Rites and Sacraments


#1

Hello could someone please explain. Are the rites performed over the dead by a priest considered sacrements? I am not sure thanks cate


#2

Do you mean the “last rites”?

The so-called “last rites” are given to those in danger of death, but not to the dead. One must be alive to receive the sacraments.

The last rites are the three sacraments of: Reconciliation (Confession), Eucharist, and Anointing of the Sick.


#3

Thankyou that makes it very clear.


#4

Though I believe there is a grace period of up to 3 hours after death when the Church believes the soul has still not departed the body, and anointing (which forgives all sins) can be given then.


#5

Was Extreme Unction, then called Last rites, now called Anointing of the Sick. Yes, it is a Sacrament!


#6

They need to be alive, and able to go to confession, receive communion… I believe that’s why they changed the name from last rites, Cause people would call them when the person was dieing, at the last second & the Priest might not make it on time. They want you to call when you hit the hospital, don’t wait till death is imminent!


#7

What is "alive"?


#8

According to my Moral Theology Handbook, the “apparently dead” may be anointed. St. Thomas Aquinas defines death as the moment the soul leaves the body. Since we don’t know the exact moment such takes place, those who appear dead may be anointed. That being said, once rigor mortis sets in, the person is considered dead.


#9

Extreme Unction, also called Anointing, is only one of three sacraments that together form what is known as the “Last Rites”. If the person is unconscious, they cannot receive Confession or Communion but may be Anointed unless the priest is certain they are dead.


#10

Which is after 3 hours depending on conditions.


#11

Rites over someone who is dead would have to be the Funeral Rite.


#12

[quote="triumphguy, post:4, topic:305450"]
Though I believe there is a grace period of up to 3 hours after death when the Church believes the soul has still not departed the body, and anointing (which forgives all sins) can be given then.

[/quote]

Can you tell me what Church document states that (and no, trying to interpret Aquinas does not count)?
I do not believe the Church teaches the 3 hour period.
The Church does not know and does not even try to speculate when the soul leaves the body.


#13

I think an important thing this thread makes is not to wait until a person is dead to have a priest do the anointing of the sick. It is not a “last minute” thing. If a person is actively dying or in great danger of death, call a priest. Don’t wait. In this way the person might be awake and aware of the sacrament he or she is receiving and be able to possibly go to confession and receive viaticum. There is a rite in the Funeral Rites for a blessing over someone who has just died. I guess the ideal would be to have the person anointed at a time before death (and it could be a few hours or a week or more before), then have a priest called to bless the body after passing if he can’t get there just before death.


#14

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