Resurrection


#1

I was told by a priest that the word in greek that it is translated into English as "resurrection" it appears in the Gospels once: It is in the Parable of the prodigal son when the father says: my son was dead and now is risen. Is it that true? What are the greek words used in the texts that we are used to read as: The Resurrection of Lazarus; the daughter of Jairus, etc.

Thank you so much!


#2

I don't know about that but the word anastasis translates from the Greek litraraly meaning ' to stand up, i.e. a resurection or a rising up.


#3

I don't know why the priest would say that. When I do a search on the Greek text, it shows the word "anastasis" being used 42 times. As ivdaeorum noted, resurrection or rising up are meanings applied to the word "anastasis".

*Matthew 27:53 **uses a different word - "egersis" - for resurrection. It is used only once in the Bible.
*(Mt. 27:53 and coming out of the tombs after his resurrection they went into the holy city and appeared to many. )

In Philippians 3:11, the Greek word "exanastasis" is used. This word also appears only once in the Bible - but it has the root of anastasis.

*(Phil 3:11 that if possible I may attain the resurrection from the dead.) *


#4

In the Prodigal Son parable, the word "anazao" is used twice. Those are the only 2 times the Greek NT uses that word.

Luke 15:24 15:24 "for this my son was dead, and is alive again;"
Luke 15:32 " for this your brother was dead, and is alive;"

The Strong Concordance defines "anazao" as - "live again", "revive"


#5

[quote="Nita, post:4, topic:325150"]
In the Prodigal Son parable, the word "anazao" is used twice. Those are the only 2 times the Greek NT uses that word.

Luke 15:24 15:24 "for this my son was dead, and is alive again;"
Luke 15:32 " for this your brother was dead, and is alive;"

The Strong Concordance defines "anazao" as - "live again", "revive"

[/quote]

In v. 24, the word is ἀνέζησεν (anezēsen), as you've mentioned.

Actually though, in v. 32, it depends on the Greek manuscript that you're looking at. Some have ἔζησεν, others ἀνέζησε, still others ἀνέζησεν.

The verbs based on ἀναζάω convey the meaning of "alive again", whereas the ones based on ζάω simply convey the meaning "alive".

I believe there's an additional use of ἀναζάω in the NT, in Romans 7:9 ("when the law came with its ban, the sense of sin found new life")


#6

[quote="Gorgias, post:5, topic:325150"]
In v. 24, the word is ἀνέζησεν (anezēsen), as you've mentioned.

Actually though, in v. 32, it depends on the Greek manuscript that you're looking at. Some have ἔζησεν, others ἀνέζησε, still others ἀνέζησεν.

The verbs based on ἀναζάω convey the meaning of "alive again", whereas the ones based on ζάω simply convey the meaning "alive".

I believe there's an additional use of ἀναζάω in the NT, in Romans 7:9 ("when the law came with its ban, the sense of sin found new life")

[/quote]

Thanks for pointing out the variation on v. 32. After reading your post I checked the verse on my Bible software, and it has ἔζησεν for verse 32. Also, thanks for the info on the meaning when the word has the prefix ἀνα.
I used the Strong Concordance for my response (and used their transliteration).

I have a question about transliteration. When you transliterate do you do each letter individually? I've seen the online charts that give the equivalent English letters, but when I would do it letter for letter, it often didn't agree with how the word was transliterated elsewhere. Also, if there were options, I didn't know which English letter to use. Is there some sort of online dictionary that gives the transliteration from one language to another like the online translation sites give translations? Thanks for any help.
I have no knowledge of Greek. :o


#7

[quote="Nita, post:6, topic:325150"]
I used the Strong Concordance for my response (and used their transliteration).

[/quote]

Makes sense -- and, they would have used the canonical form (first person singular present).

I have a question about transliteration. When you transliterate do you do each letter individually? I've seen the online charts that give the equivalent English letters, but when I would do it letter for letter, it often didn't agree with how the word was transliterated elsewhere.

Hmm. Are you talking the difference between the canonical forms and each form as found in the text itself? (That is, for example, the difference between "I have" and "they had"?)

Or, perhaps, are you talking about the effects of the diacritics?


#8

[quote="Gorgias, post:7, topic:325150"]
Makes sense -- and, they would have used the canonical form (first person singular present).

[/quote]

I never considered that they didn't use the text word form in their dictionary. Should have had enough common sense to figure that out (not necessarily from a single usage word, but from words used many times).

Hmm. Are you talking the difference between the canonical forms and each form as found in the text itself? (That is, for example, the difference between "I have" and "they had"?)

Or, perhaps, are you talking about the effects of the diacritics?

I don't know. For certain I don't know what the diacritical marks with Greek letters mean.

But just as an example, if I translated ἀνέζησεν letter for letter, I would get "anezhsen" -- whereas you have "anezēsen".
Right away I know my transliteration is not good because there's no good way to pronounce "zhs" in English -- and that's the whole point of transliterating the Greek into English!


#9

Ahh… gotcha! Take a look at this web page; it has the alphabet and also a description of the diacritics.

One of the most important you’ll want to keep your eye on is the mark for breathing. If it looks like a backwards comma over a vowel, then it’s a ‘rough breathing’ mark, which causes you to pronounce an ‘h’ sound before the vowel.

But just as an example, if I translated ἀνέζησεν letter for letter, I would get “anezhsen” – whereas you have “anezēsen”.

Right – that’s because, although a capital iota looks like ‘H’, it’s not the same as latin letter ‘h’. Instead, it’s the vowel sound in the word ‘prey’. The ‘ē’ transliteration points out that it’s not a short e (like the vowel sound in the word ‘let’), which is how epsilon sounds, but rather, it’s an iota.


#10

[quote="Gorgias, post:9, topic:325150"]
Ahh... gotcha! Take a look at this web page; it has the alphabet and also a description of the diacritics.

.

[/quote]

Thanks Gorgias.

Just read this article. Think I'll try to steer clear of transliterating unless it's really necessary.
omniglot.com/language/articles/greektransliteration.htm


#11

[quote="Nita, post:10, topic:325150"]
Thanks Gorgias.

Just read this article. Think I'll try to steer clear of transliterating unless it's really necessary.

[/quote]

;)

Well, keep in mind that the author is talking about the difficulties of transliterating a living language -- in other words, when pronunciations change and transliterations don't keep up, it can get pretty dicey! Also, when people who speak a non-inflected language (like English) run into an inflected language -- especially one that uses a different character set -- there's bound to be confusion when reading street signs!

But, luckily for us, there's not quite the same breadth of problem with Koine Greek -- there's no one who speaks it as a living language, so there's no possibility that it'll be pronounced any differently by anyone! And, as long as you keep in mind that the language is inflected -- that words take on suffixes that change the grammatical usage of the word, for example -- then you'll do fine! Keep on using transliteration while you become more familiar with the Greek alphabet!


#12

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