Researching Pornography and a Hypothesis


#1

I would like to do some research on pornography, not for a formal project or work, but for personal knowledge that will equip me for discussions with persons who have liberal opinions on matters of sexual ethics, especially among those who are non-Catholics.

I believe that such persons will be more open to the truth about human sexuality and its authentic expression if they are first presented with documented, objective, scientific and statistical data about the ruinous effects of pornography on society.

However, I wanted to inquire from any CAF members who are already fairly knowledgeable about pornography from a sociological perspective, for recommended educational sites and studies.

I have hesitated to Google things yet, because first I am wary of what the search results will display; it's not that I cannot resist pornographic content, by the grace of God I can as my return to the Church and the Sacraments produced the good fruit of pornography not being a temptation for me and I recoil at obscene material, but it's that I simply do not want to see anything inadvertently because pornographic images permanently stamp themselves onto the mind. I have enough unwanted memories due to poor and sinful selections of movies, books, music, etc in my past that grieve me and spontaneous images that come to me; I do not need anymore. The other reason is that I have scruples.

So ... that brings me to my next point:

Any recommendations on how to articulate my inquiries on the Google search bar so as to generate good, informational sites?

The four topics that I am particularly interested in is:

  • The pyschological and neurochemical changes produced by both initial exposure and continued, habitual exposure to pornography
  • The relationship between the viewing of pornography and sexual abuse
  • The relationship between the viewing of pornography and marital health
  • The relationship between adult pornography, child, pornography, and pornographic bestiality ( is that what it is called?)

I would like to explain that last topic interest:

I have a hypothesis: With the exception of cases involving pedophiles -- who have an exclusive or deep-seated attraction to pre-pubescent children -- I suspect that most persons who presently, or have in the past, willingly requested, obtained, or viewed child pornography, have done so *after *consenting to the same for adult pornography.

In other words, I am hypothesizing that adult pornography is a stepping stone for child pornography; this is not to be construed as me saying that all persons who view adult pornography will move onto viewing child pornography, but rather, that almost everyone who views child pornography begin by watching adult pornography.

I hypothesize the same as true of the viewing of pornographic content that involves animals.

I think pornography induces an expansion of sexual fantasies and disordered sexual ingenuity; it may begin with viewing naked bodies to satisfy one's lust, then perhaps the viewing of a solitary act of masturbation or natural sex between a man and a woman, then unnatural sexual performances between a man and woman (an alternative to coitus), then a sexual act involving 3 or more persons, homosexual acts, and so forth.

In short, I think it progresses from bad to worse -- to increasingly perverse content as the brain exhausts its satisfaction with one category of content, it desires something "different", "new" and "exciting", and becomes desensitized to boundries.

Finally, is there any other type of pornography than the three listed above that I am not aware of?


#2

Pornography is a large, global product, with a high dollar value.

Start here:

ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3050060/

Peace,
Ed


#3

you could try doing a google scholar search but that could possibly even give you some not-so-great results…

Try looking for Catholic or Christian articles that have this kind of information in them. You could also go to the library and look at any scientific research done on the topics. Those shouldn’t have any pornographic images in them.

God Bless! :slight_smile:


#4

I would not do that research at all. Too many risks. You will be reading, and looking, at porn for very long, and remember that Satan is out there seeking souls. I did once meet good old Satan and was fooled to commit a sin. So my advice is that you find another field to dig in. I think we all know as much as we need to know about porn, it is wrong, it is filthy, it is so far from a “normal” sexlife as anything can be, and the porn industry is around only for one thing, money. Somehow though I think you will do it anyway, so please be careful, and keep a Crusifix on table so that you can see it all the time.

BTW, who will benefit and what from that research? We know porn is wrong, so…


#5

Because of how pornified our culture is, and the Supreme Court’s defense of pornography as a legal form of viewable entertainment, I want to know concrete information about its impact on society, and would like to memorize some statistics, so that I am prepared to address certain foreseeable objections people might raise against our position, which is not only one of opposition to pornography, but in favor its censorship as well – and the latter will be sure to rile up the liberally, sexually minded.

