the general obligation that immediately upon awakening a Jew be “fierce as a leopard… in his desire to fulfill the will of
his Father in Heaven,” binds a Jew to G-d throughout the day, causing him to be continuously aware that he is in G-d’s presence.”

reen


#4

The Hasidic rebbe Zusha (d.1800) used to say: “When I die and come before the heavenly court, if they ask me,’Zusha, why were you not as great as Abraham?’ I will not be afraid. I will say that I was not born with Abraham’s intellectual capabilities. And if they ask me, ‘Zusha, why were you not Moses?’ I will say that I did not have Moses’ leadership abilities. But when they ask me, ‘Zusha, why were you not Zusha?’ for that I will have no answer.”


#5

Thank you, Valke2.

Of all the saints of God, I love Zusia best.

reen


#6

Reb Elimelech of Lizhensk was Reb Zusia’s brother.

Reb Elimelech was convinced that he would be allowed to
enter the World to Come, Olam Ha-Ba.
If he was questioned as to whether he were a scholar,
he would readily admit that he had not been such.
“Did you do good deeds?”
“No,” Reb Elimelech would say, with humility and candor.

Then why should you, Reb Elimelech, be permitted to
enter Olam Ha-Ba? the Reb envisioned being asked.

“Because at least I’m honest.”

reen


#7

Reen, that is a good story of honesty, i missed it on the first look.

I have a question, and you knowing me, will understand why i ask.

Who is Reb in biblical history, and where?

How can i link his stories of great wisdom, to my own views?

I have to admit to knowing God and his son, as well as the holy spirit, but i am biblically and religion (church) behind with lac of learning.

Lana


#8

“Reb” is a title, not a name. These are stories about Jewish rabbis after the time of the Bible.

Edwin


#9

Oh, i thought this was his first name…

Thanks…

So if i ask the same, using Zusia, can i find out the same info?

Lana


#10

Zusa died in the early17h century. He is a famous hasidic rabbi.


#11

I’ve never heard of this guy before, but just the little snipets from here I can see that I will like him.

He sounds very Zen. You know how I like that.


#12

The Magid of Mezeritch was the spiritual heir of the Ba`al Shem Tov. One day someone came to him with a question: “The Talmud tells us we should bless God for the bad things that happen to us, just as we bless Him for the good. How is it possible to do such a thing?” The Magid of Mezeritch replied, “For that you must go to Reb Zusha of Anipoli.”

So the man went to visit Reb Zusha of Anipoli. When he got there, he found Reb Zusha living in great poverty, his family was beset by affliction and disease. Yet, Reb Zusha greeted him cheerfully. “The Magid of Mezeritch has sent me,” he said, “to learn from you how it is possible to bless God for the bad things that happen to us as, just as we bless Him for the good.”

Reb Zusha thought for a while. “I am sorry,” he finally replied, “I cannot answer your question - nothing bad has ever happened to me.”


#13

I pray the Modeh Ani every morning now (I have sloth like tendencies and I’m a student so its hard to get out of bed sometimes, so I wrote this prayer on my wall so I see it when I wake up)

Please, tell us more, I love stories of the Rabbis! Is there a website somewhere that might contain many of these types of tales?

thanks.


#14

I am not sure myself, but i know Reen from another forum, and she speaks of him a lot. From What i am to understand, she refers to him as her favorite saint.

I will let her know, and she can write more stories, and we can discuss them.

Look at the deep meaning behind these messages, that can bind so many in a united front.

This truly is what makes God happy. I do not know if it is her preferance or what is expected, but she writes God like this…

G-d

Aparently it is a very holy word to her, even to write!

Lana


#15

Here are two pictures of Reb Zusia that I made
to go with a children’s story about him that I have written.

Explore Maureen Gaus Explore Maureen Gaus

reen12


#16

quote: Gnosis

Please, tell us more, I love stories of the Rabbis! Is there a website somewhere that might contain many of these types of tales?

There are 215 Chassidic stories at this link.

chabad.org/library/article.asp?AID=6588

reen12

PS I like your posting name, Gnosis. :slight_smile:


#17

No matter what happened to Reb Zusia he would say
This, too, is for the good.

reen


#18

No matter what happened to Reb Zusia he would say
This, too, is for the good.

reen


#19

quote: Gnosis

…so I wrote this prayer on my wall so I see it when I wake up…

I’m sure that this makes G-d very happy, Gnosis.
And it makes me happy too.

How dear that is, to think of you putting the prayer on
your wall.

You have cheered my day. Thank you.

BTW, 40 years ago, when I was a student, I worked
it so I had a whole semester with Wednesday’s free.
It don’t get!! more “slothful” than that. :smiley:

reen12


#20

YOu might be interested in picking up a small book called “The Empty Chair” breslov.org/ordering/productdetails.php?productID=26
"A treasury of insights and advice for living joyously and spiritually today, for people of all faiths—and no faith. With timeless insight and wisdom Rebbe Nachman shows us how to fill the empty chair—the alienated self—by leaving sadness and finding hope and joy."

If you want something a little heavier, you can try Buber’s Chasidic Tales (Tales of the Chasidim?).

Here’s one website I found: jewishmag.com/19mag/zushia/zushia.htm


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