Receiving the Eucharist forgives venial sins?


#1

Read about this online. Is it plenary?


#2

No, it’s not plenary. At a regular Mass, there are two opportunities to be forgiven of venial sin - the Penitential Rite (if the Confetior is used - Form A) and Communion.


#3

Venial sins can be forgiven in many ways…


#4

Catechism:

1436 Eucharist and Penance. Daily conversion and penance find their source and nourishment in the Eucharist, for in it is made present the sacrifice of Christ which has reconciled us with God. Through the Eucharist those who live from the life of Christ are fed and strengthened. "It is a remedy to free us from our daily faults and to preserve us from mortal sins."35

1394 As bodily nourishment restores lost strength, so the Eucharist strengthens our charity, which tends to be weakened in daily life; and this living charity wipes away venial sins.231

1437 Reading Sacred Scripture, praying the Liturgy of the Hours and the Our Father - every sincere act of worship or devotion revives the spirit of conversion and repentance within us and contributes to the forgiveness of our sins.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#V

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful


#5

[quote="Bookcat, post:4, topic:297252"]
Catechism:

1436 Eucharist and Penance. Daily conversion and penance find their source and nourishment in the Eucharist, for in it is made present the sacrifice of Christ which has reconciled us with God. Through the Eucharist those who live from the life of Christ are fed and strengthened. "It is a remedy to free us from our daily faults and to preserve us from mortal sins."35

1394 As bodily nourishment restores lost strength, so the Eucharist strengthens our charity, which tends to be weakened in daily life; and this living charity wipes away venial sins.231

1437 Reading Sacred Scripture, praying the Liturgy of the Hours and the Our Father - every sincere act of worship or devotion revives the spirit of conversion and repentance within us and contributes to the forgiveness of our sins.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c2a4.htm#V

1458 Without being strictly necessary, confession of everyday faults (venial sins) is nevertheless strongly recommended by the Church.59 Indeed the regular confession of our venial sins helps us form our conscience, fight against evil tendencies, let ourselves be healed by Christ and progress in the life of the Spirit. By receiving more frequently through this sacrament the gift of the Father's mercy, we are spurred to be merciful as he is merciful

[/quote]

Thank you so much for post these lessons from the Catechism. Peace, Carlan


#6

All sins are forgiven.


#7

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:6, topic:297252"]
All sins are forgiven.

[/quote]

As the Scholastics would say --let us distinguish.

First off "all sins" could be taken in the wrong sense as to mean any sin not just the venial sins in question. (mortal sins are to be confessed in confession....) (I know your directly referring to the question there ..but it seemed good to note such)

Secondly -- I would not put it that way even in terms of venial sins -- for example lets say I am not sorry for such and such venial sin....and thus hold on to it.... I am not contrite for it.....hence I do not think forgiveness is going to yet happen for that sin....(now if am sorry for it --then yes it can be forgiven at Holy Communion --if not even before).

But can venial sins be forgiven in Holy Communion? --yes (see CCC quotes above)


#8

Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi

Our prayers for receiving Communion say that all sins may be forgiven by receiving the Eucharist. Christ cannot be defeated by sin, anyone who receives Christ and willingly accepts Christ makes Christ triumph over sin within oneself.

“May the partaking of your Holy Mysteries be unto me not for judgement or condemnation, but for the healing of soul and body.”

And the last line of the prayer, “I have sinned without number, forgive me O Lord!”

When the priest receives he prays, “The precious and most holy Body of our Lord and God and Savior, Jesus Christ, is given to me [name], a priest, for the forgiveness of my sins and for life everlasting. Amen”

The priest prays a similar prayer when receiving the Precious Blood, and further adds, “This has touched my lips and shall remove my wickedness and purge my sins.”


#9

[quote="Corki, post:2, topic:297252"]
No, it's not plenary. At a regular Mass, there are two opportunities to be forgiven of venial sin - the Penitential Rite (if the Confetior is used - Form A) and Communion.

[/quote]

Can you provide citation as to it only being Form A that can provide forgiveness of venial sins. My understanding is that it can be any of the forms and the sprinkling with holy water option that remit venial sin.

