Revolution and civil war


#1

For those of you who like history…

Most revolutions are usually followed by civil wars. One notable exception is the American revolution.
Can you name other exceptions?


#2

One could argue that the French Revolution did not have a “civil war.” Although it did have uprisings in the Vendee. But that was pretty isolated.


#3

Cheap movie but a great soundtrack!

God Bless Napoleon :fr:


#4

I want to say the Dutch are an exemption.


#5

Sorry I’m not familiar with the history. Can you elaborate? Thanks.


#6

Actually, when you think about it, Napoleon wanted to force destiny. He wanted to be the Emperor that United Europe.

Unfortunately, you can’t fight the future. The Return of the French King is imminent.


#7

One could make a case that the American Revolution was a civil war.


#8

The Chinese will invade California :cn:

I wonder how that will go :thinking:


#9

Hmmmm. I always took it that Civil War is when one group is trying to overthrow the government. Under that idea, neither the American Revolution nor the American “Civil War” were civil wars. I prefer the term “War of Norther Aggression.”


#10

I’m very vague on it myself. I remember it from Larry Gonnick’s Cartoon History of the Modern World Part I (might be Part II, and despite the name, it’s an actual history book).


#11

They hide behind freeing slaves, but did they? :thinking: It was the WMD’s of the 1860’s.


#12

It would have been, had the crown won . . . which, I suppose, determines which of the two it is in most cases . . .

And for fans of obscure US history, there was another US civil war. An itty bitty one.

California and Nevada had a brief shooting war in a border dispute. Two efferent borders north of tahoe were promulgated (on along the mountain range, and the other due north). Each state sent a judge into the disputed territory, who in turn appointed marshals, who briefly spent their time shooting at one another . . . Congress quickly set the line.

hawk


#13

You forgot the Toledo War between Michigan and Ohio over the city of Toledo, which was a major port at the time. Only one man was slightly wounded, a mule was injured, and lots of drunken militia fired shots in the air and were frostbitten.
Ohio ended with Toledo and Michigan received the Upper Peninsula.


#14

Which civil war are you referring to?

I guess when I said revolutions are followed by civil war I meant sort of the “immediate” aftermath and the civil war can kind of be attributed to the revolution. I’m thinking of say china (sun overthrowing Qing and then disintegrating into warlords) or Egypt with the Arab spring or the Russian revolution.
I guess the reason is that previous unrecognised differences among the revolutionaries come to the surface. So I guess I’m not talking about years later after a revolution when some OTHER issue comes up and a civil war happens.

So the American revolution aftermath was certainly at risk of a civil war but it didn’t eventuate. I’m thinking of the various mutinies and protests straight after the revolution. Eg Pennsylvania mutiny? I’m not actually good at this history.


#15

Believe it or not, Ohio is considered the Sparta of the US :us:


#16

The one I described where Nevada and California shot at one another.

hawk


#17

Yes, it was the ‘Americans’ and new ‘settlers’ against The British and the Tories basically over territories and taxes. Darn those ol’ land grabbers and all the King’s tax collectors anyway. And even worse… some wise guys dumped all the Tea into the Sea fully aware that I’m not a coffee drinker 'cause there wasn’t coffee available at the time.


#18

I hear there’s an underground movement afoot to bring back the old CAF format. Join the Revolution!


#19

Where do I sign up!!!


#20


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