*" Why should pornography by illegal? It would be a victimless crime * ", for example, is on they could say.

If I contradict them, they most likely will not take me for my word and will want me to support my position with evidence.


#6

I suggest going to a large library and going to their periodicals section. Tell them what you are looking for. They should have a number of professional journals that you would find useful. The same with a large college or university. I've gone to my local university, even though I am not a student, to browse their specialist publications. One more alternative is purchasing articles online. For example:

mayoclinicproceedings.org/article/S0025-6196%2811%2961074-4/fulltext

Reputable medical sources such as the Mayo Clinic provide solid documentation.

Peace,
Ed


#7

Here is one more source.

sciencedaily.com/releases/2012/10/121019102802.htm

Be careful to check your references between even professional journals. There is clear evidence of bias in some cases and the public, through the non-professional, mainstream media, are being given the impression that porn is not so bad.

Peace,
Ed


#8

Here is an example of a professional journal that looks helpful. If your library does not have it, you can request an interlibrary loan. This means another library that has it will be contacted and a copy of the journal will be sent to your library and made available to you.

tandfonline.com/toc/usac20/current#.UfFU9W2cvGg

Peace,
Ed


#9

Your hypothesis sounds correct to me. You might also be interested to know that online pornography constantly markets "barely legal" and "young" as major selling points. Most porn sites are only over 18, so it's not like child pornography is (apparently) very prevalent. But the message seems to be "if we could get younger models, we would, it's just that it's illegal."

That message in itself would seem to confirm your hypothesis.

Oh, and I would recommend Google Scholar as well. I don't think many of the links there would include images at all.


#10

Thank you very much Ed for your recommendations. Incidentally, I will be starting school in August at a good orthdox Catholic college (one that is on the Cardinal Newman Society’s list of recommended schools) and one of the advantages of being a student is having access to a variety of online databases provided for by the school library. I will also have the added security of blocked inappropriate sites in the event that any web link I click on directs me to a pornographic site. I agree with you to be attentive to bias.

A little anecdote: A few weeks ago I was reading through a comment thread on Facebook where a female atheist and a man (I could not tell if he was an atheist as well) were discussing and disagreeing about the addictive nature of pornography. She rejected the term ‘pornography addiction’, saying that the social sciences have not sufficiently demonstrated that sexual addictions exist, and she said that the term itself is not a norm in psychology. He asked her rhetorically if she does not know anyone who struggles with pornography, in reply to which she said yes “struggles” in the sense of having being told that sex is evil and carrying guilty for the pornography they like.

I have followed her other threads before but I was truly shocked that she would be skeptical of the existence of pornography addiction, in the same way that we would be shocked if someone question drug addiction.


#11

I will share with you something very disturbing that I heard on an audio talk that I listened to on Youtube, given by a Catholic, on the moral degeneration of society.

I sickened me so much that I cried when I heard it, I could not believe how depraved some people are.

I will paraphrase but I know it is almost identical to what he said, I just do not have the video playing right now to transcribe his exact words. He said that the worldwide child pornography industry is such that a person can negotiate with a pornographer in another country to request customized pornography, for example a blonde haired, blue eyed four-year old girl doing this or that.


#12

[quote="Ana_v, post:11, topic:334044"]
I will share with you something very disturbing that I heard on an audio talk that I listened to on Youtube, given by a Catholic, on the moral degeneration of society.

I sickened me so much that I cried when I heard it, I could not believe how depraved some people are.

I will paraphrase but I know it is almost identical to what he said, I just do not have the video playing right now to transcribe his exact words. He said that the worldwide child pornography industry is such that a person can negotiate with a pornographer in another country to request customized pornography, for example a blonde haired, blue eyed four-year old girl doing this or that.

[/quote]

That is sickening. :mad:

By the way, I remembered another resource you might look into. It's a book called "In the Shadows of the Net", by Patrick Carnes. Carnes is an expert on sexual addiction, and he writes about how a person's "attraction template" can change by their viewing pornography.


#13

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