Reporting use of Glass Chalice

Glass Chalices were used at mass at my collage. Since it is a Jesuit institution I wrote a letter to the local Jesuit Province. Is there anything else I should do in the meantime?

To whom it may concern,

When I attended Sunday mass at the {Removed} I saw glass chalices being used. I believe this to be a liturgical abuse. In the document by Congregation for Divine Worship and the Discipline of the Sacraments, Redemptionis Sacramentum:
“…[117.] Sacred vessels for containing the Body and Blood of the Lord must be made in strict conformity with the norms of tradition and of the liturgical books.[205]The Bishops’ Conferences have the faculty to decide whether it is appropriate, once their decisions have been given the recognitio by the Apostolic See, for sacred vessels to be made of other solid materials as well. It is strictly required, however, that such materials be truly noble in the common estimation within a given region,[206]so that honour will be given to the Lord by their use, and all risk of diminishing the doctrine of the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharistic species in the eyes of the faithful will be avoided. Reprobated, therefore, is any practice of using for the celebration of Mass common vessels, or others lacking in quality, or devoid of all artistic merit or which are mere containers, as also other vessels made from glass, earthenware, clay, or other materials that break easily. This norm is to be applied even as regards metals and other materials that easily rust or deteriorate.[207]…”

Sincerely,

The appropriate authority to address your concerns is the bishop of the diocese where this is taking place.

I believe that one should go through the chain of command. First you should bring your concerns to the campus chaplain. If you are not satisfied with his response then take it to the bishop of that diocese.

With all do respect - isn’t there a soup kitchen or shelter that would better be served by your time than writing letters like that? I mean I understand its a big concern for many - but we have bigger issues to deal with as Christ’s hands and feet on earth.

Do it in writing to create a paper trail. It will help.

With all due respect, should you not be volunteering at a soup kitchen or shelter instead of spending time criticizing someone else for asking a perfectly legitimate question?

See John 12:5-6

[edited] Holy Communion is to be respected. The Protestants believe it is only a symbol. Catholics believe the bread and wine become the physical presence of the Body and Blood of Our Lord and Savior Christ! Proper respect and reverence is required!

“A thousand years of enjoying human glory is not worth even an hour spent sweetly communicating with Jesus in the Blessed Sacrament.” St. Padre Pio

" A thousand good deeds is not equal to one good Mass" A quote from a Saint that I read from somewhere. If someone could tell me who it is I would be thankful.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Superior_General_of_the_Society_of_Jesus#Powers

The Superior General is invested with ordinary power over the members of the Society, similar to the power given to a bishop over the people of a diocese. Superiors General submit themselves to the direct authority of and service to the Pope, not local ordinaries.

Pax Christi,

I just wanted to thank your for doing your duty as a lay Catholic, It is very discouraging to see so many Catholics not caring about Church Teaching, You made my day by standing up for the Church.

The Eucharist does not become the physical presence. Yes, it is the real substantial presence - body, blood, soul and divinity - but it is a sacramental presence, not a physical one. There is a difference. But your point about respect and reverence is well noted…however I don’t think Jesus is offended over His Blood in glass chalices, but then again it’s in the documents so I guess we have to follow it. I would take it to those in charge at the school first and express your concerns. But using glass chalices has nothing to do with Protestant beliefs.

Explain all the Eucharistic Miracles that have happened throughout the centuries?

The local bishop still has pastoral care over the place (canon 813)

The wikipedia article only explains that the Superior General of the SJ himself is not a subject of the local ordinary where he resides, but answers directly to the pope.

PS
The above was a little too brief. The point I’m trying to make is that the local bishop still has jurisdiction over the Masses being said on campus. Remember that the people attending those Masses (students, faculty, staff, etc) are all subject to the pastoral care of the local bishop, so by addressing your concerns to him, you would be addressing a competent authority. There are all kinds of canonical issues, beginning with questions (is it a diocesan parish? was the chaplain appointed by the bishop? etc, etc) but the bottom line is that the local bishop is competent to deal with this matter.

I will submit to someone else’s explanation who has the authority to speak on this matter. But it is my understanding that the Eucharistic Miracles occured to prove that the Sacred Host and the Precious Blood are truly the Real Presence of Christ, Body Blood, Soul and Divinity. Christ’s presence in the Eucharist is not a physical presence. The Eucharistic Miracles that have turned into human heart tissue and real blood are a physical presence. But we do not eat the physical presence of flesh and blood. We are not cannibals. We eat the sacramental presence of Jesus that is a Real Substantial Presence under the appearance of bread and wine, food that is meant to be eaten.

