Revealing info to a boss about another co-worker

Hi!

I have a question about the objective morality about a certain action… suppose a co-worker decides not to show up for work for example and my boss asks me whether or not this person has shown up for work… to reveal to my boss that he hasn`t been showing up for work while it is true would it be a sin of detraction?

Thanks,
Zac

You can’t lie. If you know they haven’t shown up you need to tell the truth.

(a) It’s true. (b) Your boss has a legitimate need to know this information.
= not the sin of detraction.

Why not just state that you have not seen him/her today without adding the fact that the person has done this before. Why add fuel to the fire?

If it were just some random fellow employee asking, I’d agree. But this is the boss, who has a legitimate reason to ask, and to get an accurate answer.

Because that would imply he IS there, you just have not seen him, and that would be a lie if you know for a fact he is not present.

Offhand, it seems you should tell the boss. I also think it would not be a sin of detraction.
Several things could weigh against this. Your boss may tell the person late to you that you informed on him. Or he could learn another way. Then very well he could become your enemy and you would have trouble working with him from then on–or he could even try to get you in trouble with the boss. If such a possible result seems possible, it might seem better to give a noncommittal answer.
There is also something that strikes me as being undesirable about informing against a colleague. Something similar could happen if a parent insisted his children informed on each other. This could do damage to family life–or the operations against your place of work, to your own detriment.
However, I understand why some would think it necessary to tell your boss about the infraction of your fellow worked. But I don’t think you should do it without taking account of the possible consequences.

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