Also, my understanding has always been that when we Cross ourselves with Holy Water upon entering, that too remits venial sins. Also, the Angus Dei and the "Lord I am not worthy to receive you" prayer remits venial sin.


#10

Yes – such prayers from Eastern Catholic Liturgies are yes asking for the forgiveness of our venial sins.

We yes should pray for the forgiveness of the various venial sins that we have committed. And yes they can be wiped away during the Eucharist…

and I note still what I noted above.



#11

A further note regarding mortal sin (again for the sake of readers...not that such was the subject of the thread or what anyone here was referring to)

As they say in the Catholic East: Holy things for the Holy!

1385 To respond to this invitation we must prepare ourselves for so great and so holy a moment. St. Paul urges us to examine our conscience: "Whoever, therefore, eats the bread or drinks the cup of the Lord in an unworthy manner will be guilty of profaning the body and blood of the Lord. Let a man examine himself, and so eat of the bread and drink of the cup. For any one who eats and drinks without discerning the body eats and drinks judgment upon himself."218 Anyone conscious of a grave sin must receive the sacrament of Reconciliation before coming to communion.

1415 Anyone who desires to receive Christ in Eucharistic communion must be in the state of grace. Anyone aware of having sinned mortally must not receive communion without having received absolution in the sacrament of penance.

scborromeo.org/ccc/p2s2c1a3.htm#VI


#12

Comparison.

CCEO (canonical Eastern Catholics)

Canon 718
In the sacrament of penance, the Christian faithful who committed sins after baptism, internally led by the Holy Spirit, turn back to God, moved by the pain of sin, intent on entering a new life through the ministry of the priest, having themselves made a confession and accepted an appropriate penance, obtain forgiveness from God and at the same time are reconciled with the Church which they injured by sinning; by this sacrament they are brought to a greater fostering of the Christian life and are thus disposed for receiving the Divine Eucharist.

Canon 719
Anyone who is aware of serious sin is to receive the sacrament of penance as soon as possible; it is strongly recommended to all the Christian faithful that they receive this sacrament frequently especially during the times of fasts and penance observed in their own Church sui iuris.

Canon 720

  1. Individual and integral confession and absolution constitute the ordinary way by which the Christian faithful who is aware of a serious sin is reconciled with God and the Church; only physical or moral impossibility excuses one from confession of this type, in which case reconciliation can take place in other ways.

CIC (canonical Latin Catholics)

Can. 959 In the sacrament of penance the faithful who confess their sins to a legitimate minister, are sorry for them, and intend to reform themselves obtain from God through the absolution imparted by the same minister forgiveness for the sins they have committed after baptism and, at the same, time are reconciled with the Church which they have wounded by sinning.

Can. 988 §1. A member of the Christian faithful is obliged to confess in kind and number all grave sins committed after baptism and not yet remitted directly through the keys of the Church nor acknowledged in individual confession, of which the person has knowledge after diligent examination of conscience.
§2. It is recommended to the Christian faithful that they also confess venial sins.

Can. 960 Individual and integral confession and absolution constitute the only ordinary means by which a member of the faithful conscious of grave sin is reconciled with God and the Church. Only physical or moral impossibility excuses from confession of this type; in such a case reconciliation can be obtained by other means.


#13

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:6, topic:297252"]
All sins are forgiven.

[/quote]

This is theologically correct BUT we have to introduce the notion of contrition of the heart/sorrow for sins.

Contrition/Sorrow for one's sins is ALWAYS required to continue with any absolution of sins. From objective reason, we know that there is two forms of contrition for wrongdoing/sins.

1) Imperfect Contrition: This stems from the sorrow we have from the possible punishment that we would incure from unforgiven wrongdoing/sins.

2) Perfect Contrition: This stems from the sorrow we have from the possibility of disappointing someone we love, like God, from our wrongdoing/sins.

Because of the fact that we are imperfect beings, it is hard for us to know exactly if our contrition is because of fear of eternal punishment or fear of letting Jesus down.
This is one of the reasons why we have the Sacrament of Confession. It bridges this gap of uncertainty that we have and brings us to a higher state of grace in the process (remember all Sacraments result in an increase of grace).

