Receiving Communion on weekdays


#1

Hi,
I go to weekday Mass before work almost daily. I always get there when Mass begins. Today I got there during the Consecration and refrained from receiving Communion (I receive almost daily and confess once a month) - Being scrupulous I didn’t receive. What is the rule for daily Mass when it comes to receiving Communion? I attend St. Patrick’s Cathedral in NYC and one time a priest didn’t show up for Mass and Communion was available without Mass. Should I have gone today? thanks


#2

You may receive daily communion if not in a state of mortal sin.

Like you I probably would have felt as if I had not really satisfied the offering of the Mass by being so late but I what I think may no longer be so …

I cannot comment on the second part of your question because as far as I am concerned there is no Mass if the is no priest, never mind receiving Communion from other than an ordained priest.


#3

I think it’s just fine for you to go. Eucharist is available for people even outside of mass and only Sunday liturgy is a requirement. I would suggest that you always make a best effort to recieve the eucharist in the context of mass but if it is not possible to do so I don’t think there would be any problem with receiving.


#4

the liturgical norms are governed by the Church and the local bishop. If he allows weekday communion services in the absence of a priest, and they are conducted according to the proper norms, a Catholic may receive communion daily if he is in a state of grace. You may always receive at daily Mass, even if you are not in time for the entire Eucharistic prayer, since there is no obligation regarding daily Mass, only Sunday Mass. To be more scrupulous in practice than the Church dictates is to enter into a problem area that could benefit from spiritual direction under the guidance of a priest who knows you.


#5

[quote=marypar]Hi,
I go to weekday Mass before work almost daily. I always get there when Mass begins. Today I got there during the Consecration and refrained from receiving Communion (I receive almost daily and confess once a month) - Being scrupulous I didn’t receive. What is the rule for daily Mass when it comes to receiving Communion? I attend St. Patrick’s Cathedral in NYC and one time a priest didn’t show up for Mass and Communion was available without Mass. Should I have gone today? thanks
[/quote]

You may receive Holy Communion once a day outside of Mass. You have no obligation to attend Mass on a weekday, Only Sunday and Holy Days of Obligation. So if you arrive late for daily Mass you can receive Holy Communion, you are receiving your one time outside of attending Mass.


#6

There used to be rules on how much of Mass someone had to actually attend for it to be a Mass, but those have gone away. So there are no guidelines or rules saying when someone could NOT have Communion because they were “late” - the Church stands by the position that the person is supposed to be there for the whole Mass, and that’s all they say. So I would see no reason not to partake of the Communion as long as you are in a state of grace.


#7

[quote=marypar]Hi,
I go to weekday Mass before work almost daily. I always get there when Mass begins. Today I got there during the Consecration and refrained from receiving Communion (I receive almost daily and confess once a month) - Being scrupulous I didn’t receive. What is the rule for daily Mass when it comes to receiving Communion? I attend St. Patrick’s Cathedral in NYC and one time a priest didn’t show up for Mass and Communion was available without Mass. Should I have gone today? thanks
[/quote]

With regards to receiving Holy Communion without the Mass:

Once a year when all the priests in our area attend a five-day retreat on weekdays, the deacon presides over what we call a Communion service on those days. The reading is done by a proclaimer, the deacon reads the Gospel and gives a short homily. We then receive the Eucharist.

The same people that ordinarily gather for morning Mass are there. We are fortunate to be able to gather in this way.


#8

[quote=Dorothy]With regards to receiving Holy Communion without the Mass:

Once a year when all the priests in our area attend a five-day retreat on weekdays, the deacon presides over what we call a Communion service on those days. The reading is done by a proclaimer, the deacon reads the Gospel and gives a short homily. We then receive the Eucharist.

The same people that ordinarily gather for morning Mass are there. We are fortunate to be able to gather in this way.
[/quote]

There have been some discussions about weekday Communion servces and if they are appropriate. Since the document on the subject seems to indicate that Deacon and Lay lead Communion services should only be used when really necessary. I think this would limit them to days of obligation only.


#9

[quote=Br. Rich SFO]There have been some discussions about weekday Communion servces and if they are appropriate. Since the document on the subject seems to indicate that Deacon and Lay lead Communion services should only be used when really necessary. I think this would limit them to days of obligation only.
[/quote]

I guess it is determined by how the priest interprets “really necessary”. It would be helpful if the document were more specific. I would go along with whatever it clearly explained.

And, now that you mentioned that, I did feel a bit uncomfortable when a “liturgical assistant” took the place of the deacon when he couldn’t make it.


#10

[quote=marypar]I attend St. Patrick’s Cathedral in NYC …
[/quote]

Hi, Mary. I am at St. Patrick’s all the time. I often thought that if I was ever going to run into someone from the Catholic Answers forums, I would run into them there. Maybe we could get some super secret pins or some other sign that would distinguish us from the rest? Either that or we could just walk into the church carrying Mr. Keating’s newsletter. :slight_smile:


#11

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