“Materials for sacred vessels(see # 329): In the dioceses of the USA, sacred vessels may also be made from other solid materials that, according to the common estimation in each region, are precious, for example ebony or other hard woods, provided that such materials are suitable for sacred use and do not break easily. This applies to all vessels which hold the host such as the paten, the ciborium, the pyx, the monstrance, and other things of this kind.
In the Archdiocese of Portland, vessels acquired prior to this directive may be used, even if they are glass or crystal

from archdpdx.org/liturgy/girm.html

If your local ordinary has decided that non-conforming vessels do not have to be replaced immediately with conforming vessels, then you may get nowhere. Call the chancery office (or pastoral center, whatever they call it in your diocese) and ask to talk with someone in the office for worship (or liturgy, or whatever they call it). I think this will give you an idea of whether writing a letter is going to serve any good purpose. (If you still want to pursue it, you can instead send a complaint about the policy of the diocese to someone higher up in the Church.)

Ohhhhhhhhhhhhhh,I feel the same too

[edited]

Seriously, if this is of concern to the OP, go up the chain of command.

Malkin,

JoannM was quite correct. Being "Physically’ present means that the physical properties ( mass, color, taste, chemical composition) are present. The Church referres to those as “Accidents”.

The Accidents of Bread and Wine remain, it looks like bread, it tastes like bread, it weights the same as a wafer of bread.

Yes, there are certainly miracles where the physical properties of blood, or heart tissue are demostrated, but even then, it is not Christ being ‘physically present’. Christ in the Eucharist is the complete Body, Blood, Soul and Divinity. For the Eucharist to be physically present, it would mean that the full Body of Christ is present. We would, ala St. Thomas, be able to examine the nail marks in His Hands, and place our own hand in the spear mark in His side.

We cannot do that with the Eucharist, even the Eucharistic miracles. And that is why we say that the Eucharist is not the physical presence of Christ, but the Substantial presence.

Here is the revelent section from Redepemptionis Sacramentum:

  1. Sacred Vessels
    [117.] Sacred vessels for containing the Body and Blood of the Lord must be made in strict conformity with the norms of tradition and of the liturgical books.205 The Bishops’ Conferences have the faculty to decide whether it is appropriate, once their decisions have been given the recognitio by the Apostolic See, for sacred vessels to be made of other solid materials as well. It is strictly required, however, that such materials be truly noble in the common estimation within a given region,206 so that honor will be given to the Lord by their use, and all risk of diminishing the doctrine of the Real Presence of Christ in the Eucharistic species in the eyes of the faithful will be avoided. Reprobated, therefore, is any practice of using for the celebration of Mass common vessels, or others lacking in quality, or devoid of all artistic merit or which are mere containers, as also other vessels made from glass, earthenware, clay, or other materials that break easily. This norm is to be applied even as regards metals and other materials that easily rust or deteriorate.207

The word reprobated is perhaps some of the strongest language used in this document and it shows up particularly in this section.

Thus, if something is reprobated, it should not be done. Your bishop needs to know that this activity is happening in his diocese.

If your bishop explicitly permits it on the internet posting the GIRM for his diocese, though, expect to go higher with the complaint, unless you know the glassware to have been obtained more recently than he has chosen to allow. The OP is hardly likely to get anywhere with complaining to a bishop about what the bishop has openly chosen to permit, even if the bishop were wrong.

By the way, Benedictgal, you would probably know this: What is to be done with vessels previously used as for Mass that do not meet liturgical standards? What is permissible, and what is ideal? Can such a vessel be returned to secular use, like a table used for Mass that wasn’t a dedicated altar? If not, can the vessels be thrown out? How? Is it necessary to break glass vessels, melt the glass down, or anything like that? I have heard that a bag may be made of a purificator ready to be retired, and the vessel might be buried in the bag in a place on church grounds where it will not be disturbed, so that its identity might be clear even if it were to be unearthed, but I have no idea whether that is right or not. I can’t find it on the internet.

To your first point, I checked the link you provided and found some inconsistencies. The one that really stuck out at me was:

  1. Ministers may assist with purifying and washing the communion vessels as needed, as well as consuming the remaining precious blood. (See Norms for the Distribution and Reception of Holy Communion Under Both Kinds in the Dioceses of the United States #51-55)

I am hoping that what is posted in the website is simply a matter of being outdated, as Pope Benedict XVI did away with this indult for the United States back in 2005 shortly after he took office.

Regarding your second question, I would break the glass “chalices” and bury the fragments. There is no need to store them, lest some well-intentioned, but, misguided person might assume that they can be used for the Mass and then the problem starts all over again. :shrug:

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