My suggestion is to always be conservative in your examination of conscience before receiving the Eucharist, as maintain a high sense of reverence for Most Blessed Sacrament.


#14

I’ve come to realize that it is not sorrow for sins that God asks from us, but rather repentance. Repentance isn’t the emotion of sorrow, but rather the resolve to change your life in accordance with God.


#15

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:8, topic:297252"]
Lex Orandi, Lex Credendi

Our prayers for receiving Communion say that all sins may be forgiven by receiving the Eucharist. Christ cannot be defeated by sin, anyone who receives Christ and willingly accepts Christ makes Christ triumph over sin within oneself.

"May the partaking of your Holy Mysteries be unto me not for judgement or condemnation, but for the healing of soul and body."

And the last line of the prayer, "I have sinned without number, forgive me O Lord!"

When the priest receives he prays, "The precious and most holy Body of our Lord and God and Savior, Jesus Christ, is given to me [name], a priest, for the forgiveness of my sins and for life everlasting. Amen"

The priest prays a similar prayer when receiving the Precious Blood, and further adds, "This has touched my lips and shall remove my wickedness and purge my sins."

[/quote]

But then that would mean if I am really, really, really sorry for an unconfessed mortal sin that is on my soul, I can receive communion. Doesn't that undermine the admonition of not receiving while not in a state of grace?


#16

Sorrow helps to bring about the desire to repent.


#17

[quote="ConstantineTG, post:6, topic:297252"]
All sins are forgiven.

[/quote]

Not mortal sins. We must repent for these to be forgiven, the Lord cannot "force" us to be in a relationship with Him.

If we commit mortal sin and do not repent, we have broken that relationship. The Lord is willing to forgive, but if we did not repent and, in disobedience, partake of the Holy Eucharist in a state of mortal sin, then we are also - by the words of St. Paul - guilty of sinning against the Body and Blood of Christ.


#18

Holy Church teaches that repentance includes several steps. Sorrow for sins is integral part of repentance. While it is very wise not to be deeply disturbed when we fall, it is natural to feel sorrow for having offended our Beloved, if we repent.

1450 “Penance requires . . . the sinner to endure all things willingly, be contrite of heart, confess with the lips, and practice complete humility and fruitful satisfaction.”

1451 Among the penitent’s acts contrition occupies first place. Contrition is “sorrow of the soul and detestation for the sin committed, together with the resolution not to sin again.”

We have seen our Pastor experience this beforehand:

At that moment the Lord turned and looked at Peter. …] And Peter left the courtyard, crying bitterly.


#19

[quote="R_C, post:18, topic:297252"]
Holy Church teaches that repentance includes several steps. Sorrow for sins is integral part of repentance. While it is very wise not to be deeply disturbed when we fall, it is natural to feel sorrow for having offended our Beloved, if we repent.

We have seen our Pastor experience this beforehand:

[/quote]

Sorrow is not an integral part. Remorse without reform is hollow.


#20

[quote="R_C, post:17, topic:297252"]
Not mortal sins. We must repent for these to be forgiven, the Lord cannot "force" us to be in a relationship with Him.

If we commit mortal sin and do not repent, we have broken that relationship. The Lord is willing to forgive, but if we did not repent and, in disobedience, partake of the Holy Eucharist in a state of mortal sin, then we are also - by the words of St. Paul - guilty of sinning against the Body and Blood of Christ.

[/quote]

This is where Sacramental Theology of East and West diverge. Yes, the Eucharist does forgive all sins. It is in Scripture, "This is my blood of the covenant, which is poured out for many for the forgiveness of sins." Jesus didn't say just venial sins, he said for the forgiveness of sins, unqualified. We can easily assume it is all sins.

It is not merely having sin that makes us unworthy of the Body and Blood of Christ. When are we without sin anyway? It is our state of mind and state of our heart. Do we accept Christ despite being a sinner? Or are we more in love with our sin than Christ? But the issue really is not whether we have sin or not but what do we want? Do we want Christ to come into our lives and defeat our sins? If not, then we do sin in receiving the Eucharist.


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