Record-tying Oklahoma earthquake felt as far away as Arizona


#1

sfgate.com/news/texas/article/Earthquake-shakes-swath-of-Midwest-from-Missouri-9201503.php


#2

This is an interesting article.


#3

Felt it this morning in KC.


#4

Let’s hope it doesn’t wake up the New Madrid fault :eek:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Madrid_Seismic_Zone


#5

Interesting. Thank you.
Hope it is shutting down…


#6

A sizable New Madrid earthquake would be bad news. However, I don’t think the Oklahoma quakes are connected via any faults. Here is a regional map of earthquakes during the past two weeks. All of the quakes are in Oklahoma or Kansas, with none in Missouri, Arkansas or other states to the east.

The US Geological Survey is suggesting that the Oklahoma earthquakes may be due to wastewater being injected into deep wells. Apparently the petroleum industry in Oklahoma uses this technique because it is economical. However, the seismic consequences are beginning to be obvious.

Using deep injection wells to store water, whether as waste or for later consumption, may not be advisable in an area at risk for earthquakes.


#7

Praying it doesn’t lead to a bigger one…


#8

Wife is pretty sure it’s what woke her up this morning in Wisconsin.


#9

Oklahoma orders shutdown of 35 wells after earthquake

money.cnn.com/2016/09/03/news/economy/oklahoma-earthquake-fracking-oil/

The headline refers to deep injection wells, not oil wells. Deep injection wells pump water into the ground. This is a common way to get rid of the wastewater which is a by-product of fracking.

According to the US Geological Survey, deep injection wells have led to a marked increase in earthquakes in the central US

Locations across the central and eastern United States (CEUS) have been experiencing a rapid increase in the number of induced earthquakes over the past 7 years. Since 2009 rates in some areas, such as Oklahoma, have increased by more than an order of magnitude. Scientific studies have linked the majority of this increased activity to wastewater injection in deep disposal wells in several locations.

earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/eventpage/us10006jxs#executive


#10

I know the Song
“Okie from Muskoki”
by Willie Nelson.
I hope and pray that all will settle down
and recover!!


#11

I think you meant Merle Haggard.


#12

Muskogee :grinning:

My husband is always correcting me when I sing songs. I always think they are saying something just a little different than what they are. :joy:


#13

I don’t understand why they just don’t ban fracking. Obviously it causes earthquakes and one of these days it is bound to cause a big one which will kill many people and destroy a lot of property. Why don’t we wake up and ban fracking before that happens? I know why, it’s because of the greed for oil.


#14

Hmm… I hope you will forgive me, because I am afraid I am about to come across as an insufferable hairsplitter (or worse.) :o

However, the earthquakes are not caused by fracking, but by how oil companies have been disposing of their wastewater. This wastewater is more abundant due to fracking, but many non-fracked oil wells produce wastewater as well. Processing this wastewater so that it is environmentally-friendly is expensive. Oil companies have being getting rid of it by injecting deep underground. By “deep” I mean injecting the water more than a mile underground.

earthquake.usgs.gov/research/induced/myths.php

I think the idea was that the wastewater, properly situated to avoid aquifers, wouldn’t disturb anything. Unfortunately, the pressure of this new underground body of water sometimes sets off earthquakes.

Your larger point, that this problem is due to “greed,” is more or less right. Oil companies have been disposing of their wastewater in the cheapest way they could get away with. Unfortunately for them, I think the government will become more strict in granting approval for deep injection wells.


#15

Well, think about it, we have been steadily pumping oil out of the ground for decades, more cars on the road now that ever, oil is not some unlimited resource, eventually it will run out, when it starts getting low, the oil companies start having to do all kinds of riskier, more expensive methods to get at it.

When something like this sets off the new madrid fault and destroys half the country, I bet they will ban fracking, but not until then. LOL

Greed is pretty much running the planet, God wont allow that to go on forever though.


#16

NPR:

After one of the strongest earthquakes ever to hit Oklahoma struck Saturday, state regulators ordered oil and gas companies to shut down all their wastewater disposal wells in a 725-square-mile area around the site of the quake’s epicenter near Pawnee.
The seismic activity immediately raised suspicions that it was linked to injection wells that oil and gas companies use as part of fracking and other operations. The 5.6-magnitude earthquake was felt in five states; it followed a string of smaller temblors that hit the region in Oklahoma in the past week.
As Joe Wertz of StateImpact Oklahoma reports for our Newscast unit:
"The U.S. Geological Survey says the quake resembles ones scientists have linked to the wells, which the energy industry fills with fluid from oil and gas production — a small amount of which is from fracking.
“Dave Denny lives near the epicenter. The quake damaged the foundation of his trailer home and severed his sewer line.
" ‘It’s a bad thing to wake up to, let me put it that way,’ Denny says. ‘Luckily, everybody is alright and all this can be repaired.’”
“Researchers say disposal wells are likely the reason Oklahoma is now the most seismically active state in the country.”

The Oklahoma Corporation Commission says the moratorium area includes 211 square miles of Osage County, which is in the Environmental Protection Agency’s jurisdiction. The EPA will determine whether wells in that area should be shut down, the agency says.


#17

I was at DFW airport when it happened. I taught it was construction going on. It wasn’t until someone told me, did you feel the earthquake that it hit me.


#18

Oklahoma earthquake and oil drilling: What we know


#19

Removing oil from underground, one supposes, could cause subsidence and resultant earthquakes. But if it is replaced with wastewater, it seems to me it could actually ameliorate the result.

One is put to mind of the vast subterranean caverns underlying Joplin, Mo, created in the lead-mining days. Fortunately, they filled with ground water, which at least provides some support to the overlying rock.


#20

Several months ago in reading about fracking, I read that these earthquakes could
be releasing the pressure and preventing larger devastating ones.


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